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By John Dorsey 8 | January 25, 1992
J. Carter Brown, the director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington for the past 22 years and one of the most visible figures on the national art scene, will retire by the end of the year, it was announced yesterday.Mr. Brown, 57, said he was retiring to devote more time to his family and his many other cultural and educational activities.The third and longest-serving director of the 51-year-old institution, Mr. Brown was appointed in 1969 when only 34 years old. He has piloted the gallery through major changes including the addition of the East Building by I. M. Pei; a tremendous increase in attendance, budget ($3.2 million to $52.3 million)
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By Mike Giuliano | July 3, 2013
The National Gallery of Art's "Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909-1929: When Art Danced with Music" is a must-see exhibit for dance fans. This exceptionally beautiful exhibit takes you step by step through one of the great periods in dance history. A distant era is made to seem fresh again. Dance is such an ephemeral art form that a great performance one night typically exists only as a memory by the next night. Today's dance companies fortunately are good about filming performances and maintaining a visual archive, but there were major companies and performers in the early 20th century that now seem more legendary than real.
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By William M. Waters | January 3, 1991
THE DRIVE to work had been more relaxing than usual. Instead of teaching four classes of high school English, I would be busing to Washington to see the Frederick E. Church exhibit at the National Gallery of Art. What's more, I would be accompanying a dear friend and colleague, Joe Abromaitis -- affectionately known on campus as Mr. A.Joe retired as a commercial artist some years back and now substituted often in the Art Department at Notre Dame Prep....
NEWS
April 15, 2013
The proposed partnership announced earlier this month between the University of Maryland College Park and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington is one of the more unusual ideas floated in recent years, not least because it would involve Maryland's flagship university investing in a privately owned institution located outside the state. Yet from what is known of the plan so far the potential benefits for both UM and the Corcoran could far outweigh the risks involved in such an arrangement, and for that reason it's worth exploring further.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 21, 2005
Roy Lichtenstein was one of the most important figures of the pop art movement of the 1960s. Lichtenstein's clever paintings, drawings and sculpture based on comic-book images taught an art world used to the high seriousness of abstract-expressionism that art could also be fun. So when the National Gallery of Art announced this month that the artist's family had donated more than a dozen of his drawings to the museum in memory of Jane Meyerhoff, the...
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2004
Jane Meyerhoff, a collector whose knowing eye led her, with her husband, Robert, to assemble one of the country's major collections of latter 20th-century art, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after heart surgery. She was 80. When the Meyerhoffs announced in 1987 that they would donate their collection to the National Gallery of Art, it was called the institution's largest single gift -- estimated at more than $300 million -- after those from its founding benefactors, who included Andrew Mellon.
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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 4, 2004
There are two schools of thought about museum design in America today. One is that a museum should be a passive container for the art collection on display inside. The second is that a museum should be an integral part of the collection - perhaps even its most important work. A new exhibit about the museums designed by architect and artist Frank O. Gehry shows why his buildings consistently fall into the second category - and why Gehry has received worldwide acclaim for creating them.
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
A discreet blue sign on a Baltimore County road marks the entry to Fitz-hugh Farm. The asphalt driveway wends through fields still yellowed by winter. It curves through the 300-acre farm, past bay and chestnut thoroughbreds, mustard-hued stables and finally, to a low, gray house.It is here that Robert and Jane Meyerhoff have created a personal monument, spectacular in size and serenity, to their two greatest passions outside of family: thoroughbred racehorses and art.Visitors are ushered into an airy living room furnished with sofas and chairs arranged in conversational enclaves and tables laden with art books and magazines.
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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The most obvious sign of success for a blockbuster art show is a long line outside the museum, early and late, rain or shine. A less obvious sign, but at least indicative of a good run, is a line of any significant length at the ladies' room: It suggests there are a lot of people in the museum.All signs were positive at the National Gallery of Art earlier this week following Sunday's opening of "Picasso The Early Years, 1892-1906.""Our guard [on Monday] clocked in 1,200 in the first hour," said Deborah Ziska, the gallery's information officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT | June 22, 2000
Pictures for America In "Norman Rockwell: Pictures for the American People," Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art presents the first comprehensive exhibit of the artist's work since his death in 1978, including more than 70 oil paintings and all 322 of his Saturday Evening Post covers. The Corcoran Gallery of Art is at 500 17th St., N,W., in Washington. Hours are Wednesday-Monday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Tuesdays. Open until 9 p.m. Wednesday-Friday July 1-Sept. 1. Tickets are $10 adults, $8 seniors and students, $4 children under 12 weekdays; $12 adults, $10 seniors and students, $4 children under 12 weekends.
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By Katie V. Jones | January 12, 2012
The headless figure in the "cow face" yoga position, made of porcelain clay, still needs its arm fixed and a few touch-ups before Lauren Siminski hollows it out and sands it. For now, it sits calmly on a table, surrounded by other projects in Century High School's art room, awaiting its time to be baked and glazed. The figure will be the largest of the eight statues of women doing yoga poses that Siminski will create for her AP portfolio, and it'll be the one she presents at the end of her high school seminar at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. "It's going to be on display, and I didn't want it to be really small," said Siminski, 17. "Most of the people are doing paintings.
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By Mike Giuliano | December 30, 2011
War is hell, but it seems beautiful in the textiles hanging on the walls of Washington's National Gallery of Art in the exhibit "The Invention of Glory: Afonso V and the Pastrana Tapestries. " Celebrating that Portuguese Catholic king's victory over a Muslim army in North Africa in 1471, they're a gloriously woven testament to his military might. "The tapestries are a political statement about the power of the king, but they're also an expression of the Portuguese people," said Nino Brito, Portuguese ambassador to the United States, at the media unveiling of this temporary exhibit.
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By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2008
Audrey Schiminger has an eye for art. Since she was a preschooler, she has spent time doodling and drawing pictures. By the time she was in first grade, she was taking her first formal drawing classes. "I like to be put in situations where I am given a chance to be creative," said Schiminger, 15, of Forest Hill. "Art gives me a chance to be creative, with no guidelines." Her parents enrolled her in a class in first grade, and nine years later, she draws and paints every day. Although she doesn't create art for the accolades, she has won more than her share of contests.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 2008
Charles Parkhurst, a museum director in Baltimore and Washington and one of the "monuments men," an Allied Forces team that chased down leads, pried open crates and snooped around museums, salt mines and castles in search of art stolen by the Nazis during World War II, died Thursday at his home in Amherst, Mass. He was 95. His death was confirmed by his wife, Carol Clark. From 1962 to 1970, Mr. Parkhurst was director of the Baltimore Museum of Art. Mr. Parkhurst's tenure in Baltimore was marked by a $5 million to $7 million increase in the worth of the museum's collection, a figure he estimated in a 1973 Sun article.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 14, 2008
Robert Rauschenberg, the multifaceted artist who pioneered a new sense of openness and unlimited possibility in American painting, sculpture, photography and printmaking, died Monday at his home in Captiva Island, Fla. He was 82. Mr. Rauschenberg was an artistic polymath whose interests spanned the visual arts, music and dance. He was most famous for transforming ordinary objects such as bedsheets, newspaper scraps and stuffed animals into mischievously ingenious creations that defied conventional notions of what artworks should be. "He had an extraordinary understanding of the potential of everyday objects to redefine the art of today," said Darcie Alexander, senior curator of contemporary art at the Baltimore Museum of Art. "It's almost impossible to trace the legacy of someone like Rauschenberg, whose presence is still being felt in the work of artists today."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Glenn McNatt and Laura Barnhardt and Glenn McNatt,Sun reporters | February 27, 2008
Philanthropist Robert E. Meyerhoff built seven galleries in a house with windows overlooking grazing horses on his northern Baltimore County farm to display a postmodern art collection that experts call one of the world's finest. Now he wants to give the public a chance to see the works by artists such as Roy Lichtenstein and Jasper Johns by opening a museum in the rural setting. "We don't want it in storage," Meyerhoff said of the collection, after a Baltimore County Council meeting yesterday during which lawmakers discussed a measure that would allow the museum to operate in an area designated for agriculture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | November 18, 1999
Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art presents "To Conserve a Legacy," an extraordinary selection of American paintings, prints, drawings, photographs and sculpture from the collections of historically black colleges and universities, beginning Saturday. Artists represented include Aaron Douglas, Arthur Dove, Lois Mailou Jones, Jacob Lawrence, Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz.The project, organized by the Addison Gallery of American Art and the Studio Museum of Harlem, was developed to conserve, document and present more than 150 works of art owned by Clark Atlanta University, Fisk University, Hampton University, Howard University, North Carolina Central University and Tuskegee University.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | June 25, 2006
For years, the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum seemed destined to live in the shadow of Washington's better known museums. People may have been vaguely aware that Gilbert Stuart's depiction of George Washington hung at the Portrait Gallery (and most left it at that), while the paintings and sculptures at the American Art Museum rarely attracted the attention enjoyed by their flashier counterparts at the National Gallery of Art, the Phillips Collection or the Corcoran Gallery of Art. PORTRAIT GALLERY AND THE SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM / / 8th and F streets, N.W., in Washington / / reopen to the public July 1 / / 202-633-1000
NEWS
December 30, 2007
TELEVISION LAW & ORDER / / 9 p.m. Wednesday. WBAL-TV (Channel 11). ....................... The longest-running cop drama on television returns for its 18th season this week with lots of changes. Jack McCoy (Sam Waterston) is the new district attorney, and Detective Edward Green (Jesse L. Martin) has a new partner, Cyrus Lupo (Jeremy Sisto). There are a couple of new assistant DAs as well: Connie Rubirosa (Alana De La Garza) and Michael Cutter (Linus Roache). Happily, Lt. Anita Van Buren (S. Epatha Merkerson)
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | October 13, 2007
Leave aside for the moment whether Annie Leibovitz is a great artist and focus instead on what she undoubtedly is: a terrific celebrity portrait photographer - maybe, in the post-Richard Avedon era, the best there is. After seeing Annie Leibovitz: A Photographer's Life, 1990-2005, the 15-year retrospective of Leibovitz's commercial and personal work that opens today at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, I've got to confess I'm tired of hearing people...
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