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Gag Order

NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Karen Hosler and Marina Sarris and Karen Hosler,Staff Writers | July 24, 1992
It could have been one of those moments that make press secretaries salivate.Imagine Gov. William Donald Schaefer conducting a news conference in the State House and being interrupted by a call from President Bush.Imagine the elated governor getting off the phone to announce that Maryland was receiving the second federal waiver ever granted to reform its welfare program. Imagine TV cameras recording it all, reporters scribbling every word.If only that plan had worked July 1, legislators and reporters might not be suffering under a gubernatorial gag order today.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | May 10, 2007
Concern about the environmental impact of a proposed 1,300-home development along Kent Island's waterfront - and local officials' inability to talk about it - prompted the Board of Public Works yesterday to get in the middle of a long-simmering dispute over building in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The three-member state board heard hours of testimony from the developer and from Queen Anne's County residents who worry about the effect of the project on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, eventually deciding to delay approval of a routine wetlands license to gather more information.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2000
Questions about whether Ray Lewis or his legal team violated the terms of a gag order have been raised with the judge presiding over the murder case, who intends to meet with attorneys next week to go over the order and other ground rules. Meanwhile, Lewis, the Ravens' All-Pro middle linebacker, reported yesterday morning for an interview with state officials charged with monitoring the terms of his bail release. Lewis was freed Tuesday on bail after being jailed in Atlanta, where he and two acquaintances have been indicted on murder and assault charges in connection with a double slaying Jan. 31. Also yesterday, a lawyer representing a Baltimore woman who alleges that Lewis assaulted her in a Baltimore County bar said she was hastily flown by prosecutors to Atlanta to testify against his release on bail.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff writer | October 30, 1991
A judge has issued a gag order in a case stemming from the slaying of an Annapolis man described as a former police informant.CircuitJudge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. cleared the courtroom Monday for a hearing on whether accused murderer Howard Eugene "Howdy" Stevens Jr.'s confession to Annapolis police should be thrown out. Thieme's order to conduct the hearing behind closed doors came in response to a joint motion from prosecutor Frank Ragione and defense attorney...
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2005
A man charged with killing five mostly elderly people since 1999 was ordered held without bail yesterday while, hours later, a Baltimore Circuit Court judge issued a ruling prohibiting prosecutors from making public comments in the high-profile case. Richard Woods, the public defender for Raymont Hopewell, said a gag order was necessary to preserve his client's right to an impartial city jury. The case has generated intense media attention because of the age of the victims and the nature of the crimes.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1996
Three Army trainers facing court-martial charges of sexual misconduct at Aberdeen Proving Ground cannot get fair trials, because of publicity surrounding the cases, defense attorneys argued yesterday while calling for a gag order on senior officials.Attorneys for Capt. Derrick Robertson, Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson and Sgt. Nathanael C. Beach told a judge at arraignment proceedings that publicity has damaged their clients' right to a fair trial.And they criticized a request by Army prosecutors that Lt. Col. Linda Webster, who presided over the arraignments, ban potential jurors from reading, watching or listening to news reports about the cases.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
Baltimore officials hit back Thursday at claims that they pushed for secrecy in a six-figure settlement involving a man mistakenly arrested by city police, providing a document that they say shows the man's lawyer pushed for confidentiality. But the lawyer responded by releasing other documents that he says prove the city initiated the discussion over privacy, and that his counterproposals were made to protect his client. In the end, each side stood firm in its contention that the other was not being truthful, but both agreed that the episode had become "regrettable.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 23, 1990
THE SUPREME COURT, ignoring its own precedents, has let stand a federal judge's gag order forbidding Cable News Network from broadcasting tapes of Manuel Noriega's jailhouse telephone conversations. The court offered no explanation for its stunning and potentially far-reaching decision. Its 7-2 vote, refusing both CNN's emergency request to lift the stay and its appeal on the merits of the gag order, means that for now at least the effort to deny CNN its right of free speech remains in force.
SPORTS
October 5, 1991
The lawyer representing Mike Tyson's accuser wants a gag order lifted so she may respond to remarks made by the former heavyweight boxing champion and his supporters.Tyson was indicted last month by a grand jury on charges of rape, criminal deviate conduct and confinement in the alleged attack of a Miss Black America contestant in Indianapolis in July.In a news conference after the indictment, Tyson and promoter Don King made several charges about the alleged victim, mentioning her by name numerous times.
NEWS
September 7, 1994
County police could reveal as early as next week the results of their investigation of an employee who admitted to helping his girlfriend purchase illegal drugs while he worked in the department's evidence property room. Officials should attempt to clear up what so far has looked like a cover-up. Public trust is badly eroded when law enforcement officers attempt to hide their actions behind a cloak of secrecy.In this case, the police department has refused to release details of the matter because this would violate confidential personnel records.
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