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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | November 9, 2006
With a larger new location and more cultural events, Irish Festival organizers are hoping to lure nearly twice as many people as last year. The volunteer-run festival starts tomorrow and runs through Sunday at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. In the past, the festival was held at the 5th Regiment Armory. Last year, it drew about 10,000 people, said spokesman Harry Bosk. "I think this venue is going to make it easier for people to park," Bosk said. "It's going to be a bigger and brighter venue.
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SPORTS
By Brian Paxton and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
The Baltimore Bohemian isn't your usual sports club. The team splits a case of beer at practice, it wins national championships and it plays sports you've probably never heard of. The Baltimore Gaelic Athletic Association, or BGAA, is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year. The Bohemian, as the organization is commonly called, is separated into four teams that play traditional Irish sports such as men's and women's Gaelic football, camogie and hurling. But while that sounds like a league for displaced Irishmen - and it is to an extent - the Baltimore team is predominantly made up of people trying the games for the first time.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
When Tadgh Prendeville moved from his native Ireland to Baltimore for work more than a decade ago, he couldn't play Gaelic football without going to Washington. The same was true for Lucy Clerkin in her pursuit to play camogie, or hurling for women, which the Maryland native learned while visiting her grandmother in Ireland. Eventually, Prendeville and Clerkin found themselves commuting together to Washington for weeknight practices and weekend games as members of the Washington Gaels.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
When Tadgh Prendeville moved from his native Ireland to Baltimore for work more than a decade ago, he couldn't play Gaelic football without going to Washington. The same was true for Lucy Clerkin in her pursuit to play camogie, or hurling for women, which the Maryland native learned while visiting her grandmother in Ireland. Eventually, Prendeville and Clerkin found themselves commuting together to Washington for weeknight practices and weekend games as members of the Washington Gaels.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | April 18, 2004
If you can't wait until the fall for football, head down to Patterson Park on Sundays starting today for a different kind of football -- Gaelic football. The newly formed Baltimore Gaelic Athletic Association is hoping to renew area interest in Gaelic football, hurling and camogie. The games are fun to watch and more fun to play, league organizers say. And players get a great workout, too. And because the league is new, most of the players are only beginning to hone their skills, so everyone plays at about the same level.
SPORTS
By Brian Paxton and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
The Baltimore Bohemian isn't your usual sports club. The team splits a case of beer at practice, it wins national championships and it plays sports you've probably never heard of. The Baltimore Gaelic Athletic Association, or BGAA, is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year. The Bohemian, as the organization is commonly called, is separated into four teams that play traditional Irish sports such as men's and women's Gaelic football, camogie and hurling. But while that sounds like a league for displaced Irishmen - and it is to an extent - the Baltimore team is predominantly made up of people trying the games for the first time.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 3, 1996
DUBLIN, Ireland -- The way Dave Sheaham sees it, American football isn't about to catch on in Ireland.There are too many huddles. The players are too polite. And get this, it's not a violent enough sport for Sheaham, a Dublin mailman."A guy goes down on the field, and you walk away," Sheaham said as he watched Notre Dame pound Navy, 54-27, yesterday. "In Ireland, we'd kick 'em when he's on the ground."By almost every measure, the Shamrock Classic was a roaring success at Croke Park. Except for one thing.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Padraig Harrington has a college degree in accounting, which is handy when you become the seventh-ranked professional golfer in the world and the top player in Europe. More than anything, Harrington has a perspective that is different from many of his peers. It's reality-based. It comes from growing up the namesake of a Gaelic football star who became a policeman outside Dublin, and not having any grand illusions when forsaking a career in which the numbers need to add up for one in which the numbers are not always an accurate reflection of success.
FEATURES
By Morit Chatlynne | February 18, 1996
St. Patrick's DaySt. Patrick's Day is almost here, and, along with it, some Americans will be celebrating their Irish heritage. The Florida Irish Festival will be held Friday, March 15, through Sunday, March 17, in Casselberry, Fla. The festival will be highlighted by more than 100 Irish and Irish-American musicians, ranging in style from bluegrass to rock to folk to traditional Irish music on handcrafted instruments. Among the performers will be the 97th Regiment String Band, a Civil-War-garbed folk trio.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2007
Area residents had many things to say about yesterday's heat, some of which cannot be printed in a newspaper. But Daire Geraghty managed to offer a polite description, even as he stretched out on a patch of withered grass in a city park. "This is unbearable," said Geraghty, 22. His teammates on the Washington Gaels, who had come to Southeast Baltimore's Bocek Park to play a local Gaelic football team, mopped their foreheads with T-shirts and muttered oaths about the heat. Temperatures in the city hit a high of 98 degrees at 4 p.m. at the Maryland Science Center, but the heat index - the combined effect of heat and humidity - reached 102 degrees at one point in the afternoon, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | November 9, 2006
With a larger new location and more cultural events, Irish Festival organizers are hoping to lure nearly twice as many people as last year. The volunteer-run festival starts tomorrow and runs through Sunday at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. In the past, the festival was held at the 5th Regiment Armory. Last year, it drew about 10,000 people, said spokesman Harry Bosk. "I think this venue is going to make it easier for people to park," Bosk said. "It's going to be a bigger and brighter venue.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | April 18, 2004
If you can't wait until the fall for football, head down to Patterson Park on Sundays starting today for a different kind of football -- Gaelic football. The newly formed Baltimore Gaelic Athletic Association is hoping to renew area interest in Gaelic football, hurling and camogie. The games are fun to watch and more fun to play, league organizers say. And players get a great workout, too. And because the league is new, most of the players are only beginning to hone their skills, so everyone plays at about the same level.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Padraig Harrington has a college degree in accounting, which is handy when you become the seventh-ranked professional golfer in the world and the top player in Europe. More than anything, Harrington has a perspective that is different from many of his peers. It's reality-based. It comes from growing up the namesake of a Gaelic football star who became a policeman outside Dublin, and not having any grand illusions when forsaking a career in which the numbers need to add up for one in which the numbers are not always an accurate reflection of success.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 3, 1996
DUBLIN, Ireland -- The way Dave Sheaham sees it, American football isn't about to catch on in Ireland.There are too many huddles. The players are too polite. And get this, it's not a violent enough sport for Sheaham, a Dublin mailman."A guy goes down on the field, and you walk away," Sheaham said as he watched Notre Dame pound Navy, 54-27, yesterday. "In Ireland, we'd kick 'em when he's on the ground."By almost every measure, the Shamrock Classic was a roaring success at Croke Park. Except for one thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ALLIE SEMENZA | May 10, 2007
CYLBURN'S MARKET DAY The lowdown -- Saturday, shop for flowers and plants at Cylburn Arboretum's annual Market Day. There will also be a flea market, used book sale, kids' activities and live music. If you go -- Market Day will be held 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Cylburn Arboretum is at 4915 Greenspring Ave. Parking costs $4. Call 410-367-2217 or go to cyl burnassociation.org. Celtic fest The lowdown -- Don your kilt and head for the Fredrick Celtic Festival Saturday. There will be bagpipe music, Scottish and Irish dancing, Celtic foods and crafts, kids' activities and Gaelic football.
NEWS
November 29, 1993
The great thing about the World Cup of Soccer to be played in this country next summer is that perennial power England did not qualify. Its legion of hooligan fans, who travel only to start riots, will not come. The U.S. is self-sufficient in riots, thank you, with no need to import any.Nor will soccer-mad Scotland, Northern Ireland or Wales come. They also failed to qualify. The United Kingdom has more national soccer teams (four) than the old Soviet Union had votes in the U.N. (three).But Ireland, a country with hardly any soccer tradition, will come with a strong team.
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