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NEWS
By NEWSDAY | August 24, 2005
Despite a smattering of government initiatives to curb the trend, Americans continued to gain weight last year. The adult obesity rate inched up to 24.5 percent from 23.7 percent in 2003, a new report says. More than a quarter of adults in 10 states are obese, and seven of those 10 states are in the Southeast. Colorado had the lowest adult obesity rate, at 16.8 percent. Maryland ranked 29th with rate of 21.7 percent. Co-written by former Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening, the report was the second such annual report released by the Trust for America's Health, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit, nonpartisan health advocacy organization.
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NEWS
January 26, 2009
Women are less able to suppress hunger Faced with their favorite foods, women are less able than men to suppress their hunger, a discovery that may help explain the higher obesity rate for females, a new study suggests. Gene-Jack Wang of Brookhaven National Laboratory and his colleagues were trying to figure out why some people overeat and gain weight while others don't. They performed brain scans on 13 women and 10 men who had fasted overnight to determine how their brains responded to the sight of their favorite foods.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
The University of Maryland basketball team received good and bad news last week regarding its two incoming recruits: Forward Terence Morris of Frederick finally received the college board score he needed for eligibility as a freshman, but guard Juan Dixon of Baltimore did not.It means that Morris, pending the approval of his score later this summer by the national clearinghouse, will likely play for the Terrapins next season. Dixon, who can still try to gain his eligibility for the spring semester beginning in January, might redshirt.
FEATURES
By Joyce Hendley and Joyce Hendley,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | July 22, 1993
As a young man watches his slim fiancee approvingly from a distance, an old man shatters his reverie. "Better look now," he warns. "After the first kid, she's gonna blow up like a balloon."Thus did the 1989 movie "True Love" immortalize the stereotype that after marriage, and especially after having children, only women, not men, gain weight. But a new study suggests that exactly the opposite may be true: Marriage, pure and simple, causes men to put on weight.When researchers at Cornell University analyzed weight and marriage data from 3,025 men and women, they found that both married men and women tend to be heavier than their single counterparts.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - There was the torn labrum, the chipped bone, the groin injury, the problematic rotator cuff. Each has taken a toll on Maryland outside linebacker Matt Robinson , testing his body and his will. Seasons come and go for Robinson, but injuries often linger. When spring comes, he often is still healing from the year before. But this season, the savvy rising senior is healthy. As much as any Maryland player, Robinson was eager to greet the arrival of spring practice Saturday.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1996
Are there any surgical treatments for obesity?Over the years a number of surgical procedures have been used to treat obesity either by restricting the intake of food or by reducing its absorption from the intestine.One of the simplest methods is to wire the jaws shut so that the diet is limited to liquids taken through a straw. Although this approach generally leads to weight loss (the author of this column managed to gain weight when his jaws were wired shut for a broken jaw), weight is usually regained as soon as the wires are removed.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 26, 2008
As he's been doing for nearly the past 50 years, Eddie Jacobs opens his own door in downtown Baltimore for another business day. He answers his own phone (the number has not changed in nearly 70 years) and mails his own paperwork. The man who sells suits as they looked in the 1950s is proud of his merchandise's permanence. He believes in classic clothes with good linings, reliable wool fabric and pants with a proper rise. He owns no blue jeans and will not discuss the grunge look. His sales technique is as soft as the shoulders in one of his Southwick suits.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1999
Choking back tears at an emotional news conference, Hall of Fame running back Walter Payton announced yesterday that he is suffering from a rare disease and will need a liver transplant to survive.Payton, 44, has a disease called primary sclerosing cholangitis, an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system attacks its own tissues and scars the bile ducts. It affects only three of 100,000 people.The most obvious symptom is that Payton has lost a lot of weight. His gaunt appearance was a shocking contrast to the well-sculptured look he had when he became the NFL's all-time leading rusher for the Chicago Bears.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
When Carole Morison got into poultry farming 23 years ago, she and her husband built chicken houses on their Pocomoke farm to specifications set by their biggest customer — Perdue Inc. — and made upgrades the industry giant required over the years. That relationship abruptly ended two years ago, when Morison refused to spend $150,000 on a permanent enclosure requested by Salisbury-based Perdue, which in her view would be too costly and unhealthy for the chickens. Perdue subsequently dropped Morison as a grower.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
When Kristy Matthai trots on the field for Westminster this week in the state field hockey tournament, it will be the continuation of a touching story of a driven teen-ager who has overcome a serious eating disorder to pursue a field hockey career.A little more than two years ago when it was discovered that Matthai had anorexia, she had to decide whether she wanted to remain painfully thin at 5 feet 6, 100 pounds or gain a mandated 15 pounds to play field hockey again.After many tears, battles with her parents, therapy, working with a nutritionist and doctor, and finally a threat from her mother (Linda)
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