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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 16, 1992
David Zinman has hit upon an idea that seemed last night to score a big hit in Meyerhoff Hall. With James Galway, the superstar flutist, he imported the laid-back, off-the-wall atmosphere of his Saturday morning Casual Concerts to the evening ones.This meant that Zinman used a format a little like that of the "Tonight Show" and "Late Night with David Letterman." There were a lot of jokes -- when Galway was asked whether he kept in shape, he said, "I buy a whole lot of beer and watch girls do aerobics on TV" -- and there was a lot of talking to the audience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
Guy Fieri and the "Diners, Drive-ins and Dives" crew came through the Baltimore area last November, taping segments for the popular Food Network show at the R & R Taqueria in Elkridge, the Sip & Bite in Canton and other locations. Those segments are starting to pop up. We're sorry to say that the episode featuring the Boulevard Diner in Dundalk slipped through our fingers. If it repeats, we'll let you know. But we do know that the episode featuring Galway Bay in Annapolis is scheduled for its debut on Monday, Feb. 20 at 10 p.m., and the restaurant is hosting a celebration on Monday night beginning at 8 p.m. The fun will include door prizes, a charity raffle and a special "Diners, Drive-ins and Dives"-themed menu.
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FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | July 5, 1991
JAMES GALWAY, the owner of gold-plated flutes and a 14-karat sound, has given up conducting and almost all teaching because they threaten to nibble away at his art, generally ranked at the top since he went solo in 1975."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | November 7, 2007
They labored over admissions tests, filling in those circles with the press of a No. 2 pencil, knowing the score would determine whether Harvard Law School was in the cards. And the bar exam. Hours and hours of multiple choice and essays. The legal set must like tests. No wonder nearly 100 lawyers, judges, clerks and other legal professionals gathered Monday night at Annapolis' Galway Bay restaurant for the third Anne Arundel County Bar Association pub quiz. Some of the region's most sound legal minds competed in the quirky trivia contest played like a team sport, generating impassioned discussion.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 8, 1991
How much people love the flutist James Galway can be gauged by how willing they are to get wet for him.Last night during the superstar flutist's appearance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at Merriweather Post Pavilion in the final concert of the Columbia Festival of the Arts, it rained. It one was the sort of deluge that can sometimes make one think that Maryland is the subtropics. But most of the people sitting on the lawn did not leave, preferring to get drenched in order to hear Galway play Mozart with the BSO and its music director, David Zinman.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 16, 1992
David Zinman has hit upon an idea that seemed last night to score a big hit in Meyerhoff Hall. With James Galway, the superstar flutist, he imported the laid-back, off-the-wall atmosphere of his Saturday morning Casual Concerts to the evening ones.This meant that Zinman used a format a little like that of the "Tonight Show" and "Late Night with David Letterman." There were a lot of jokes -- when Galway was asked whether he kept in shape, he said, "I buy a whole lot of beer and watch girls do aerobics on TV" -- and there was a lot of talking to the audience.
TRAVEL
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
It's your first day in Ireland. The weather is bracing, the Emerald Isle's scenery is even greener than you expected, and you've negotiated the winding drive from Shannon Airport to Galway, the 760-year-old town known as City of the Tribes. There's an edge of excitement - you've never driven on the opposite side of the road, and it's awkward shifting with your left hand - but you've found a groove, plunged safely into a dozen busy roundabouts and made it to your Tudor-style bed and breakfast safe and sound.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | November 7, 2007
They labored over admissions tests, filling in those circles with the press of a No. 2 pencil, knowing the score would determine whether Harvard Law School was in the cards. And the bar exam. Hours and hours of multiple choice and essays. The legal set must like tests. No wonder nearly 100 lawyers, judges, clerks and other legal professionals gathered Monday night at Annapolis' Galway Bay restaurant for the third Anne Arundel County Bar Association pub quiz. Some of the region's most sound legal minds competed in the quirky trivia contest played like a team sport, generating impassioned discussion.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2001
GALWAY, IRELAND - When it's not raining, visitors to this tourist mecca in western Ireland can watch the sun set on Galway Bay. They can also watch a remarkable drama play out: High school teachers strike while their students take to the streets to condemn the action. The students carry signs reading "Stupid adults plus stupid government = ignorant students" and "We want our education - now!" And you thought students wanted to be out of school. Labor in this labor-management dispute is the 17,000-member Association of Secondary Teachers, Ireland, which has been gradually escalating job actions for five months in search of higher wages and pay for extra duties.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 22, 1993
There isn't an original idea in Lowell Liebermann's Flute Concerto.This piece -- which was commissioned a few years ago by the flutist James Galway and was performed by him last night in Meyerhoff Hall with David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony -- begins as if it was Prokofiev's First Violin Concerto. That dreamy, lyrical opening is followed by a section reminiscent of Rachmaninov's "Symphonic Dances" that in turn is followed by something that sounds like the music John Williams wrote for "Star Wars," which leads into a motorythmic Shostakovich-like passage that drops the listener into another dreamy section reminiscent of Williams' film score for "E.T."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 19, 2005
LONDON - Nick Leeson, the "rogue trader" who brought down Britain's Barings PLC bank 10 years ago, has landed a new job: commercial manager of the Galway United Football Club, an Irish soccer team. As Barings' head trader in Singapore, Leeson made spiraling losses totaling $1.3 billion that pushed the 240-year-old bank into insolvency in 1995. ING Groep NV, a Dutch financial services company, eventually bought its assets for one pound ($1.90). Leeson, 38, and his wife and three children have lived in Galway for 2 1/2 years, and he will take up his new post next week, club Chairman John Fallon said in a phone interview.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2001
GALWAY, IRELAND - When it's not raining, visitors to this tourist mecca in western Ireland can watch the sun set on Galway Bay. They can also watch a remarkable drama play out: High school teachers strike while their students take to the streets to condemn the action. The students carry signs reading "Stupid adults plus stupid government = ignorant students" and "We want our education - now!" And you thought students wanted to be out of school. Labor in this labor-management dispute is the 17,000-member Association of Secondary Teachers, Ireland, which has been gradually escalating job actions for five months in search of higher wages and pay for extra duties.
TRAVEL
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
It's your first day in Ireland. The weather is bracing, the Emerald Isle's scenery is even greener than you expected, and you've negotiated the winding drive from Shannon Airport to Galway, the 760-year-old town known as City of the Tribes. There's an edge of excitement - you've never driven on the opposite side of the road, and it's awkward shifting with your left hand - but you've found a groove, plunged safely into a dozen busy roundabouts and made it to your Tudor-style bed and breakfast safe and sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 22, 1993
There isn't an original idea in Lowell Liebermann's Flute Concerto.This piece -- which was commissioned a few years ago by the flutist James Galway and was performed by him last night in Meyerhoff Hall with David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony -- begins as if it was Prokofiev's First Violin Concerto. That dreamy, lyrical opening is followed by a section reminiscent of Rachmaninov's "Symphonic Dances" that in turn is followed by something that sounds like the music John Williams wrote for "Star Wars," which leads into a motorythmic Shostakovich-like passage that drops the listener into another dreamy section reminiscent of Williams' film score for "E.T."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 16, 1992
David Zinman has hit upon an idea that seemed last night to score a big hit in Meyerhoff Hall. With James Galway, the superstar flutist, he imported the laid-back, off-the-wall atmosphere of his Saturday morning Casual Concerts to the evening ones.This meant that Zinman used a format a little like that of the "Tonight Show" and "Late Night with David Letterman." There were a lot of jokes -- when Galway was asked whether he kept in shape, he said, "I buy a whole lot of beer and watch girls do aerobics on TV" -- and there was a lot of talking to the audience.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 16, 1992
David Zinman has hit upon an idea that seemed last night to score a big hit in Meyerhoff Hall. With James Galway, the superstar flutist, he imported the laid-back, off-the-wall atmosphere of his Saturday morning Casual Concerts to the evening ones.This meant that Zinman used a format a little like that of the "Tonight Show" and "Late Night with David Letterman." There were a lot of jokes -- when Galway was asked whether he kept in shape, he said, "I buy a whole lot of beer and watch girls do aerobics on TV" -- and there was a lot of talking to the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
Guy Fieri and the "Diners, Drive-ins and Dives" crew came through the Baltimore area last November, taping segments for the popular Food Network show at the R & R Taqueria in Elkridge, the Sip & Bite in Canton and other locations. Those segments are starting to pop up. We're sorry to say that the episode featuring the Boulevard Diner in Dundalk slipped through our fingers. If it repeats, we'll let you know. But we do know that the episode featuring Galway Bay in Annapolis is scheduled for its debut on Monday, Feb. 20 at 10 p.m., and the restaurant is hosting a celebration on Monday night beginning at 8 p.m. The fun will include door prizes, a charity raffle and a special "Diners, Drive-ins and Dives"-themed menu.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 19, 2005
LONDON - Nick Leeson, the "rogue trader" who brought down Britain's Barings PLC bank 10 years ago, has landed a new job: commercial manager of the Galway United Football Club, an Irish soccer team. As Barings' head trader in Singapore, Leeson made spiraling losses totaling $1.3 billion that pushed the 240-year-old bank into insolvency in 1995. ING Groep NV, a Dutch financial services company, eventually bought its assets for one pound ($1.90). Leeson, 38, and his wife and three children have lived in Galway for 2 1/2 years, and he will take up his new post next week, club Chairman John Fallon said in a phone interview.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 8, 1991
How much people love the flutist James Galway can be gauged by how willing they are to get wet for him.Last night during the superstar flutist's appearance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at Merriweather Post Pavilion in the final concert of the Columbia Festival of the Arts, it rained. It one was the sort of deluge that can sometimes make one think that Maryland is the subtropics. But most of the people sitting on the lawn did not leave, preferring to get drenched in order to hear Galway play Mozart with the BSO and its music director, David Zinman.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | July 5, 1991
JAMES GALWAY, the owner of gold-plated flutes and a 14-karat sound, has given up conducting and almost all teaching because they threaten to nibble away at his art, generally ranked at the top since he went solo in 1975."
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