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By Laura Vozzella | July 11, 2011
The street artist known as Gaia, whose image of a leather-clad rooster cradling the head of John the Baptist had me questioning my eyesight and sanity last winter, has been unmasked -- in a way that proves no good deed goes unpunished. Gaia is trying to help the Edgar Allan Poe House, which is in danger of closing because the city has cut off funding. He has donated 100 limited-edition prints of "The Raven (Forevermore), 2011," which will be sold for $400 apiece unframed, $600 framed.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
When you paint on a wall in the middle of the city, people want to talk to you. They want to tell you how they would have painted things differently, choosing a different shade of green or a different subject entirely. They want to know why you're there. They want to tell you their stories. "You did that, man?" they ask. "That is all right. " For six days last month, the artist known as Gaia painted on the side of a Korean rice cake factory in the 2000 block of N. Charles St. in Station North.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
If you want to experience the work of street artist Gaia in its full, scruffy glory, see it in the wild. Drive south down North Collington Avenue, past Biddle and Eager and Chase. You will despair of spotting anything fresh in one blighted block after another. But slow down as you near Ashland. On the corner of a string of boarded-up rowhouses is an image you register with pleasure and relief: a portrait of a carrier pigeon as a natural creature with an almost unnatural poise. It's a jolting and precise piece of poster art. Mysterious and witty, it carries a kinetic charge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
When you paint on a wall in the middle of the city, people want to talk to you. They want to tell you how they would have painted things differently, choosing a different shade of green, or a different subject entirely. They want to know why you're there. They want to tell you their stories. "You did that, man?" they ask. "That is allllright. " For six days last week, the artist known as Gaia painted on the side of a Korean rice cake factory in the 2000 block of N. Charles St. in Station North.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
Brian Gaia won't be with his Gilman football teammates when they sign their national letters of intent Wednesday morning. He'll be getting ready to take on the world. The All-Metro lineman has been in Austin, Texas, this week preparing for Wednesday night's International Bowl, which pits the United States Under-19 team against a World Team of players from 20 countries, including American Samoa, Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Japan and Mexico. The players, however, will take a little time out of their busy schedule for a national signing day breakfast celebration, during which Gaia plans to sign with Penn State, a program he remained committed to through the uncertain ramifications of the Jerry Sandusky sexual-abuse scandal and the firing of legendary coach Joe Paterno.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
The walls of Station North - already home to towering geometric designs, assorted jungle cats and one giant dove - are set to get even more colorful in the coming weeks as Baltimore street artist Gaia reprises his popular mural project. Artists began work on the newest murals Sunday. The Open Walls Project 2 will run until June. In 2012, Gaia, an alumnus of the Maryland Institute College of Art , and collaborators from across the globe launched the Open Walls Project, installing roughly 15 building-sized murals through out Station North.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2012
Gaia - a young artist who's the brains behind a massive mural project around Baltimore's Station North neighborhood - likes to say the work isn't a traditional political statement. Yet listen to him talk, and he sounds a little bit like a community organizer with an awful lot of spray paint. "What were doing here is creating a social bridge, connecting different socioeconomic backgrounds," Gaia said of the more than 20 murals and sculpture pieces scattered through the arts district and the nearby Greenmount West neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
When you paint on a wall in the middle of the city, people want to talk to you. They want to tell you how they would have painted things differently, choosing a different shade of green, or a different subject entirely. They want to know why you're there. They want to tell you their stories. "You did that, man?" they ask. "That is allllright. " For six days last week, the artist known as Gaia painted on the side of a Korean rice cake factory in the 2000 block of N. Charles St. in Station North.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
When you paint on a wall in the middle of the city, people want to talk to you. They want to tell you how they would have painted things differently, choosing a different shade of green or a different subject entirely. They want to know why you're there. They want to tell you their stories. "You did that, man?" they ask. "That is all right. " For six days last month, the artist known as Gaia painted on the side of a Korean rice cake factory in the 2000 block of N. Charles St. in Station North.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
As Maryland lawmakers debated the gay marriage bill, and Del. Luke Clippinger came out to colleagues on the House floor, one of his fellow Baltimore Democrats was moved to tears. "My colleague Luke, I sit right next to him, enduring all these weeks of negativity, for him to finally speak out and say why he's in favor of it, what it means to him, it just got emotional," Del. Keiffer Mitchell told me. There's another reason the gay marriage debate hit home for Mitchell. His own marriage would have been illegal until 1967, the year he was born, because Mitchell is black and his wife is white.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
The walls of Station North - already home to towering geometric designs, assorted jungle cats and one giant dove - are set to get even more colorful in the coming weeks as Baltimore street artist Gaia reprises his popular mural project. Artists began work on the newest murals Sunday. The Open Walls Project 2 will run until June. In 2012, Gaia, an alumnus of the Maryland Institute College of Art , and collaborators from across the globe launched the Open Walls Project, installing roughly 15 building-sized murals through out Station North.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Musicians collaborate all the time; so do actors. But artists, not really - and that goes double for street art, where making an individual mark is the name of the game. That's why one of Baltimore's best-known street artists had to try it. The result is a head-turning show called ZimZum, opening Saturday at the Creative Alliance . It features an expansive indoor and outdoor group effort between Baltimore Love Project founder Michael Owen and the artists Gaia and Momo. "Most street artists just want to put their voice up on a wall," Owen says.
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2012
Gaia - a young artist who's the brains behind a massive mural project around Baltimore's Station North neighborhood - likes to say the work isn't a traditional political statement. Yet listen to him talk, and he sounds a little bit like a community organizer with an awful lot of spray paint. "What were doing here is creating a social bridge, connecting different socioeconomic backgrounds," Gaia said of the more than 20 murals and sculpture pieces scattered through the arts district and the nearby Greenmount West neighborhood.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
Brian Gaia won't be with his Gilman football teammates when they sign their national letters of intent Wednesday morning. He'll be getting ready to take on the world. The All-Metro lineman has been in Austin, Texas, this week preparing for Wednesday night's International Bowl, which pits the United States Under-19 team against a World Team of players from 20 countries, including American Samoa, Australia, Austria, Canada, France, Japan and Mexico. The players, however, will take a little time out of their busy schedule for a national signing day breakfast celebration, during which Gaia plans to sign with Penn State, a program he remained committed to through the uncertain ramifications of the Jerry Sandusky sexual-abuse scandal and the firing of legendary coach Joe Paterno.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | January 3, 2012
Catch one of the area's top linemen, Gilman's Brian Gaia, in action at the Semper Fi All-American Bowl Tuesday night in Phoenix, Arizona -- a game televised live on the CBS Sports Network at 6 p.m. Gaia, a two-time All-Metro lineman committed to Penn State, will be playing on the defensive line and is the only Baltimore-area player in the game. DeMatha's Michael Moore is the only other player from Maryland. Gilman coach Biff Poggi is the head coach for the East team. Two of his Gilman assistant coaches will also be there.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | November 22, 2011
Gilman lineman Brian Gaia has been selected to play for the United States Under-19 team in the third annual International Bowl Feb. 1 at The Palace at Round Rock in Austin, Texas. Gaia, a two-way lineman, helped the No. 1 Greyhounds to the MIAA A Conference championship in a 34-32 double-overtime victory over No. 2 Calvert Hall Saturday night. The 6-foot-3, 295-pound senior has committed to play defensive tackle at Penn State . The only player selected from the Baltimore area, Gaia joins Potomac running back Ronald Darby as the only two from Maryland.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 9, 1996
The three one-act plays produced by the Women's Project at the Theatre Project under the omnibus title "Beyond the Ingenue" cover a range of subjects. But they are tied together by the shared theme of relationships.None of these relationships, however, are of the conventional variety.In "The Most Beautiful Man in the World," written and directed by Linda Chambers, community theater serves as a surrogate family. This amusing piece takes place backstage at a performance of a play whose costumes -- from evening clothes to a Pierrot's clown suit -- suggest some kind of pretentious blend of Tennessee Williams and theater of the absurd.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | November 12, 2011
Brian Gaia committed to play football at Penn State in the spring, but this week that's not something the Gilman lineman wants to talk about. Gaia is set to play defensive tackle at Penn State next fall, but in light of the sex abuse scandal that has claimed the career of legendary head coach Joe Paterno, the All-Metro player is being contacted by other schools in case he breaks his commitment. Gaia declined to comment on his recruiting situation after he helped the No. 1 Greyhounds defeat No. 9 Archbishop Spalding on Friday afternoon, but Gilman coach Biff Poggi has advised him to take his time deciding whether to follow through with his commitment or pursue another offer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 11, 2011
The street artist known as Gaia, whose image of a leather-clad rooster cradling the head of John the Baptist had me questioning my eyesight and sanity last winter, has been unmasked -- in a way that proves no good deed goes unpunished. Gaia is trying to help the Edgar Allan Poe House, which is in danger of closing because the city has cut off funding. He has donated 100 limited-edition prints of "The Raven (Forevermore), 2011," which will be sold for $400 apiece unframed, $600 framed.
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