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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 28, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - With his fiery forehands, flying blond ponytail and baggy white outfits, Australia's Lleyton Hewitt headed to Wimbledon with the goods to be a champ and a star. He routed Pete Sampras in a grass-court tuneup and was the bookmakers' second choice to take Wimbledon. But yesterday, Hewitt, the No. 7 seed, ran straight into an unassuming, underrated American named Jan-Michael Gambill and was beaten, 6-3, 6-2, 7-5, one of the big shocks of Wimbledon's opening round. "I just had one of those days," Hewitt said.
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SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2002
COLLEGE PARK - All-American linebacker E.J. Henderson announced his intention to stay at Maryland yesterday afternoon, ending nearly two months of speculation regarding his early entry into the NFL draft. "I am not ready to give up playing college ball or living the college life," said Henderson, considered by some to be the top linebacker in April's draft. "I enjoy being around teammates and look forward to returning for my senior year and the possibility that our team can build on what we accomplished this past year."
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 5, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Back in the late 1980s, there was nothing wrong with American men's tennis that couldn't be solved by the arrival of Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi and Jim Courier. Now, the search is on for a new star to lead a new generation. And it could lead to Jan-Michael Gambill. Today, Gambill is due to meet Sampras in a Wimbledon's men's quarterfinal crammed with fascinating and unexpected matchups. Unseeded and unassuming, Gambill has played scintillating grass-court tennis, using the sport's biggest event to score a career breakthrough.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - Andy Roddick twirled his racket in the air, disgusted with himself. He had had it easy in the first three games against Paradorn Srichaphan, the No. 1 player from Thailand. But now, almost suddenly, Srichaphan had found a way to break him in back-to-back service games and would force a tiebreak, before Roddick, the 18-year-old who's been crowned as the future of American tennis, righted himself and won going away, 7-6 (7-2), 6-3. "I think he just gave away almost too much at the beginning and I took some things for granted," said Roddick, the No. 9 seed.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2000
When the gates open for the U.S. Open next week, the usual suspects will be front and center - No. 1 seed Andre Agassi, 13-time Grand Slam winner Pete Sampras, 1999 Open finalist Todd Martin and Michael Chang, who continues to look for another Grand Slam victory to go with his 1989 French Open title. But also in the wings will be the young American men who are lining up to replace them. The best of the young and, as yet, unappreciated, is Jan-Michael Gambill, 23. Four players 23 or younger are seeded in the Open - No. 2 Gustavo Kuerten, No. 6 Marat Safin, No. 9 Lleyton Hewitt and No. 12 Juan Carlos Ferrero - none of them Americans.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 22, 2000
SANTANDER, Spain - There was no positive spin to put on the day, only the monotonous reality of the penetrating topspin strokes that ground the United States' Davis Cup chances to near miracle odds, if not red clay dust. John McEnroe could not help Todd Martin or Jan-Michael Gambill yesterday, and it is quite possible that Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi would not have saved McEnroe from the bad luck of the semifinal draw. Playing in Spain, on clay, in the heat of summer, was never going to be a day at the beach, even if the beach was only a long forehand away.
NEWS
January 13, 1991
THREE GOOD REASONS TO VOTE NO TO WARFrom: Jean S. EwingDarlingtonTo our senators and representatives:No war. Please vote no towar.1. We cannot win.2. We cannot afford it in money or in human life.3. Environmentally, war would be a disaster to the entire planet.So, I ask you to vote no to war.CAFETERIA'S FOOD IS POPULAR WITH STUDENTSFrom: Carl D. RobertsPrincipal, EdgewoodHigh SchoolI take exception to Angela Gambill's Jan. 6 article, "Cafeteria mystery meat gives way to modern fare."I thought the article presented a very negative view of the quality of the food and how that food is received by our students in the Harford County school system.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2002
COLLEGE PARK - All-American linebacker E.J. Henderson announced his intention to stay at Maryland yesterday afternoon, ending nearly two months of speculation regarding his early entry into the NFL draft. "I am not ready to give up playing college ball or living the college life," said Henderson, considered by some to be the top linebacker in April's draft. "I enjoy being around teammates and look forward to returning for my senior year and the possibility that our team can build on what we accomplished this past year."
FEATURES
By Mike Lacy and Mike Lacy,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 19, 1994
If the sash weren't on, the scene would be typical: a teen-ager sitting with mom and dad in a room waiting to sign papers for a car. But then, Shauna Gambill, the new Miss Teen USA, sounds like a pretty typical teen-ager.On Tuesday, Miss Gambill was crowned Miss Teen USA 1994 at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum in Biloxi, Miss. The pageant was carried live on CBS."The phone rang all night long," she says. "I got only a couple hours' sleep. That's OK. I'll just sleep on the plane."Tired or not, the reign must start.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 1, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Andre Agassi was rushing. He was playing like a man with his mind a mile away. He was being distracted by pigeons, cell phones and Todd Martin. Hope fading, forehands flailing, serves sailing long, Agassi was on the verge of being pushed right out of Wimbledon. "It's hard not to feel like you're really against the wall," Agassi said. `Then, at that point you're just thinking, `Just make the guy earn it.' " In the end, it was Agassi who earned it, saving two match points, retrieving two service breaks, rallying from 2-5 down in the final set and breaking Martin's heart en route to a ferocious 6-4, 2-6, 7-6 (3)
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 26, 2001
WIMBLEDON, England -- Andy Roddick acts like most any other 18-year-old American kid on a European adventure. He wears baggy shorts down to there, tugs a grungy-looking baseball cap backward and uncorks a shout that can cut through a noisy night. But Roddick possesses one other thing that not many other American kids will ever have -- a tennis serve that shoots above 130 mph and sends fans scrambling for cover. Yesterday, Roddick used his frenetic energy and booming serve to introduce himself to Wimbledon with a 6-4, 6-4, 7-6 (7-0)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2000
When the gates open for the U.S. Open next week, the usual suspects will be front and center - No. 1 seed Andre Agassi, 13-time Grand Slam winner Pete Sampras, 1999 Open finalist Todd Martin and Michael Chang, who continues to look for another Grand Slam victory to go with his 1989 French Open title. But also in the wings will be the young American men who are lining up to replace them. The best of the young and, as yet, unappreciated, is Jan-Michael Gambill, 23. Four players 23 or younger are seeded in the Open - No. 2 Gustavo Kuerten, No. 6 Marat Safin, No. 9 Lleyton Hewitt and No. 12 Juan Carlos Ferrero - none of them Americans.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 22, 2000
SANTANDER, Spain - There was no positive spin to put on the day, only the monotonous reality of the penetrating topspin strokes that ground the United States' Davis Cup chances to near miracle odds, if not red clay dust. John McEnroe could not help Todd Martin or Jan-Michael Gambill yesterday, and it is quite possible that Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi would not have saved McEnroe from the bad luck of the semifinal draw. Playing in Spain, on clay, in the heat of summer, was never going to be a day at the beach, even if the beach was only a long forehand away.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 5, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Back in the late 1980s, there was nothing wrong with American men's tennis that couldn't be solved by the arrival of Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi and Jim Courier. Now, the search is on for a new star to lead a new generation. And it could lead to Jan-Michael Gambill. Today, Gambill is due to meet Sampras in a Wimbledon's men's quarterfinal crammed with fascinating and unexpected matchups. Unseeded and unassuming, Gambill has played scintillating grass-court tennis, using the sport's biggest event to score a career breakthrough.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 1, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - Andre Agassi was rushing. He was playing like a man with his mind a mile away. He was being distracted by pigeons, cell phones and Todd Martin. Hope fading, forehands flailing, serves sailing long, Agassi was on the verge of being pushed right out of Wimbledon. "It's hard not to feel like you're really against the wall," Agassi said. `Then, at that point you're just thinking, `Just make the guy earn it.' " In the end, it was Agassi who earned it, saving two match points, retrieving two service breaks, rallying from 2-5 down in the final set and breaking Martin's heart en route to a ferocious 6-4, 2-6, 7-6 (3)
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 28, 2000
WIMBLEDON, England - With his fiery forehands, flying blond ponytail and baggy white outfits, Australia's Lleyton Hewitt headed to Wimbledon with the goods to be a champ and a star. He routed Pete Sampras in a grass-court tuneup and was the bookmakers' second choice to take Wimbledon. But yesterday, Hewitt, the No. 7 seed, ran straight into an unassuming, underrated American named Jan-Michael Gambill and was beaten, 6-3, 6-2, 7-5, one of the big shocks of Wimbledon's opening round. "I just had one of those days," Hewitt said.
NEWS
October 13, 1991
From: Vi BallengeeGlen BurnieAfter hearing about the "Maryland You Are Beautiful" letters in The Anne Arundel County Sun praising Angela Gambill for the feature article she had written on Jan Emmons ("Thanks for story," Anne ArundelCounty Sun, Oct. 6), I feel that I should tell your readers that Angela Gambill is also one of "Maryland You Are Beautiful" persons, as are other of your employees whose names I do not know.After reading the article about the Cook family (the family who had been living in a tent and finally rented an apartment with sparse furnishings)
NEWS
August 12, 1992
No more New AgeFrom: Julie JabaayPasadenaAll right, I have had enough of writer Angela Gambill's New Age garbage, the latest involving the article, "Therapist employs musical notes as special tools" [July 24, Anne Arundel County Sun].Guided imagery and music are forms of Eastern mysticism. Their purpose is to facilitate the participant in escaping reality, not dealing with it.Ms. Sonnen stated, "it reflects parts of us; it helps us discover our great inner potential."This is humanism: glorifying man/self.
FEATURES
By Mike Lacy and Mike Lacy,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 19, 1994
If the sash weren't on, the scene would be typical: a teen-ager sitting with mom and dad in a room waiting to sign papers for a car. But then, Shauna Gambill, the new Miss Teen USA, sounds like a pretty typical teen-ager.On Tuesday, Miss Gambill was crowned Miss Teen USA 1994 at the Mississippi Coast Coliseum in Biloxi, Miss. The pageant was carried live on CBS."The phone rang all night long," she says. "I got only a couple hours' sleep. That's OK. I'll just sleep on the plane."Tired or not, the reign must start.
NEWS
August 12, 1992
No more New AgeFrom: Julie JabaayPasadenaAll right, I have had enough of writer Angela Gambill's New Age garbage, the latest involving the article, "Therapist employs musical notes as special tools" [July 24, Anne Arundel County Sun].Guided imagery and music are forms of Eastern mysticism. Their purpose is to facilitate the participant in escaping reality, not dealing with it.Ms. Sonnen stated, "it reflects parts of us; it helps us discover our great inner potential."This is humanism: glorifying man/self.
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