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By New York Times News Service | December 24, 1992
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin approved yesterday Cabinet put together by Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin that, with a few exceptions, is a replica of the much-maligned government led by Yegor T. Gaidar, a young, reform-minded economist.In holding together the core of the Gaidar team, the Russian leader has accomplished a goal he set with great flair last weekend when he cut short a trip to China to take charge of the appointments.Mr. Chernomyrdin, a 54-year-old Soviet-era technocrat, became prime minister a week ago, when a conservative majority at the Congress of People's Deputies forced Mr. Yeltsin to abandon Mr. Gaidar.
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NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 2006
DUBLIN, IRELAND -- Irish authorities launched an inquiry yesterday into the sudden and violent illness of former Russian Prime Minister Yegor Gaidar, whose aides say might have been the victim of poisoning. Gaidar's illness while attending a conference in Ireland on Nov. 24 appeared to deepen the mystery surrounding the poisoning death a day earlier of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in London, although there was no immediate indication from investigators that the cases were linked.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | December 15, 1992
MOSCOW -- Giving in to a hostile Congress, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin dropped his support of acting Prime Minister Yegor Gaidar yesterday and nominated in his stead a man whose roots are in the old Soviet hierarchy.The visibly unhappy president gave the job of prime minister to Viktor Chernomyrdin after deciding that the political costs were too high to keep Mr. Gaidar, the theoretical economist who launched Russia's radical, market-oriented reforms 11 months ago and who has become the focus of conservative fury over the country's economic state.
BUSINESS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | May 6, 1994
Former Russian Prime Minister Yegor Gaidar makes no apologies for the radical economic reforms he enacted in 1992 and 1993, even though the backlash against them forced him out of Russian President Boris Yeltsin's cabinet in January, and he says his country needs more of the same."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | December 10, 1992
MOSCOW -- Boris N. Yeltsin, who had consistently manage to stay a half-step ahead of his numerous foes in the Russian Congress of People's Deputies, finally fell short yesterday and saw his nominee for prime minister go down to defeat.Yegor T. Gaidar, who as acting prime minister has led Russia's far-reaching and risky economic reforms, was denied confirmation in a close vote, 467 in favor to 486 against. He needed 521 votes to be confirmed.The immediate result is continued political turmoil.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 2006
DUBLIN, IRELAND -- Irish authorities launched an inquiry yesterday into the sudden and violent illness of former Russian Prime Minister Yegor Gaidar, whose aides say might have been the victim of poisoning. Gaidar's illness while attending a conference in Ireland on Nov. 24 appeared to deepen the mystery surrounding the poisoning death a day earlier of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in London, although there was no immediate indication from investigators that the cases were linked.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 27, 1992
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's government declared its intent yesterday to forge ahead with painful pro-market reforms, defying pressure from a centrist bloc to compromise its programs in return for political support."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | January 17, 1994
MOSCOW -- Taking Russia and the world by surprise, economic reformer Yegor T. Gaidar resigned from the government yesterday, raising serious questions about President Boris N. Yeltsin's commitment to rapid reform.Mr. Gaidar's departure was particularly jolting, coming just a scant day after President Clinton left Moscow full of promises from Mr. Yeltsin to pursue economic reforms faster than ever."I cannot be in the government and in the opposition at the same time," Mr. Gaidar said in a letter to Mr. Yeltsin, adding that recent government policy was damaging economic progress and wasting millions of dollars.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- The Russian government did an about-fac yesterday and lifted controversial profit limits on products ranging from food to tires.The profit-limiting decree two weeks ago, the first major policy move by new Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, had been interpreted as a sign that he planned to try to administer the economy by fiat in the old Communist style rather than working with market forces.But Boris G. Fyodorov, the Russian vice premier in charge of economics, said Mr. Chernomyrdin had signed the decree because of a "bureaucratic slip-up" and announced that the government would set no new ceilings on prices and profits except in monopolized industries.
BUSINESS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | May 6, 1994
Former Russian Prime Minister Yegor Gaidar makes no apologies for the radical economic reforms he enacted in 1992 and 1993, even though the backlash against them forced him out of Russian President Boris Yeltsin's cabinet in January, and he says his country needs more of the same."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | January 23, 1994
MOSCOW -- Given the times here, it was only slightly startling to pick up a copy of Pravda the day after the appointment of a conservative-dominated government and find a large picture of Lenin splashed across the front page.As it turned out, Pravda was commemorating the 70th anniversary of Lenin's death last week rather than the revival of communism.But a glance at the worshipful photograph of a wise and kindly Lenin was reminder enough that anything can happen here -- and has.Only days ago, Yegor T. Gaidar, the architect of Russia's economic shock therapy, was describing the Russian legislature as an enemy of the government, one that must be controlled if not ignored.
NEWS
January 18, 1994
President Clinton's eight-day journey through Europe ended on a sour grace note with the resignation of Yesor T. Gaidar, chief advocate of "shock therapy" reforms for Russia's tottering economy, from Boris Yeltsin's cabinet. His departure came just one day after a Clinton-Yeltsin summit marked by fulsome words about the commitment of both leaders to Mr. Gaidar's kind of bold innovation.This, unfortunately, was typical of the mismatch between Mr. Clinton's sunny, upbeat, let's-make-a-deal diplomacy and the bleak, befuddling realities of present-day Europe.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | January 17, 1994
MOSCOW -- Taking Russia and the world by surprise, economic reformer Yegor T. Gaidar resigned from the government yesterday, raising serious questions about President Boris N. Yeltsin's commitment to rapid reform.Mr. Gaidar's departure was particularly jolting, coming just a scant day after President Clinton left Moscow full of promises from Mr. Yeltsin to pursue economic reforms faster than ever."I cannot be in the government and in the opposition at the same time," Mr. Gaidar said in a letter to Mr. Yeltsin, adding that recent government policy was damaging economic progress and wasting millions of dollars.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- The Russian government did an about-fac yesterday and lifted controversial profit limits on products ranging from food to tires.The profit-limiting decree two weeks ago, the first major policy move by new Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, had been interpreted as a sign that he planned to try to administer the economy by fiat in the old Communist style rather than working with market forces.But Boris G. Fyodorov, the Russian vice premier in charge of economics, said Mr. Chernomyrdin had signed the decree because of a "bureaucratic slip-up" and announced that the government would set no new ceilings on prices and profits except in monopolized industries.
NEWS
December 29, 1992
These are the days of hope and confusion in Russia.Many Russians are preparing to observe the New Year. Millions of others are returning to the observance of the spirit and traditions of Christmas, which was banned for more than seven decades by communists. Under the calendar used by the Russian Orthodox Church, the resurrected religious holiday falls on Jan. 7. Between these competing holidays, the whole country is a study of a society in cultural and political conflict.Only a year has elapsed since the ouster of Mikhail S. Gorbachev and the collapse of communism.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 1992
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin approved yesterday Cabinet put together by Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin that, with a few exceptions, is a replica of the much-maligned government led by Yegor T. Gaidar, a young, reform-minded economist.In holding together the core of the Gaidar team, the Russian leader has accomplished a goal he set with great flair last weekend when he cut short a trip to China to take charge of the appointments.Mr. Chernomyrdin, a 54-year-old Soviet-era technocrat, became prime minister a week ago, when a conservative majority at the Congress of People's Deputies forced Mr. Yeltsin to abandon Mr. Gaidar.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | December 3, 1992
MOSCOW -- Russia's Congress was in no mood to listen yesterday as Yegor T. Gaidar defended his economic reform policies in a confident, forceful hour-long speech, so in command of his facts he didn't even look at his notes.The Congress of People's Deputies, jeered him -- even as Mr. Gaidar pointed out that, despite predictions to the contrary, Russians are neither starving nor rioting in the streets.Mr. Gaidar is being undone by the same circumstances that created him: he's an economist, not a politician; he's offering grand economic theory instead of soothing predictions; he's talking about tightening the money supply when people want to hear that the price of bread will go down next month.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | December 9, 1992
MOSCOW -- Strategy takes many forms, and yesterday President Boris N. Yeltsin offered a compromise to the wary Russian Congress -- on an issue that he already had won.Mr. Yeltsin said he would subject several key Cabinet ministers to parliamentary confirmation -- with the implicit understanding that the Congress would in turn approve Yegor T. Gaidar as prime minister.The Russian leader had his reasons for reopening a contentious proposal that he had seemingly beaten back, just barely, Saturday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 21, 1992
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin, who rushed home from China to shore up his control over the formation of a new government, agreed with his new prime minister yesterday that the "core" of the last Cabinet of Westernized, free-market economists would remain in office, a spokesman for Mr. Yeltsin said.After several hours of talks yesterday involving Mr. Yeltsin, Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin and Vladimir Shumeiko, the first deputy prime minister, Mr. Yeltsin's spokesman announced, "The basic current team will be preserved."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | December 21, 1992
CHAPAYEVSK, Russia -- If you lived here in the Russian heartland, in a place like Chapayevsk, you would have to be a person of uncommon courage, strength and self-abnegation to have supported the government of Boris N. Yeltsin and Yegor T. Gaidar.After 70 years of communism and one year of shock therapy, the people of Chapayevsk are losing such fortitude. If the rest of the world wondered at the anger that erupted at this month's Russian Congress, leading to the assault on Mr. Gaidar and his reforms, they would easily find the answer here.
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