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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
COLLEGE PARK -- Bill Galston has enough time for Ezra these days.And he's certain he made the right decision 22 months ago when, after serving more than two years as deputy domestic policy adviser in Bill Clinton's White House, he quit to spend more time with his young son.But he hasn't put politics behind him. Just the high energy, adrenalin pumping, every-waking-minute kind of politics.Which isn't to say he's not busy in his new life.William A. Galston is a professor at the University of Maryland's School of Public Affairs.
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NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 4, 2007
After social scientist William Galston presented his report on what our twentysomething children are up to these days, he was swamped with e-mails, phone calls and dinner-party button-holing by panicked parents. "It appears we have an entire generation of parents who are asking themselves what they are supposed to be doing now," said Galston, a scholar at the Brookings Institution and himself the father of a twentysomething son. Last month, Galston described this new developmental stage between adolescence and adulthood in a presentation sponsored by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy - which has expanded its provinces to include a new decade of driftiness and uncertainty that appears to follow the teen years.
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NEWS
By Mona Charen | March 28, 1994
IT IS difficult to hear it above the din of the Clinton administration -- Whitewater, Joycelyn Elders endorsing homosexual adoption, the health-care fight -- but a truly significant sound is issuing from the liberal side of the family values debate: It is the sound of cement breaking.Thoughtful people in the Democratic Party are beginning to acknowledge that the breakdown of the family is the most serious social problem we face. The Atlantic magazine put the acknowledgment on its front cover last year in an article by Barbara Dafoe Whitehead titled "Dan Quayle Was Right."
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | October 28, 2007
A social scientist defined it. A respected journalist named it. And parents are buzzing about it. It is the "odyssey," a little understood and very disconcerting - for parents - "decade of wandering" that occurs between adolescence and adulthood. Research by William Galston, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, describes an economic and social shake-up that has jumbled - or postponed drastically - the traditional sequence we thought our children would follow into adulthood: education, maybe a little more education, a job that morphs into a career, marriage and family.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 4, 2007
After social scientist William Galston presented his report on what our twentysomething children are up to these days, he was swamped with e-mails, phone calls and dinner-party button-holing by panicked parents. "It appears we have an entire generation of parents who are asking themselves what they are supposed to be doing now," said Galston, a scholar at the Brookings Institution and himself the father of a twentysomething son. Last month, Galston described this new developmental stage between adolescence and adulthood in a presentation sponsored by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy - which has expanded its provinces to include a new decade of driftiness and uncertainty that appears to follow the teen years.
NEWS
May 2, 2006
City woman, 31, found slain in her home A 31-year-old woman was found fatally stabbed Saturday night in her home in Baltimore's Brooklyn section, city police reported yesterday as they continued their investigation. The body of Mary Galston of the 4100 block of Hyden Court, near Baybrook Park, was found lying in a room shortly before 9 p.m. when her brother arrived for a visit, said Agent Donny Moses, a police spokesman. "When he found his sister, the brother immediately dialed 911," Moses said, adding that Galston was pronounced dead at the scene by medics.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | October 28, 2007
A social scientist defined it. A respected journalist named it. And parents are buzzing about it. It is the "odyssey," a little understood and very disconcerting - for parents - "decade of wandering" that occurs between adolescence and adulthood. Research by William Galston, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, describes an economic and social shake-up that has jumbled - or postponed drastically - the traditional sequence we thought our children would follow into adulthood: education, maybe a little more education, a job that morphs into a career, marriage and family.
NEWS
By Joanne Jacobs | November 3, 1998
WIRED workers are the wave of the future, political analysts say. Political parties will learn to surf the new demographics, or go under.Wired workers solve problems as part of self-directed teams, and regularly use computers on the job. They tend to be self-reliant, mobile, affluent, pro-free market, socially tolerant and deeply concerned about educating their children and re-educating themselves.A growing classAnd they are multiplying. A 1998 survey for the Institute for the New California, a think tank, estimated that 57 percent of California workers are wired.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 18, 1994
"Just say no to sex." Sounds like a very tough idea to sell.But as President Clinton's domestic policy advisers tackle the burgeoning problem of out-of-wedlock births -- too squeamish to pull the plug on welfare and frustrated by the failure of any other notion to "move the needle" -- it is an idea they may come back to.This kind of persuasion, with slick ad campaigns and gruesome video lessons in schools, has had a measureable impact on teen smoking rates and on drug use.Why not try it with sex?
NEWS
By Robert Gee and Robert Gee,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | November 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Pointing to a decline in national civility, Sen. Sam Nunn and William J. Bennett, the former education secretary and drug czar, teamed up yesterday to launch a commission to study what they say are the social pathologies that imperil society.Nunn, a retiring Georgia Democrat, and Bennett, a leading GOP voice on moral issues, said they were alarmed by signs of a nation succumbing to drug abuse, crime, pornography and family breakups, among other problems.They said they saw no obvious remedies but thought the commission's recommendations, to be offered by the end of next year, would be crafted to encourage civic responsibility.
NEWS
May 2, 2006
City woman, 31, found slain in her home A 31-year-old woman was found fatally stabbed Saturday night in her home in Baltimore's Brooklyn section, city police reported yesterday as they continued their investigation. The body of Mary Galston of the 4100 block of Hyden Court, near Baybrook Park, was found lying in a room shortly before 9 p.m. when her brother arrived for a visit, said Agent Donny Moses, a police spokesman. "When he found his sister, the brother immediately dialed 911," Moses said, adding that Galston was pronounced dead at the scene by medics.
NEWS
By Joanne Jacobs | November 3, 1998
WIRED workers are the wave of the future, political analysts say. Political parties will learn to surf the new demographics, or go under.Wired workers solve problems as part of self-directed teams, and regularly use computers on the job. They tend to be self-reliant, mobile, affluent, pro-free market, socially tolerant and deeply concerned about educating their children and re-educating themselves.A growing classAnd they are multiplying. A 1998 survey for the Institute for the New California, a think tank, estimated that 57 percent of California workers are wired.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
COLLEGE PARK -- Bill Galston has enough time for Ezra these days.And he's certain he made the right decision 22 months ago when, after serving more than two years as deputy domestic policy adviser in Bill Clinton's White House, he quit to spend more time with his young son.But he hasn't put politics behind him. Just the high energy, adrenalin pumping, every-waking-minute kind of politics.Which isn't to say he's not busy in his new life.William A. Galston is a professor at the University of Maryland's School of Public Affairs.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 18, 1994
"Just say no to sex." Sounds like a very tough idea to sell.But as President Clinton's domestic policy advisers tackle the burgeoning problem of out-of-wedlock births -- too squeamish to pull the plug on welfare and frustrated by the failure of any other notion to "move the needle" -- it is an idea they may come back to.This kind of persuasion, with slick ad campaigns and gruesome video lessons in schools, has had a measureable impact on teen smoking rates and on drug use.Why not try it with sex?
NEWS
By Mona Charen | March 28, 1994
IT IS difficult to hear it above the din of the Clinton administration -- Whitewater, Joycelyn Elders endorsing homosexual adoption, the health-care fight -- but a truly significant sound is issuing from the liberal side of the family values debate: It is the sound of cement breaking.Thoughtful people in the Democratic Party are beginning to acknowledge that the breakdown of the family is the most serious social problem we face. The Atlantic magazine put the acknowledgment on its front cover last year in an article by Barbara Dafoe Whitehead titled "Dan Quayle Was Right."
NEWS
January 7, 1993
Galston is panelist for annual forum of Woodstock centerWilliam A. Galston, a professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, will be a panelist for the annual Woodstock Theological Center Forum at 8 p.m. Tuesday at the Bunn Intercultural Center Auditorium, Georgetown University, 37th and O streets N.W., Washington, D.C. The title of this year's free, public forum is "A New Era of Church-State Relations? John Courtney Murray, S.J., and Religious Pluralism."Other participants will be the Rev. J. Leon Hooper, S.J., senior fellow of the Woodstock center; and Michael J. Perry, a professor the Northwestern University School of Law. The moderator will be Margaret O'Brien Steinfels, editor of Commonweal magazine.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- First, there was Bill Clinton conceding last year that Dan Quayle was more right than wrong when he attacked Murphy Brown for having an out-of-wedlock child. Last week, liberal Health Secretary Donna E. Shalala said as much, chalking up another one for traditional family values.Vice President Al Gore held a conference this month on fatherhood. And this week, the White House opens its doors for a conference on building the American character.Whose values are these, anyway?Recognizing the public's concern that society's moral fiber is fraying at every seam, Democrats have seized on the issues of family, values, responsibility and character -- potent political weapons once held exclusively in conservative Republican and religious-right arsenals -- and are trying to make them their own."
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