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NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
Mark Marini celebrated his 19th birthday yesterday with Maryland state troopers yelling in his face. "Pee Wee!," roared Tfc. Robert Mondor. "When was the last time you cleaned your ears? Did you use a Q-tip?" Mondor yelled into Marini's right ear as the young man lined up with other cadets in a cafeteria at the Maryland State Police Academy in Pikesville. Marini stood at attention. "Sir! Yes, sir!" he responded before proceeding through the chow line in choreographed steps. Marini is among 10 cadets who were integrated with 32 trooper candidates going through the first week of training at the academy.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | October 29, 2000
Q. Several years ago my husband was suffering from psoriasis on his arms and legs. Medicine from the dermatologist was not very helpful. I bought some flaxseed oil capsules in the health food store. My husband was skeptical, but by the time he finished the first bottle, we could see improvement. He has continued with flaxseed oil and is still free of scabs. I don't know why it works, but others might want to know about it. A. Thanks for sharing your husband's experience. This oil, similar to fish oil, is rich in essential fatty acids, especially alpha linolenic and linoleic.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 1996
My 11-year-old son is always complaining his tummy hurts. Can a child his age have an ulcer?Ulcers are much rarer in children than in adults, but they do occur. An ulcer is a deep sore in the lining (called mucosa) of the stomach or upper intestine. The most common place for an ulcer is in the duodenum, the first segment of the intestine.Most children who get ulcers have some other chronic health problem that weakens the system or requires medicine that can promote the formation of ulcers as an unfortunate side effect.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2005
There's a trainer at my gym who's always working out in thick sweat pants. He's really fit and seems to know exactly what he's doing when it comes to everything from the chest press to wind sprints. If you want to lose weight this way, how exactly would heavy clothes help shed the pounds? If you're trying to "make weight" for the next season of The Contender, that's one thing. For everyone else, working out in heavy clothing is a mistake. Why? The extra weight you're shedding through perspiration is water weight.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 8, 2002
House approves bill that would double limit on small claims The House of Delegates unanimously approved a bill yesterday that would make it easier for people to go to small claims court. The measure would increase the monetary amount for which a person could sue in small claims court from $2,500 to $5,000. Disputes involving more than that amount often are heard in Circuit Court, where many defendants and plaintiffs feel that they need a lawyer to navigate the complicated and often clogged system.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | August 24, 2005
Despite a smattering of government initiatives to curb the trend, Americans continued to gain weight last year. The adult obesity rate inched up to 24.5 percent from 23.7 percent in 2003, a new report says. More than a quarter of adults in 10 states are obese, and seven of those 10 states are in the Southeast. Colorado had the lowest adult obesity rate, at 16.8 percent. Maryland ranked 29th with rate of 21.7 percent. Co-written by former Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening, the report was the second such annual report released by the Trust for America's Health, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit, nonpartisan health advocacy organization.
NEWS
January 26, 2009
Women are less able to suppress hunger Faced with their favorite foods, women are less able than men to suppress their hunger, a discovery that may help explain the higher obesity rate for females, a new study suggests. Gene-Jack Wang of Brookhaven National Laboratory and his colleagues were trying to figure out why some people overeat and gain weight while others don't. They performed brain scans on 13 women and 10 men who had fasted overnight to determine how their brains responded to the sight of their favorite foods.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
The University of Maryland basketball team received good and bad news last week regarding its two incoming recruits: Forward Terence Morris of Frederick finally received the college board score he needed for eligibility as a freshman, but guard Juan Dixon of Baltimore did not.It means that Morris, pending the approval of his score later this summer by the national clearinghouse, will likely play for the Terrapins next season. Dixon, who can still try to gain his eligibility for the spring semester beginning in January, might redshirt.
FEATURES
By Joyce Hendley and Joyce Hendley,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | July 22, 1993
As a young man watches his slim fiancee approvingly from a distance, an old man shatters his reverie. "Better look now," he warns. "After the first kid, she's gonna blow up like a balloon."Thus did the 1989 movie "True Love" immortalize the stereotype that after marriage, and especially after having children, only women, not men, gain weight. But a new study suggests that exactly the opposite may be true: Marriage, pure and simple, causes men to put on weight.When researchers at Cornell University analyzed weight and marriage data from 3,025 men and women, they found that both married men and women tend to be heavier than their single counterparts.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - There was the torn labrum, the chipped bone, the groin injury, the problematic rotator cuff. Each has taken a toll on Maryland outside linebacker Matt Robinson , testing his body and his will. Seasons come and go for Robinson, but injuries often linger. When spring comes, he often is still healing from the year before. But this season, the savvy rising senior is healthy. As much as any Maryland player, Robinson was eager to greet the arrival of spring practice Saturday.
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