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By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 8, 1993
Galveston, Texas--All of a sudden, things are perking up in this historic Gulf Coast city.A tropical rain-forest exhibit encased in a glass pyramid 10 stories tall has just opened. A new tourist attraction, hotel and restaurant have been built on the waterfront.And just a 35-minute drive away, NASA's new $70 million attraction, Space Center Houston, is packing 'em in.All of which is good news for this historic port city, whose fortunes have ebbed and flowed more than once.Once the biggest and richest city in Texas, Galveston today pins its fortunes on tourism.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
At a summertime party, my dinner companion turned out to be none other than the incomparable Barbara Sealy Mallory Hathaway, one of my favorite people, whom everyone calls "Bunny. " At some point in the evening, table talk turned to shipwrecks (she's from an old New England shipping family) and other disasters, both manmade and natural. Bunny, who lives in Owings Mills, had recently been going though some old family files and mentioned that she had letters written by relatives who had survived the great hurricane that swept into Galveston, Texas, on Sept.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 13, 2008
GALVESTON, Texas - Punishing winds and waves from Hurricane Ike smashed into this low-lying barrier island yesterday, flooding roads and providing a preview of what authorities predicted would be catastrophic damage to Galveston - and possibly Houston and other inland areas. The storm, as big as Texas and packing winds of at least 110 mph, was expected to slam into the coast somewhere near Galveston just after midnight. Forecasters predicted that the storm's "dirty side," with the heaviest storm surge and highest winds, would batter Houston, the nation's fourth-largest city.
NEWS
By Erika Slife and Howard Witt and Erika Slife and Howard Witt,Chicago Tribune | September 15, 2008
HOUSTON - The nation's fourth-largest city lay paralyzed, sweltering and almost completely blacked-out yesterday as frustrated residents waited in vain for promised federal disaster aid to be distributed more than 36 hours after Hurricane Ike tore through the region. Worried authorities extended a dusk-to-dawn curfew to prevent looting across the eerily darkened city. Meanwhile, rescue teams fanned out through flooded neighborhoods of Galveston Island, the hard-hit coastal community south of Houston where Ike made landfall, pulling nearly 2,000 victims to safety.
NEWS
April 20, 2006
On April 16, 2006 J. PALMER, Beloved husband of Mary Kuriga Saunders (Nee Womeldorph) and the late Margaret Seibert Saunders. Devoted father of Margaret Saunders, Adam and the late George Palmer Saunders, II. Loving grandfather of Stephens Palmer Adam, Jack Stewart Adam and Susan Elizabeth Saunders, M.D. Step-father of Michael Kuriga and Douglas Kuriga. A Memorial Service will be held in Galveston, Texas on Friday, May 19th, 2006. Interment in Dayton, Ohio. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Mary and J. Palmer Saunders Professorship for Excellence in Teaching at the University of Texas Medical Branch Graduate School of Biomedical Science, 301 University Blvd.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 17, 2000
WASHINGTON - Fearful of ever-rising Social Security taxes, three Texas counties dropped out of the federal retirement program in the early 1980s, channeling their employees' payroll taxes into private investments instead. The bold 20-year experiment has yielded contradictory and somewhat surprising results: Many of the counties' 3,000 employees - especially low- to middle-income workers - will actually earn less money than if they had stuck with Social Security, according to a congressional analysis.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 2003
Robert A. Durst, the millionaire real estate heir from New York who was living like a drifter in Texas, was acquitted yesterday of charges that he murdered a 71-year-old neighbor in Galveston two years ago. Durst, 60, admitted killing Morris Black in September 2001, butchering him, putting his body parts in garbage bags and dumping them into Galveston Bay. But he steadfastly maintained that the death was the result of a struggle and not murder. When the state jury in Galveston returned the not-guilty verdict in a courtroom scene televised nationwide, Durst looked stunned, his mouth agape, and then he looked upward as if in relief.
NEWS
October 6, 2005
William Frederick Schmid, a retired Bethlehem Steel engineer, was fatally injured Saturday in an automobile accident near Salisbury on the Eastern Shore. The former resident of Lauraville was 80. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, he was a 1943 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Forces as a bombardier. Shot down on a flight over Germany on Dec. 23, 1944, he parachuted from his plane and spent about four months as a prisoner of war. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering at the Johns Hopkins University and was a Bethlehem Steel engineer before retiring in 1988.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
At a summertime party, my dinner companion turned out to be none other than the incomparable Barbara Sealy Mallory Hathaway, one of my favorite people, whom everyone calls "Bunny. " At some point in the evening, table talk turned to shipwrecks (she's from an old New England shipping family) and other disasters, both manmade and natural. Bunny, who lives in Owings Mills, had recently been going though some old family files and mentioned that she had letters written by relatives who had survived the great hurricane that swept into Galveston, Texas, on Sept.
TRAVEL
By Toni Salama and Toni Salama,Chicago Tribune | September 30, 2007
GALVESTON, TEXAS / / She was only a child at the time, but Bettie Brown's recollection of the hurricane of 1900 is still retold in vivid detail. She was standing on the staircase of her parents' Italianate mansion when the waters swept through the first floor, rising and bringing horrible things with it. Some reports would later say that the storm surge washed clear over Galveston Island. Brown's mother acted on an inspiration to leave Ashton Villa's doors and tall, graceful windows wide open to the torrent, and so the only lasting effects the delicate-looking home sustained were a basement filled with sand and a wrought-iron fence rendered forever "shorter," the bottom few feet buried by the grade change.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 13, 2008
GALVESTON, Texas - Punishing winds and waves from Hurricane Ike smashed into this low-lying barrier island yesterday, flooding roads and providing a preview of what authorities predicted would be catastrophic damage to Galveston - and possibly Houston and other inland areas. The storm, as big as Texas and packing winds of at least 110 mph, was expected to slam into the coast somewhere near Galveston just after midnight. Forecasters predicted that the storm's "dirty side," with the heaviest storm surge and highest winds, would batter Houston, the nation's fourth-largest city.
NEWS
By David Zucchino and P.J. Huffstutter and David Zucchino and P.J. Huffstutter,Los Angeles Times | September 12, 2008
FREEPORT, Texas - Thousands of residents of Texas' vulnerable Gulf Coast clogged highways heading inland yesterday as they heeded mandatory evacuation orders. Hurricane Ike churned through warm gulf waters and took aim at southeast Texas. Facing a hurricane that Gov. Rick Perry said could have "extraordinary impact," authorities ordered the evacuation of residents of low-lying coastal areas south and east of Houston. Chemical companies and refineries shut down their plants, bracing for high winds and damaging floods.
TRAVEL
By Toni Salama and Toni Salama,Chicago Tribune | September 30, 2007
GALVESTON, TEXAS / / She was only a child at the time, but Bettie Brown's recollection of the hurricane of 1900 is still retold in vivid detail. She was standing on the staircase of her parents' Italianate mansion when the waters swept through the first floor, rising and bringing horrible things with it. Some reports would later say that the storm surge washed clear over Galveston Island. Brown's mother acted on an inspiration to leave Ashton Villa's doors and tall, graceful windows wide open to the torrent, and so the only lasting effects the delicate-looking home sustained were a basement filled with sand and a wrought-iron fence rendered forever "shorter," the bottom few feet buried by the grade change.
NEWS
April 20, 2006
On April 16, 2006 J. PALMER, Beloved husband of Mary Kuriga Saunders (Nee Womeldorph) and the late Margaret Seibert Saunders. Devoted father of Margaret Saunders, Adam and the late George Palmer Saunders, II. Loving grandfather of Stephens Palmer Adam, Jack Stewart Adam and Susan Elizabeth Saunders, M.D. Step-father of Michael Kuriga and Douglas Kuriga. A Memorial Service will be held in Galveston, Texas on Friday, May 19th, 2006. Interment in Dayton, Ohio. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Mary and J. Palmer Saunders Professorship for Excellence in Teaching at the University of Texas Medical Branch Graduate School of Biomedical Science, 301 University Blvd.
NEWS
October 6, 2005
William Frederick Schmid, a retired Bethlehem Steel engineer, was fatally injured Saturday in an automobile accident near Salisbury on the Eastern Shore. The former resident of Lauraville was 80. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, he was a 1943 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Forces as a bombardier. Shot down on a flight over Germany on Dec. 23, 1944, he parachuted from his plane and spent about four months as a prisoner of war. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering at the Johns Hopkins University and was a Bethlehem Steel engineer before retiring in 1988.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 2003
Robert A. Durst, the millionaire real estate heir from New York who was living like a drifter in Texas, was acquitted yesterday of charges that he murdered a 71-year-old neighbor in Galveston two years ago. Durst, 60, admitted killing Morris Black in September 2001, butchering him, putting his body parts in garbage bags and dumping them into Galveston Bay. But he steadfastly maintained that the death was the result of a struggle and not murder. When the state jury in Galveston returned the not-guilty verdict in a courtroom scene televised nationwide, Durst looked stunned, his mouth agape, and then he looked upward as if in relief.
NEWS
By David Zucchino and P.J. Huffstutter and David Zucchino and P.J. Huffstutter,Los Angeles Times | September 12, 2008
FREEPORT, Texas - Thousands of residents of Texas' vulnerable Gulf Coast clogged highways heading inland yesterday as they heeded mandatory evacuation orders. Hurricane Ike churned through warm gulf waters and took aim at southeast Texas. Facing a hurricane that Gov. Rick Perry said could have "extraordinary impact," authorities ordered the evacuation of residents of low-lying coastal areas south and east of Houston. Chemical companies and refineries shut down their plants, bracing for high winds and damaging floods.
NEWS
By Erika Slife and Howard Witt and Erika Slife and Howard Witt,Chicago Tribune | September 15, 2008
HOUSTON - The nation's fourth-largest city lay paralyzed, sweltering and almost completely blacked-out yesterday as frustrated residents waited in vain for promised federal disaster aid to be distributed more than 36 hours after Hurricane Ike tore through the region. Worried authorities extended a dusk-to-dawn curfew to prevent looting across the eerily darkened city. Meanwhile, rescue teams fanned out through flooded neighborhoods of Galveston Island, the hard-hit coastal community south of Houston where Ike made landfall, pulling nearly 2,000 victims to safety.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 17, 2000
WASHINGTON - Fearful of ever-rising Social Security taxes, three Texas counties dropped out of the federal retirement program in the early 1980s, channeling their employees' payroll taxes into private investments instead. The bold 20-year experiment has yielded contradictory and somewhat surprising results: Many of the counties' 3,000 employees - especially low- to middle-income workers - will actually earn less money than if they had stuck with Social Security, according to a congressional analysis.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
There's a good story being told in "The Road to Galveston," but there's an even better story struggling to get out.Loosely based on the life of screenwriter Tony Lee's grandmother, this quietly inspiring film, airing at 9 tonight on USA, marks something of a departure for the cable network, whose films are usually flimsy potboilers or unimaginative shoot-'em-ups. Its failure to be all it could is less a testimony to the film's shortcomings than its high aspirations; you'll enjoy this movie, be impressed by the fine acting and believable dialogue.
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