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By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 9, 2003
SMYRNA, Del. - Shortly before 9 a.m. yesterday, a backhoe yanked a chain attached to the Delaware Correctional Center's gallows, and the ghastly relic of this state's 341-year-old history with the death penalty crashed to the ground. State officials could have quietly disassembled the rickety wooden structure - 23 steps, a trap door and a cross beam from which to hang a noose. But this device, built 17 years ago and used in the last hanging execution in the United States in 1996, carries too much symbolism to do that, they decided.
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NEWS
August 22, 2007
On August 15, 2007, DOUGLAS J. GALLOW of Dataw Island, SC. Born July 18, 1925 on Long Island, NY. He served in the 104th Timberwolf Infantry Division in the European Theater in WWII. He retired as Director of Market Research from the Noxell Corporation, Baltimore, MD. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Harriet, his daughter Ellen of Decatur, GA, son Doug, Jr., of Lebanon, OH and daughter Connie of Bel Air, MD. Doug is also survived by a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law and ten grandchildren.
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NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | July 22, 1993
BERLIN -- Dieter Paprotka, Berlin's connoisseur of capital punishment, prefers hanging."Hanging is the most interesting," Mr. Paprotka says.The electric chair, the gas chamber and lethal injection are cold and mechanical. There's a personal touch to execution by hanging, he says, a kind of rapport between the hangman and the hanged."Someone actually does the work. He actually pulls the cord. I would say there is an art in doing it the right way. So that it goes clean and quick."Mr. Paprotka is the proprietor of a private museum of capital punishment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2006
Elevator to the Gallows [Criterion] $40 After working as a cameraman and co-director for underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau, Louis Malle made his self-assured feature film directorial debut with the gripping 1957 romantic thriller Elevator to the Gallows (Criterion, $40). The French filmmaker was all of 24 when he co-wrote the screenplay and directed this tale about the illicit love affair between a married woman (Jeanne Moreau) and the handsome ex-paratrooper (Maurice Ronet) who works for her much older, wealthy husband.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2001
The impending execution of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy J. McVeigh at a maximum-security prison in Terre Haute, Ind., on May 16, has already revved up an army of enterprising ghouls. They hope to profit from the execution of America's most hated criminal by selling commemorative T-shirts and other souvenirs. As lawyers are busy filing lawsuits seeking to allow McVeigh's execution by lethal injection to be shown on the Web, reporters continue to seek access to closed-circuit broadcasts.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | September 9, 2005
JUSTICE POTTER STEWART uttered his famous statement that he wouldn't attempt to define obscenity, "But I know it when I see it," when the Supreme Court overturned the obscenity conviction of an Ohio cinema that had played Louis Malle's precocious 1958 erotic masterpiece, The Lovers. That movie comes to Washington in a fresh new print this fall when AFI Silver, the National Gallery of Art and La Maison Francaise present Risk and Reinvention: The Cinema of Louis Malle, a near-complete retrospective of the director's groundbreaking, energizing movies.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 6, 2001
MEERUT, India - Ten times, Mammu Singh has tightened the noose around a condemned man's neck, pulled the trapdoor's iron lever and watched the prisoner drop, and this is the thanks he gets. The hangman is now a prisoner of the same state that hired him to kill. Constables arrested the executioner in mid-June because he has made no payments on a $65 loan he took out from the government-owned Syndicate Bank in 1989. Singh, who thinks he is the last Indian willing and legally able to hang anyone, says he can't make good on his debt because the government has stiffed him for the past 15 months of his salary, a total of $391.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2006
Elevator to the Gallows [Criterion] $40 After working as a cameraman and co-director for underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau, Louis Malle made his self-assured feature film directorial debut with the gripping 1957 romantic thriller Elevator to the Gallows (Criterion, $40). The French filmmaker was all of 24 when he co-wrote the screenplay and directed this tale about the illicit love affair between a married woman (Jeanne Moreau) and the handsome ex-paratrooper (Maurice Ronet) who works for her much older, wealthy husband.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | January 15, 1994
TOKYO -- Hidden within the thick walls of Japanese prisons, the gallows have been swinging again, ending the longest hiatus in executions in 800 years.After more than three years without any capital punishment, seven criminals are believed to have been hanged last year. The authorities won't talk about it.Evidence comes from tiny facts laboriously collected by anti-death penalty activists, commonly referred to here as abolitionists, and from indefatigable news organizations.A limited confirmation will only emerge when the Ministry of Justice releases a dry statistical report on 1993 criminal activity in forthcoming months.
NEWS
August 22, 2007
On August 15, 2007, DOUGLAS J. GALLOW of Dataw Island, SC. Born July 18, 1925 on Long Island, NY. He served in the 104th Timberwolf Infantry Division in the European Theater in WWII. He retired as Director of Market Research from the Noxell Corporation, Baltimore, MD. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Harriet, his daughter Ellen of Decatur, GA, son Doug, Jr., of Lebanon, OH and daughter Connie of Bel Air, MD. Doug is also survived by a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law and ten grandchildren.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | September 9, 2005
JUSTICE POTTER STEWART uttered his famous statement that he wouldn't attempt to define obscenity, "But I know it when I see it," when the Supreme Court overturned the obscenity conviction of an Ohio cinema that had played Louis Malle's precocious 1958 erotic masterpiece, The Lovers. That movie comes to Washington in a fresh new print this fall when AFI Silver, the National Gallery of Art and La Maison Francaise present Risk and Reinvention: The Cinema of Louis Malle, a near-complete retrospective of the director's groundbreaking, energizing movies.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- John Brown's last shot came from the fire engine house at the foot of Shenandoah Street; his Bible and a broadsword from Bleeding Kansas are on display in a nearby museum. Nearly 145 years have passed since Brown led 21 raiders on a mission to seize 100,000 guns stored here at the federal arsenal. A militant abolitionist, Brown hoped that runaway slaves would join his "liberation army," which would take refuge in nearby mountains and fight a guerrilla war against slaveholders.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 9, 2003
SMYRNA, Del. - Shortly before 9 a.m. yesterday, a backhoe yanked a chain attached to the Delaware Correctional Center's gallows, and the ghastly relic of this state's 341-year-old history with the death penalty crashed to the ground. State officials could have quietly disassembled the rickety wooden structure - 23 steps, a trap door and a cross beam from which to hang a noose. But this device, built 17 years ago and used in the last hanging execution in the United States in 1996, carries too much symbolism to do that, they decided.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 6, 2001
MEERUT, India - Ten times, Mammu Singh has tightened the noose around a condemned man's neck, pulled the trapdoor's iron lever and watched the prisoner drop, and this is the thanks he gets. The hangman is now a prisoner of the same state that hired him to kill. Constables arrested the executioner in mid-June because he has made no payments on a $65 loan he took out from the government-owned Syndicate Bank in 1989. Singh, who thinks he is the last Indian willing and legally able to hang anyone, says he can't make good on his debt because the government has stiffed him for the past 15 months of his salary, a total of $391.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2001
The impending execution of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy J. McVeigh at a maximum-security prison in Terre Haute, Ind., on May 16, has already revved up an army of enterprising ghouls. They hope to profit from the execution of America's most hated criminal by selling commemorative T-shirts and other souvenirs. As lawyers are busy filing lawsuits seeking to allow McVeigh's execution by lethal injection to be shown on the Web, reporters continue to seek access to closed-circuit broadcasts.
NEWS
March 27, 1998
AFTER SPENDING $57 million in government funds to lure the world-renowned co-discoverer of the AIDS virus, Dr. Robert C. Gallo, to Maryland, some legislators in Annapolis want to shut off state aid and in the process send a dangerous message to the business community.A Senate committee has voted to end financial support after this year for Dr. Gallo's trend-setting Institute for Human Virology in Baltimore. It is a short-sighted move that could destroy years of effort to make Baltimore a center for biotech research.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
When convicted murderer Billy Bailey steps onto the wooden gallows built just for him outside the Delaware Correctional Center tonight after midnight, it will be a grim end to a grim story.Bailey, 49, is one of 14 inmates awaiting death on Delaware -- a surprisingly large number for a tiny state with only three counties. He will be the first person in 50 years in Delaware to die by hanging, and he may be the last. This method of execution is considered so brutal that only four states use it and all four offer lethal injection as an alternative.
NEWS
March 27, 1998
AFTER SPENDING $57 million in government funds to lure the world-renowned co-discoverer of the AIDS virus, Dr. Robert C. Gallo, to Maryland, some legislators in Annapolis want to shut off state aid and in the process send a dangerous message to the business community.A Senate committee has voted to end financial support after this year for Dr. Gallo's trend-setting Institute for Human Virology in Baltimore. It is a short-sighted move that could destroy years of effort to make Baltimore a center for biotech research.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1996
When convicted murderer Billy Bailey steps onto the wooden gallows built just for him outside the Delaware Correctional Center tonight after midnight, it will be a grim end to a grim story.Bailey, 49, is one of 14 inmates awaiting death on Delaware -- a surprisingly large number for a tiny state with only three counties. He will be the first person in 50 years in Delaware to die by hanging, and he may be the last. This method of execution is considered so brutal that only four states use it and all four offer lethal injection as an alternative.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | January 15, 1994
TOKYO -- Hidden within the thick walls of Japanese prisons, the gallows have been swinging again, ending the longest hiatus in executions in 800 years.After more than three years without any capital punishment, seven criminals are believed to have been hanged last year. The authorities won't talk about it.Evidence comes from tiny facts laboriously collected by anti-death penalty activists, commonly referred to here as abolitionists, and from indefatigable news organizations.A limited confirmation will only emerge when the Ministry of Justice releases a dry statistical report on 1993 criminal activity in forthcoming months.
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