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NEWS
May 31, 2009
The Miss Gambia USA Pageant will be held June 13 at 113 St. Mary's Place beginning at 8 p.m. Parts of the funds raised will be used to help the poor and uneducated children in Gambia. Go to missgambiausapageant.com. Savage library fun A "Picture Book Parade!" for ages 2-5 with an adult will be offered at 10 a.m. Thursdays. "Pajama Time," in which children are invited to come in pajamas and bring teddy bears and blankets, will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays. The branch is at 9525 Durness Lane in Laurel.
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NEWS
May 31, 2009
The Miss Gambia USA Pageant will be held June 13 at 113 St. Mary's Place beginning at 8 p.m. Parts of the funds raised will be used to help the poor and uneducated children in Gambia. Go to missgambiausapageant.com. Savage library fun A "Picture Book Parade!" for ages 2-5 with an adult will be offered at 10 a.m. Thursdays. "Pajama Time," in which children are invited to come in pajamas and bring teddy bears and blankets, will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesdays. The branch is at 9525 Durness Lane in Laurel.
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FEATURES
By Susan LaRocco and Susan LaRocco,Contributing Writer | August 2, 1992
When the tidal current began to run upriver, we raised our anchor from the muddy bottom of the River Gambia and began a voyage back in time to a world we had never experienced.We had arrived in Gambia, a country smaller than Connecticut, on the hump of West Africa, after almost two years of continuous travel on our 42-foot sailboat, Cygnus. It had weathered North Atlantic storms, carried us up the Seine to Paris, anchored off the little Irish fishing village, where my husband, Ed Quigley, was raised, and survived a knockdown near Lisbon.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
A new vaccine could save hundreds of thousands of children each year from dying of pneumonia and related ailments, according to scientists reporting today in a leading medical journal. The vaccine, tested by an international team of researchers in the West African nation of Gambia, was found to reduce overall childhood mortality by 16 percent. It had spinoff benefits as well. "This vaccine not only prevents disease in kids who were vaccinated, it also interrupts transmission, so their parents and grandparents and anyone else they come in contact with are at reduced risk of getting it," said Orin Levine of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who took part in the study.
NEWS
December 26, 2002
Sanusi Cole, who owned a Baltimore cosmetics store and moved to the United States from Gambia to give his family a better life, died Dec. 10 of complications from heart surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 38. Mr. Cole, a father of four, was awaiting a heart transplant when he died. He and his wife, Bassin, moved to New York from Gambia in 1986 in the hope of securing better jobs and better health care for Mr. Cole's heart condition. Once in the United States, he helped several family members in Gambia move here, including his brother Momodou Cole, a student at Franklin University in Columbus, Ohio.
NEWS
By James Clyburn, Earl Hilliard and Bennie Thompson | May 26, 2000
DURING a recent congressional recess, six congressional delegations went on fact-finding missions to Africa. The number of delegations visiting the continent was no coincidence. Nor was it inconsequential when the United States used its chairmanship of the U.N. Security Council to make January "Africa Month" for the council. President Clinton's recently announced trip to Nigeria in June, the second to Africa in his administration, is a welcome bid to efforts aimed at putting the map of Africa onto the U.S. policy agenda.
NEWS
March 4, 1993
Writing contest asks comparisons with GambiaCatholic Relief Services, the international relief agency based in Baltimore, is inviting high school students throughout Maryland to enter a writing contest with a March 31 deadline. Entrants must submit essays of no more than 2,000 words comparing their home communities to Gambia, the West African nation smaller than Connecticut.The contest winner and his or her sponsoring teacher will be sent on a 10-day trip to Gambia in June."Our goal is to encourage young people to think in global terms about the challenges confronting the developing world as well as the United States," said Joseph Bock, Catholic Relief Services director of development education.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
Phebe Jacobsen happened to be on duty the spring morning 32 years ago when Alex Haley walked into the Maryland Hall of Records in Annapolis, lugging suitcases stuffed with yellowed photographs and documents.Haley, whom the state archivist didn't know at the time, sat down, opened the suitcases and, in his deep, resonant voice, began telling the epic tale of his long search for his roots.His enslaved ancestor had been the son of important people, he said, kidnapped by slave traders in Gambia and shipped to Annapolis City Dock in 1767.
NEWS
By Kenneth Y. Best | January 25, 2004
WHEREVER I WENT during my eight days in Monrovia when Liberia's transitional government was being installed, I was besieged by people -- newspaper vendors, politicians and business people -- demanding to know not if but when I would return to resume publication of the newspaper, The Daily Observer. That experience in October presented me with a real and serious challenge: to ensure the newspaper is on the market again soon after nearly 15 years of dormancy. The Daily Observer survived five closures, several staff imprisonments and two arson attacks.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | May 4, 1993
When the Loyola High School senior went to the podium, he thanked all the usual people -- his parents, his Jesuit teachers, the archbishop, the Catholic Relief Services workers who were giving him a free trip to the West African nation of Gambia for winning their essay contest.He had one more person to cite, a 9-year-old boy named Jason who lives in the southwestern Virginia town of Dante, population 900."The Jesuits taught me I should try to be 'a man for others,' " said Michael J. Watts, 17, accepting his first-prize certificate from Archbishop William H. Keeler and Gambian Embassy representative Aminatta Dibba.
NEWS
By Kenneth Y. Best | January 25, 2004
WHEREVER I WENT during my eight days in Monrovia when Liberia's transitional government was being installed, I was besieged by people -- newspaper vendors, politicians and business people -- demanding to know not if but when I would return to resume publication of the newspaper, The Daily Observer. That experience in October presented me with a real and serious challenge: to ensure the newspaper is on the market again soon after nearly 15 years of dormancy. The Daily Observer survived five closures, several staff imprisonments and two arson attacks.
NEWS
December 26, 2002
Sanusi Cole, who owned a Baltimore cosmetics store and moved to the United States from Gambia to give his family a better life, died Dec. 10 of complications from heart surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 38. Mr. Cole, a father of four, was awaiting a heart transplant when he died. He and his wife, Bassin, moved to New York from Gambia in 1986 in the hope of securing better jobs and better health care for Mr. Cole's heart condition. Once in the United States, he helped several family members in Gambia move here, including his brother Momodou Cole, a student at Franklin University in Columbus, Ohio.
NEWS
By James Clyburn, Earl Hilliard and Bennie Thompson | May 26, 2000
DURING a recent congressional recess, six congressional delegations went on fact-finding missions to Africa. The number of delegations visiting the continent was no coincidence. Nor was it inconsequential when the United States used its chairmanship of the U.N. Security Council to make January "Africa Month" for the council. President Clinton's recently announced trip to Nigeria in June, the second to Africa in his administration, is a welcome bid to efforts aimed at putting the map of Africa onto the U.S. policy agenda.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
Phebe Jacobsen happened to be on duty the spring morning 32 years ago when Alex Haley walked into the Maryland Hall of Records in Annapolis, lugging suitcases stuffed with yellowed photographs and documents.Haley, whom the state archivist didn't know at the time, sat down, opened the suitcases and, in his deep, resonant voice, began telling the epic tale of his long search for his roots.His enslaved ancestor had been the son of important people, he said, kidnapped by slave traders in Gambia and shipped to Annapolis City Dock in 1767.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Staff Writer | May 4, 1993
When the Loyola High School senior went to the podium, he thanked all the usual people -- his parents, his Jesuit teachers, the archbishop, the Catholic Relief Services workers who were giving him a free trip to the West African nation of Gambia for winning their essay contest.He had one more person to cite, a 9-year-old boy named Jason who lives in the southwestern Virginia town of Dante, population 900."The Jesuits taught me I should try to be 'a man for others,' " said Michael J. Watts, 17, accepting his first-prize certificate from Archbishop William H. Keeler and Gambian Embassy representative Aminatta Dibba.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 5, 1993
Boston. -- These are times when Americans have to slip a new set of lenses into an old pair of frames.The political prescription that we wore for so long produced a kind of Cold War myopia. For almost 50 years, we pictured the world in terms of East and West, the Soviet Union and America. It was virtually all we could see.Now we are looking out again. The people and the problems that were once just outside our peripheral vision have come into clear view.Indeed Monday, International Women's Day, will mark a ''see-change'' in our understanding of the harsh realities of women's lives.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 5, 1993
Boston. -- These are times when Americans have to slip a new set of lenses into an old pair of frames.The political prescription that we wore for so long produced a kind of Cold War myopia. For almost 50 years, we pictured the world in terms of East and West, the Soviet Union and America. It was virtually all we could see.Now we are looking out again. The people and the problems that were once just outside our peripheral vision have come into clear view.Indeed Monday, International Women's Day, will mark a ''see-change'' in our understanding of the harsh realities of women's lives.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2005
A new vaccine could save hundreds of thousands of children each year from dying of pneumonia and related ailments, according to scientists reporting today in a leading medical journal. The vaccine, tested by an international team of researchers in the West African nation of Gambia, was found to reduce overall childhood mortality by 16 percent. It had spinoff benefits as well. "This vaccine not only prevents disease in kids who were vaccinated, it also interrupts transmission, so their parents and grandparents and anyone else they come in contact with are at reduced risk of getting it," said Orin Levine of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who took part in the study.
NEWS
March 4, 1993
Writing contest asks comparisons with GambiaCatholic Relief Services, the international relief agency based in Baltimore, is inviting high school students throughout Maryland to enter a writing contest with a March 31 deadline. Entrants must submit essays of no more than 2,000 words comparing their home communities to Gambia, the West African nation smaller than Connecticut.The contest winner and his or her sponsoring teacher will be sent on a 10-day trip to Gambia in June."Our goal is to encourage young people to think in global terms about the challenges confronting the developing world as well as the United States," said Joseph Bock, Catholic Relief Services director of development education.
FEATURES
By Susan LaRocco and Susan LaRocco,Contributing Writer | August 2, 1992
When the tidal current began to run upriver, we raised our anchor from the muddy bottom of the River Gambia and began a voyage back in time to a world we had never experienced.We had arrived in Gambia, a country smaller than Connecticut, on the hump of West Africa, after almost two years of continuous travel on our 42-foot sailboat, Cygnus. It had weathered North Atlantic storms, carried us up the Seine to Paris, anchored off the little Irish fishing village, where my husband, Ed Quigley, was raised, and survived a knockdown near Lisbon.
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