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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
The Maryland Natural Resources Police recovered the body of a missing boater from Tenthouse Creek in southern Anne Arundel County at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday. Police had been searching by air and water for Dean Dixon, 52, since his unoccupied vessel was found Tuesday afternoon on the creek's shoreline, near the 4700 block of Bayfields Road in Galesville. Dixon had left his home in Galesville at about 5 a.m. Tuesday to go crabbing and had last spoken to his family by cellphone at 11:00 a.m., police said.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2013
The cinder block dugouts are decrepit and the backstop is ragged at the old baseball diamond in Galesville, but giants once ran the bases in this southern Anne Arundel County town. Not just giants but Elite Giants, as in the old Negro Leagues team of the 1930s and 1940s. They and other legendary clubs from era of segregated baseball — such as the Homestead Grays and Newark Eagles — were annual visitors to play exhibitions at the home of the Galesville Hot Sox. Scores of local residents turned out Sunday to remember those days and celebrate the preservation of a vibrant part of Anne Arundel's African-American history at a first-pitch ceremony marking the county's acquisition of the Hot Sox Field at Wilson Park.
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NEWS
By Nick Cafferky, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Three teens accused of trying to firebomb a Galesville home are facing attempted murder and arson charges, Anne Arundel County fire officials said Thursday. Following a phone call reporting a suspicious package on the 900 block of Galesville Road June 1, fire investigators from the county fire department arrived at the scene to find a box with the two incendiary devices, along with two damaged cars. On June 6, the County Fire and Explosive Investigators executed a search warrant on the home of Alexander Lare, 17, in Churchton, where Lare and Crystal Kalinowski, 19, were taken into custody.
NEWS
By Nick Cafferky, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Three teens accused of trying to firebomb a Galesville home are facing attempted murder and arson charges, Anne Arundel County fire officials said Thursday. Following a phone call reporting a suspicious package on the 900 block of Galesville Road June 1, fire investigators from the county fire department arrived at the scene to find a box with the two incendiary devices, along with two damaged cars. On June 6, the County Fire and Explosive Investigators executed a search warrant on the home of Alexander Lare, 17, in Churchton, where Lare and Crystal Kalinowski, 19, were taken into custody.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2011
She fell in love with ballet as a child, as many young girls do, and Susan Savage didn't lack for promise. She learned her first plies and pirouettes at a feeder school for the Royal Academy of Dance in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. But when she turned 13, her family pulled up roots and moved to West Texas, a part of the world known more for football than for fouettes en tournant (spins with a sideway kick). "Not exactly a hotbed for my life's passion," she says. Fifty years later, Savage got a chance to return to the pastime she never got out of her system.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | June 14, 1991
Five years ago, county officials stormed into Galesville like bulls in a china shop.The small waterfront community had problems disposing of its sewage, they said. Nearly half the septic fields were failing, and children were playing in open sewage ditches.It needed sewer service. Right then. Right away."They came inhere, saying, 'You gotta do this' and 'You gotta do that,' " recalled Bill Woodfield, president of the West River Community Association. "People didn't like it much."Its back against a wall, Galesville politely declined.
NEWS
By Rochelle McConkie and Rochelle McConkie,sun reporter | July 1, 2007
There won't be any fireworks in Galesville this year. And, the town's oldest resident, Agnes "Miss Agnes" Dixon, is just fine with that. "It was too many people coming into our little village," said Dixon, who celebrated her 103rd birthday June 4. "It was getting out of hand." With about 5,000 people overrunning the South County community - population 600 - to watch fireworks over the West River, the community has decided to end the 12-year tradition. The volunteers at the Galesville Heritage Society said the celebration isn't kaput: The annual parade down Main Street, known for its homemade floats, will begin at 2 p.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | September 6, 1991
Confronted with failing septic systems and other waste-water problems, Galesville residents will decide next week if they want a proposed$6 million sewerage system.Wednesday night, residents asked the county to help alleviate their primary fear: population growth that sewer service could bring to the tiny West River community.The West River Community Association asked county officials to establish a citizen-based growth management committee, similar to thoseinvestigating development in Parole and Odenton.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | October 25, 1992
GALESVILLE -- From the Quaker Burying Ground to the water's edge, Main Street stretches a mile, and the peninsula it sits on is not even that wide. That's it, that's Galesville, that's all there is to the southern Anne Arundel County town that has lived more than three centuries by the banks of the West River.Three-hundred-forty years, to be exact. And the people who live in Galesville and the people who love it gathered yesterday to celebrate Galesville Grant Day, marking Oct. 28, 1652, the day four colonists were granted the 660 acres where the town was founded.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | October 24, 1991
Residents of Galesville, a historic waterman's community on the WestRiver, have agreed to connect to public sewerage if the county helpsthem control growth.The county Department of Utilities has received 124 resident petitions in favor of a $5.3 million sewer system, easily exceeding the 113 petitions needed for approval, said utilitiesspokeswoman Jody Vollmar.So far, 50 residents have opposed the sewer system, which will cost homeowners $3,300 each in connection charges as well as annual fees based on the size of their properties.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
In a bygone era, Galesville's house-size stores — mostly trading in household goods for this rural town — were miniature economic engines of the community. They were also places in the southern Anne Arundel County town where people gathered with their neighbors, catching up on news and playing checkers. Now the old culture and commerce in this village of about 200 households feels like ancient history. Advocates are working to preserve recollections and mementos from a time before residents were accustomed to traveling miles by car to shopping centers.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
The Maryland Natural Resources Police recovered the body of a missing boater from Tenthouse Creek in southern Anne Arundel County at 7:30 a.m. Wednesday. Police had been searching by air and water for Dean Dixon, 52, since his unoccupied vessel was found Tuesday afternoon on the creek's shoreline, near the 4700 block of Bayfields Road in Galesville. Dixon had left his home in Galesville at about 5 a.m. Tuesday to go crabbing and had last spoken to his family by cellphone at 11:00 a.m., police said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2011
She fell in love with ballet as a child, as many young girls do, and Susan Savage didn't lack for promise. She learned her first plies and pirouettes at a feeder school for the Royal Academy of Dance in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. But when she turned 13, her family pulled up roots and moved to West Texas, a part of the world known more for football than for fouettes en tournant (spins with a sideway kick). "Not exactly a hotbed for my life's passion," she says. Fifty years later, Savage got a chance to return to the pastime she never got out of her system.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2010
She remembers it as though it were yesterday — the rows of fresh-faced students, the stern but caring teachers, the potbelly stove in the two-room building. And for Gertrude Makell, the homework never seemed to stop: arithmetic, spelling, history. That was 54 years ago, when Makell was a third-grader at the tiny Galesville Colored Elementary School, the only grade school then open to African-American children in the rural town on the water. Today, she's poised to make some history of her own. Workers will soon complete a mission Makell dreamed up seven years ago — the full restoration of the structure, which started its life as a one-room schoolhouse in 1929, marked several key stages of African-American history and anchored Galesville's black community for generations.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | April 20, 2008
Some 15 miles south of Annapolis lies Galesville, a quiet country village with aspirations of staying that way. Here's where people know your pets' names and your children's whereabouts. With no mail delivery for the 500 or so residents, the village post office and nearby businesses are gathering places, especially as the weather warms. Galesville occupies 660 acres, just over a square mile, a peninsula enveloped by Tenthouse and Lerch creeks and West River. "My husband and I like to walk down to the water and see if we can see the Bay Bridge," said Adrianne Day, who moved there with her family seven years ago for a love of the water, village life and the Saturday morning strolls.
NEWS
By Kimberly Marselas and Kimberly Marselas,Special to The Sun | February 13, 2008
She's 70 now, but Pauline Watkins' crystalline blue eyes still light up when she thinks of her move to Galesville at the age of 7. She and her family - 23 children strong - followed their father out from Annapolis when he took a job shucking oysters and cutting fish for Woodfield Fish & Oyster Co. Many of her siblings followed in their father's footsteps, working grueling, labor-intensive shifts, then returning to their small home to rest. On a peninsula rich in history, if poor in other ways, the Watkins were part of a thriving black community.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | June 20, 1995
In sleepy Galesville, where nodding at passing boats is the unofficial pastime, one boat wins wide smiles and enthusiastic waves.It's the Magic Moment, a sleek handmade craft, certainly the only gondola on West River and perhaps the only one in Maryland."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
In a bygone era, Galesville's house-size stores — mostly trading in household goods for this rural town — were miniature economic engines of the community. They were also places in the southern Anne Arundel County town where people gathered with their neighbors, catching up on news and playing checkers. Now the old culture and commerce in this village of about 200 households feels like ancient history. Advocates are working to preserve recollections and mementos from a time before residents were accustomed to traveling miles by car to shopping centers.
NEWS
By Rochelle McConkie and Rochelle McConkie,sun reporter | July 1, 2007
There won't be any fireworks in Galesville this year. And, the town's oldest resident, Agnes "Miss Agnes" Dixon, is just fine with that. "It was too many people coming into our little village," said Dixon, who celebrated her 103rd birthday June 4. "It was getting out of hand." With about 5,000 people overrunning the South County community - population 600 - to watch fireworks over the West River, the community has decided to end the 12-year tradition. The volunteers at the Galesville Heritage Society said the celebration isn't kaput: The annual parade down Main Street, known for its homemade floats, will begin at 2 p.m. Wednesday.
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