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By Gerri Kobren | March 26, 1991
Gail Williams-Glasser used to cope with stress by smoking; when she stopped smoking 10 years ago, she stumbled onto a different kind of relief:"I'd get up and leave the room," she says. "I would go and walk up and down the steps."From indoor steps she moved to outdoor walks, and then began to jog, gradually extending her distance to 16 miles.In the process, she became an oddity -- an ex-smoker who did not gain weight.According to a recent report in the New England Journal of Medicine, that's unusual.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2011
When Mark Turgeon was asked about his frontcourt Monday, Maryland's men's basketball coach inhaled deeply like a swimmer about to take an underwater plunge. Five weeks after replacing the retired Gary Williams, Turgeon knows his young team has issues pronounced enough that he felt compelled to say more than once: "I didn't sign a one-year contract. " Turgeon, who signed an eight-year deal, has only nine scholarship players, four shy of the limit. His only senior, guard Sean Mosley — who struggled with his shot last season — is in a walking boot after seriously spraining his ankle in a pickup game with teammates.
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Coaches and managers had long tried to get him to lose weight. His already slim wife went through a rigorous diet clinic with him for moral support. And fans offered their own brand of "encouragement," heckling him from the stands for being "a fat pig."But as any overweight person can tell you, no one can lose the weight for you. Nor can the motivation to lose weight come from the outside, be it well-meaning or mean-spirited or something in between."You get used to it after a while," Orioles pitcher Sid Fernandez says of the weight-baiting that has followed him through much of his life.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
There are always studies showing how many people are obese and overweight. Well if more places around the world had free classes, such as yoga or biking, more people would be out getting into shape. It all comes down to money: People who have enough money can buy memberships in order to work out, but people that lack money are unable to do so. When one doesn't work out they will only gain weight. No matter how healthy you eat, there are many factors that contribute to how healthy you live in life.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Sun Reporter // Weather Blogger | February 25, 2010
F rank Kaufmann of Towson is puzzled: "Twice ... in the aftermath of our recent snowstorms, I've heard [TV reporters] say that, as snow melts and refreezes, it weighs MORE ... How can it GAIN weight ?" It can't. As it melts, or sublimates (from solid to vapor), snow loses weight . But it can become denser - heavier per unit of volume. Example: As snow on the roof melts, water runs to the gutters, where it freezes and builds a solid ice dam. The weight, concentrated in the gutters, can bring them down.
FEATURES
By Media Tribune News Service | May 26, 1992
Smokers who want to kick the habit should not let the fear of gaining weight stop them. Researchers have found that most ex-smokers gain weight quickly, but after two years they tend to lose about half of what they gained."
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | February 16, 1993
Do you believe that you can't gain weight on a high carbohydrate diet?This modern nutrition idea becomes myth-information when carried to extremes.Recently, the Gatorade Sports Science Institute sponsored a discussion among four experts in the area of exercise, weight control and nutrition.Their responses were based on research which suggests that, while there are many advantages to a high carbohydrate diet, too much of even that good thing will result in unwanted weight gain.William D. McArdle, textbook author and professor of health and physical education at Queens College of the City University of New York, summed it up this way: " . . . it is much more efficient to store calories from dietary fat as body fat than to store an excess of carbohydrates as fat. . . . However, I still think it should be stressed that excess calories, regardless of the source, will ultimately be stored as fat."
FEATURES
By Carrie Donovan and Carrie Donovan,New York Times News Service | May 7, 1992
It's time to turn a cool shoulder. Some of the newest dresses, sweaters and shirts are designed to leave this part of the anatomy on display."It's the most sensual part of a woman's body," says Donna Karan. Some might disagree with the designer, though no one could miss the provocative aspects of her new dresses and sweaters that have cutout shoulders, but high turtlenecks and long sleeves.There are lots of other daytime designs that feature extra-wide necklines, which have a tendency to slip off one shoulder in a degage manner.
FEATURES
November 6, 1990
As the holidays approach, there are taste temptations all around us. Americans often gain weight during November and December, only to go on a weight-loss program after New Year's Day.The Evening Sun would like to know, first, whether you believe you are overweight, underweight or at the perfect weight.Secondly, we'd like to know if you have been on a diet any time during 1990.Finally, we'd like to know if you plan to go on a diet after the holidays.To register your opinions, call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's free directory of telephone information services at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County)
NEWS
June 2, 2011
There are always studies showing how many people are obese and overweight. Well if more places around the world had free classes, such as yoga or biking, more people would be out getting into shape. It all comes down to money: People who have enough money can buy memberships in order to work out, but people that lack money are unable to do so. When one doesn't work out they will only gain weight. No matter how healthy you eat, there are many factors that contribute to how healthy you live in life.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2010
When Shelby Saum first met Joseph Ayers through a game-playing club, neither one of them had a weight problem. But the Hampden couple sure did 12 years and three children later. There they were last year, Shelby, 35 and an Army contractor, inching toward 300 pounds and hardly able to think about anything else. And Joe, 39 and managing operations for Direct TV, popping blood pressure pills and pulling up at drive-through windows. Joe simply ate too much and the wrong things.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Sun Reporter // Weather Blogger | February 25, 2010
F rank Kaufmann of Towson is puzzled: "Twice ... in the aftermath of our recent snowstorms, I've heard [TV reporters] say that, as snow melts and refreezes, it weighs MORE ... How can it GAIN weight ?" It can't. As it melts, or sublimates (from solid to vapor), snow loses weight . But it can become denser - heavier per unit of volume. Example: As snow on the roof melts, water runs to the gutters, where it freezes and builds a solid ice dam. The weight, concentrated in the gutters, can bring them down.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
For many people, the start of the new year means the start of a new diet. But most people will ultimately fail in their efforts to lose weight, says Dr. Lawrence J. Cheskin, founder and director of the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center. A New Year's resolution to lose weight is a good step, according to Cheskin, associate professor of international health (human nutrition) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. But it's simply the first step in what must be a life-changing strategy to shed pounds and keep them off. What is the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center?
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 26, 2008
Inconvenient truth: Phone book is waste The new phone books that we'll never use arrived the other day, just in time to replace the old phone books we never used. The new books came in a plastic bag placed next to the mailbox and included the Verizon Greater Baltimore White Pages, the Verizon Greater Baltimore Suburban East Yellow Pages and what appeared to be a shrunken edition of the Verizon Greater Baltimore Suburban East Yellow Pages that seemed to contain much of the same information as its bulked-up cousin.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | January 30, 2007
Two stories that slipped under the radar recently, one hopeful, one not so much, provide yet another window into the soul of where high school athletics are and where they might be headed. A new Iowa State University study of 251 Iowa high school football teams found that 9 percent of the linemen on those squads in the 2005 season had body mass indexes (or BMI) that could qualify as adult-class obesity, which suggests that we're willing to put our kids' health at risk earlier and earlier in the name of supposedly making them better.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 16, 2005
MY COMFORTER is calling me, and I can't resist its siren song. It calls to me as soon as the sun sets, and it whispers to me at dawn. It sings to me, and its lullaby is irresistible. It has deceptive power, this down comforter in its pale blue duvet cover. Though light as a feather, it might as well be chain mail, so helpless am I to escape the weight of it on me. But then I do not struggle very hard. My comforter carries some kind of number that lets you know how warm, warmer, warmest it is. It is called "fill weight" -- no attempt to sugarcoat things here -- and the numbers range from 550 to 650. I think that refers to how many geese are now naked so that I may be warm, but I do not know for sure.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | January 21, 1992
During exercise, certain structural abnormalities can stress certain parts of your body excessively, thereby increasing your chances of suffering a sports-related injury.The most common biomechanical factor that causes injury is improper rolling of the foot once it has struck the ground. This condition, known as excessive pronation, can afflict anyone in a sport that involves running -- from track and field to football.When you run, you land on the outside bottom of your foot. You then roll toward the inside.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | May 16, 2004
I have spinal stenosis. My lower spine doesn't hurt, but I have no mobility. I'm 80 years old and in good health otherwise. I do exercises each morning like marching and bending my knees. I would like to know what other exercises I could do. Spinal stenosis -- the narrowing of the spinal canal -- can squeeze the nerve roots in the spine or the spinal cord itself. This pinching can weaken the lower body and cause numbness and / or severe leg pain. While it's good news that you are pain-free, physical therapist Jennifer Kline of Physiotherapy Associates in Lutherville strongly recommends meeting with a trainer or physical therapist to begin a flexibility program.
FEATURES
By Craig Outhier and Craig Outhier,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 13, 2004
The story, like an old VHS tape, has undoubtedly been distorted by years of repeated use, but here goes: It's 1975. Dustin Hoffman is on the set of John Schlesinger's Marathon Man, running wind sprints to prepare for a scene that calls for his character to appear flushed and out of breath. Seeing his young co-star jog up and down the street for no apparent reason, Laurence Olivier - the wizened Pharaoh of British theater - haughtily asks Hoffman to explain himself. When Hoffman obliges, Olivier shakes his head and clucks, "Why don't you try acting, my boy?"
NEWS
By Karen Herzog and By Karen Herzog,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 28, 2004
You've sacrificed mashed potatoes and cookies for the good of your waistline, but now the carb-festooned holiday season is here. Do you keep up the good fight against bad carbs or surrender to the Christmas cookies? If you choose the latter, how do you keep from gaining back all the weight you worked so hard to lose? Many Americans apparently are debating these questions, according to the NPD Group research firm, as reported at CNNMoney.com. The percentage of Americans following low-carb diets dropped to 4.6 percent in September from 9 percent in January, NPD Group reported.
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