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By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Gail Devers, three-time Olympic gold medalist and "the Fastest Woman in the World," has a story she wants everyone to know.The year she turned 21, she had just set two American track and field records. But later that year, she became barely able to walk across the room without being winded.She noticed the pigmentation in her skin was fading in spots; then, she says, "My hair started to fall out in clumps, my nails became brittle and layers of my skin were just peeling off. At 21, that's not what you want to look at in the mirror every day."
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By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 26, 2004
ATHENS - He clipped the third and fourth hurdles and smashed the fifth one, flailing at every step of his second-round heat in the 110-meter hurdles. So it was only a matter of time until the hurdles overcame Allen Johnson, instead of his surmounting them. And after bashing into the ninth hurdle yesterday, he fell ingloriously to the track beneath the last hurdle, face-down but able to see his chance at a second gold medal passing him by. "I was a little nervous, but I felt I could get myself back together," said Johnson, 33, the 2003 world champion and 1996 Olympic champion.
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By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- U.S. sprinter Gwen Torrence apparently wasn't referring to her gold-medalist teammate, Gail Devers, when she claimed that three of the women in yesterday's Olympic 100-meter final had been using performance-enhancing drugs.But Devers' coach, Bob Kersee, became incensed upon learning of the charge from a reporter's question at a post-race news conference. He broke off his own interview in an adjoining room and burst into the conference area unannounced.Without even pausing to grab a microphone, Kersee told reporters: "Gail Devers has been drug-tested almost as much as my wife, Jackie Joyner-Kersee.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2003
PALO ALTO, Calif. - "I've got a very good reason to run faster these days," says sprint star Bernard Williams. "I've got another mouth to feed." The "very good reason" is 6-week-old daughter Jadin, the first child of Williams and girlfriend Anjanette Kirkland, the reigning women's world champion in the 100-meter hurdles. Williams, 25, the 2000 Olympic 400-meter relay gold medalist out of Carver and the University of Florida, ran brilliantly yesterday, winning the opening heat of the men's 100-meter dash at the U.S. track and field championships at Stanford University in 10.06 seconds.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 7, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Gail Devers stumbled back into our hearts again last night. Her story could be the Olympic story.First, she recovers from an improbable illness to register a shocking win in the 100 meters. And then, on one of the great nights in American track and field history, just as she's about to win a second gold and confirm her place in Olympic lore, Devers collides with that final hurdle -- and staggers, tumbles, virtually crawls to the finish line. She didn't win, but she finished.
SPORTS
By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 26, 2004
ATHENS - He clipped the third and fourth hurdles and smashed the fifth one, flailing at every step of his second-round heat in the 110-meter hurdles. So it was only a matter of time until the hurdles overcame Allen Johnson, instead of his surmounting them. And after bashing into the ninth hurdle yesterday, he fell ingloriously to the track beneath the last hurdle, face-down but able to see his chance at a second gold medal passing him by. "I was a little nervous, but I felt I could get myself back together," said Johnson, 33, the 2003 world champion and 1996 Olympic champion.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | August 7, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Gwen Torrence and Gail Devers are linked by medals, divided by anger.Last night at the 1992 Summer Olympics, Torrence won the women's 200 meters, held her 2-year-old son in her arms, and wept with joy.Devers smashed into a final barrier in the 100 hurdles, slipped from first to fifth, yet crawled on scraped knees across a finish line.It should have been a glorious evening for two American women, one winning, the other courageously finishing. Instead, it ended in bitter attacks, as Torrence allowed a lingering drug controversy to rage.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2003
PALO ALTO, Calif. - "I've got a very good reason to run faster these days," says sprint star Bernard Williams. "I've got another mouth to feed." The "very good reason" is 6-week-old daughter Jadin, the first child of Williams and girlfriend Anjanette Kirkland, the reigning women's world champion in the 100-meter hurdles. Williams, 25, the 2000 Olympic 400-meter relay gold medalist out of Carver and the University of Florida, ran brilliantly yesterday, winning the opening heat of the men's 100-meter dash at the U.S. track and field championships at Stanford University in 10.06 seconds.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Gail Devers was not distraught after she placed fifth in the 100-meter dash at the U.S. track and field trials for the Olympic Games last Saturday. She won the gold medal in the 100 in 1992 and '96, but now she might actually take in the opening ceremonies in Sydney, Australia. "I've never been to the opening ceremonies," Devers said. "I've always been sitting back in my hotel room, resting and getting ready for the start of the 100 the next day. I can't ever remember marching in the opening ceremony of an Olympics or a world championship.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
ATLANTA -- There's no denying that the track and field competition at the Olympics will be dominated by Michael Johnson's quest to become the first man in its history to win both the 200 meters and 400 meters. But Johnson's story will not be the only one to emerge from the competition that begins today at Olympic Stadium.From the opening rounds of the men's and women's 100-meter dashes this afternoon to the men's marathon a week from Sunday, the spotlight will focus on the thrill of victory and the agony of the heat.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Gail Devers was not distraught after she placed fifth in the 100-meter dash at the U.S. track and field trials for the Olympic Games last Saturday. She won the gold medal in the 100 in 1992 and '96, but now she might actually take in the opening ceremonies in Sydney, Australia. "I've never been to the opening ceremonies," Devers said. "I've always been sitting back in my hotel room, resting and getting ready for the start of the 100 the next day. I can't ever remember marching in the opening ceremony of an Olympics or a world championship.
FEATURES
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1998
Gail Devers, three-time Olympic gold medalist and "the Fastest Woman in the World," has a story she wants everyone to know.The year she turned 21, she had just set two American track and field records. But later that year, she became barely able to walk across the room without being winded.She noticed the pigmentation in her skin was fading in spots; then, she says, "My hair started to fall out in clumps, my nails became brittle and layers of my skin were just peeling off. At 21, that's not what you want to look at in the mirror every day."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1996
ATLANTA -- There's no denying that the track and field competition at the Olympics will be dominated by Michael Johnson's quest to become the first man in its history to win both the 200 meters and 400 meters. But Johnson's story will not be the only one to emerge from the competition that begins today at Olympic Stadium.From the opening rounds of the men's and women's 100-meter dashes this afternoon to the men's marathon a week from Sunday, the spotlight will focus on the thrill of victory and the agony of the heat.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | August 7, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Gwen Torrence and Gail Devers are linked by medals, divided by anger.Last night at the 1992 Summer Olympics, Torrence won the women's 200 meters, held her 2-year-old son in her arms, and wept with joy.Devers smashed into a final barrier in the 100 hurdles, slipped from first to fifth, yet crawled on scraped knees across a finish line.It should have been a glorious evening for two American women, one winning, the other courageously finishing. Instead, it ended in bitter attacks, as Torrence allowed a lingering drug controversy to rage.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 7, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Gail Devers stumbled back into our hearts again last night. Her story could be the Olympic story.First, she recovers from an improbable illness to register a shocking win in the 100 meters. And then, on one of the great nights in American track and field history, just as she's about to win a second gold and confirm her place in Olympic lore, Devers collides with that final hurdle -- and staggers, tumbles, virtually crawls to the finish line. She didn't win, but she finished.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- U.S. sprinter Gwen Torrence apparently wasn't referring to her gold-medalist teammate, Gail Devers, when she claimed that three of the women in yesterday's Olympic 100-meter final had been using performance-enhancing drugs.But Devers' coach, Bob Kersee, became incensed upon learning of the charge from a reporter's question at a post-race news conference. He broke off his own interview in an adjoining room and burst into the conference area unannounced.Without even pausing to grab a microphone, Kersee told reporters: "Gail Devers has been drug-tested almost as much as my wife, Jackie Joyner-Kersee.
SPORTS
August 7, 1992
YesterdayTrack: It was the greatest day in the history of U.S. Olympic track: five events, nine medals, four of them golds. Carl Lewis won a gold medal in the long jump -- his third gold medal in three Olympics. Dave Johnson was a study in courage, finishing third in the decathlon while competing on an ankle with a stress fracture. Kevin Young broke Edwin Moses' 9-year-old record in the 400 meter hurdlers. Gail Devers fell on her last hurdle and lost a certain gold. Gwen Torrence ran a race instead of her mouth as the United States won both the men's and women's 200 meters.
SPORTS
By DAVID SELIG and DAVID SELIG,SUN REPORTER | July 29, 2006
Tony Kiser's coaching expertise has lured many of the area's top hurdlers to the Woodlawn Track Pack. But with this week's USATF National Junior Olympic Track & Field Championships looming, Kiser called on a secret weapon. Three-time Olympic gold medalist Gail Devers visited the club's practice last week, offering the young athletes motivation as well as a little technical advice. USA Track & Field National Junior Olympic Championships Today and tomorrow, Hughes Stadium, Morgan State
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