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NEWS
June 27, 2012
I think there can be legitimate discussion between many Republicans and many Democrats. Unfortunately the Republicans have a really bad candidate. Mitt Romney, aside from offering some vague platitudes about a certain philosophy, has now demonstrated at least three times that he doesn't know enough. In Aaron Sorkin's words, "Let's speak truth to stupid. " He said, "Russia is our most dangerous adversary," which is just a bit out of date. What happened to the worldwide war on terror?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 15, 2014
"Political cover" is a powerful phenomenon in contemporary politics. But it can make voters plenty cynical about the ways and means of political warfare. It's typically utilized wherever a well-known progressive Democrat speaks or acts outside of permissible lines, i.e., crosses the politically correct police with an insensitive (or worse) comment on the public stage. On such occasions, the mainstream press will duly note the offensive comment. Appropriate, albeit limited, criticism will follow.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 28, 2011
If it's a new day, there's probably at least one new Michele Bachmann gaffe. Today's comes courtesy of an interview Bachmann did with ABC News, in which she categorized John Quincy Adams (who was the sixth president) as a "founding father" when it was his dad, John Adams (the second president), who was actually one of the founding fathers.  Bachmann's been getting beat up in the media today over the statement, but watching the clip, I don't think this is one of her worst mistakes.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
The inexperience that coach Tom Gravante anticipated seeing from a Mount St. Mary's team that graduated 22 seniors last May came to fruition in Saturday's scrimmage against Richmond. The Mountaineers committed 23 turnovers in four 15-minute quarters and fared poorly overall against the Spiders, who are making their college lacrosse debut this season. But Gravante said the mistakes were not shocking. “My staff anticipated not performing to our ability for a couple reasons,” he said Tuesday evening.
NEWS
October 28, 2013
I am no fan of either Attorney General Doug Gansler or columnist Dan Rodricks , but I would venture that those now crying foul over Mr. Gansler's presence at a beach house party in Delaware where underage high school graduates were drinking probably drank alcohol themselves at their own senior week parties ("Gansler's public duty, parental strategy collide," Oct. 24). It may be illegal, but teens consider drinking a rite of passage. Those with the loudest protests better hope nobody kept any photos of their senior parties.
NEWS
March 25, 2012
What a headline: "Aide's gaffe dogs Romney" (March 22). Do the headline writers read the articles first or do they just skim them until they find a "gotcha" phrase? I watched two different Baltimore TV channels' coverage of Mr. Romney's visit and nothing was mentioned about the so-called "gaffe. " Yet The Sun had to create something negative and eye-catching, and it chose to run with this on page 1. Marie Mullen, Joppa
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
Democratic front-runner Barack Obama was repeatedly thrown on the defensive last night in a television debate that spotlighted campaign gaffes, his association with a controversial former pastor and a '60s radical, and his reluctance to wear a flag pin in his lapel. Obama described those as "manufactured" issues and tried to fend off criticism of his recent gaffe about "bitter" small-town Americans by turning it into an attack on Hillary Clinton. The overall tone of the debate was civil and far less heated than recent charges by both candidates at campaign events.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Tomorrow night's presidential debate, the first of the three to be held in the space of eight days, has taken on immense political importance for President Bush. He needs something to happen during the scheduled 90 minutes to detour the widespread impression settling in that his candidacy is dead in the water.As the incumbent, he normally would be taking a considerable risk merely by giving equal billing to his challengers, Democratic nominee Bill Clinton and independent candidate Ross Perot.
NEWS
By MARTIN D. TULLAI | October 6, 1996
DURING A RECENT campaign stop in Pennsylvania, Bob Dole took aim at Bill Clinton's crime program. "He talks like Dirty Harry, but he acts like Barney Fife," the Republican challenger quipped.A good sharp zinger, but not quite original. Almost before the laughter subsided, the Democrats were yelling "plagiarism" as they brought out a tape of Gov. Zell Miller of Georgia using the exact punch line - on George Bush in 1992.Columnist William Safire has noted that a blooper is "an exploitative mistake" that is worse than a goof and a boo-boo, equivalent to a gaffe, but not as serious as a blunder.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 29, 2004
WASHINGTON -- These days the terms Republican and moderation seldom go together. The Grand Old Party has gone so far down the road of conservatism that you can probably name the prominent moderate Republicans on the fingers of one hand, or two anyway. Liberal Republicans are an endangered species in what could be called the Reagan-Bush era, referring to President George W. Bush, not his Dad, who was never really embraced by the party's conservative wing. For these reasons, the death at 61 last week of Republican political consultant John Deardourff recalls another era in which a true struggle for direction of the GOP was fought between a liberal-to-moderate wing and the steadfast apostles of the right.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 8, 2013
Every American president has to weather occasional political gaffes. Whether their own or those committed by associates, they cause temporary embarrassment or pain but are ultimately survivable. Loose lips may sink ships, as was often said in warning during World War II, but they're seldom fatal in the normal course of governing. Major mistakes, however, if they linger or are repeated, can be the undoing of a presidency. The excesses of the Vietnam War that drove Lyndon Johnson to the sidelines in 1968, and Watergate, which led to Richard Nixon's resignation in 1974, have had lasting political consequences.
NEWS
October 28, 2013
I am no fan of either Attorney General Doug Gansler or columnist Dan Rodricks , but I would venture that those now crying foul over Mr. Gansler's presence at a beach house party in Delaware where underage high school graduates were drinking probably drank alcohol themselves at their own senior week parties ("Gansler's public duty, parental strategy collide," Oct. 24). It may be illegal, but teens consider drinking a rite of passage. Those with the loudest protests better hope nobody kept any photos of their senior parties.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | October 28, 2013
"I gave 'em a sword and they stuck it in and they twisted it with relish, and I guess if I had been in their position, I would have done the same thing. " This great quote from the interviews that Richard Nixon gave to David Frost in 1977 summarizes Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's significant, possibly gubernatorial candidacy-destroying, dilemma. When you are seriously flawed, as virtually every power-seeker is, and you give ammunition to your enemies, which not all power-seekers do in abundance, they (the enemies)
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Terrance West fumbled twice in the first quarter of Towson's home game against New Hampshire, but the junior running back bounced back nicely to finish with 238 yards and three touchdowns on 28 carries in the No. 3 Tigers' eventual 44-28 victory over the then-No. 19 Wildcats last Saturday. For his effort, the Baltimore native and Northwestern graduate shared with Fordham junior quarterback Michael Nebrich the National Football Championship Subdivision Offensive Player of the Week by The Sports Network.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | August 19, 2013
An ugly fight unfolded last week between gubernatorial aspirants Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler regarding their campaign rhetoric. Mr. Gansler was surreptitiously recorded saying, "I mean, right now [Mr. Brown's] campaign slogan is, 'Vote for me, I want to be the first African American governor of Maryland.' ... That's a laudable goal, but you need a second sentence: 'Because here's what I've done, and here's why I've done it.'" The Brown camp and other Democratic bigwigs are appalled: According to The Washington Post, which broke the story, Brown campaign manager Justin Schall stated that Mr. Gansler is "out of touch with Maryland's values," and to ensure that there was no lack of overreaction, Brown supporter Montgomery County Council member Valerie Ervin actually said, "White people don't like the race card being pulled on them, and he pulled the race card on Anthony.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
Your editorial headline, "Gansler's gaffe" (Aug. 14) may grab the reader's attention, but it is totally misleading. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said nothing wrong or unseemly in his remarks first reported by another newspaper. The full context of those remarks, which to your credit you point out in the middle of the editorial, supports the fact that he said nothing for which he needs to apologize. I don't know Mr. Gansler, and at this early point in the campaign for governor, I am not his supporter, but I would bet he is not racist.
NEWS
January 7, 1999
Some GOP leaders are the descendants of racists of the pastYour editorial "GOP's gaffe" (Dec. 29) was on target.Anyone who believes that such Southern, backwoods politicians as Mississippi Senators Trent Lott and Thad Cochrane and others of their ilk are not kissing cousins of racist individuals and organizations of the old South has been living on another planet for the last half century.Those of us who pay attention to man's inhumanity to man, political and otherwise, view their denials as typical behavior of small men of even smaller minds who still dwell in the psychological swampland of racism.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
We have the first gaffe of the 2014 governor's race, and it's a doozy. The Washington Post reported Tuesday on a speech Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler gave to a roomful of volunteers for his nascent gubernatorial campaign in which he suggested that his chief rival for the Democratic nomination, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, was counting on his race, not his accomplishments, to win. Mr. Gansler goes on, according to an audio recording obtained by...
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2013
If there is a lasting image from the Orioles' 5-4 loss to the Boston Red Sox on Saturday, it's pinch-runner Alexi Casilla standing at third base, arms spread wide, palms in the air, mouthing “What happened?” to coach Bobby Dickerson. The answer wasn't what Casilla, the potential tying run, wanted to hear: Boston right fielder Shane Victorino had dashed to his left, caught Ryan Flaherty's liner with little trouble and threw to first to double up Casilla and end the game. In the recent past, “What happened?
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