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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
You know that shiny smart phone you bought six months ago? There's an even better one hitting the market right about now. Or how about that flat-panel TV you bought last year. Now they come in 3-D. With the ever-quickening pace of technological advances, you can be left in the digital dust. Retailers now have a solution for consumers — and for themselves. They will buy back your old gadget in hopes that you turn around and buy the next best gadget on their shelves. Under these "buyback" programs, big-box retailers and online merchants give cash or credit for a piece of used electronics.
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BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Your smart phone is often thought of as unhealthy. It can make you anti-social, be a danger while driving and probably makes you fat (doesn't everything?). But hundreds of health experts are gathering in Prince George's County this week to discuss how a mobile device can make you healthier. The mHealth Summitt is talking about a lot of intriguing stuff including house calls via video chat, using games as teaching tools and apps that monitor blood pressure to prevent strokes. Yet a lot of the focus of this year's conference is on using mobile devices as health tools in developing countries.
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TRAVEL
By JUDI DASH | November 6, 2005
What with downloading movies, vacation photos and other memory-hogging files, you're likely to need some extra digital storage space. Thanks to Seagate, you can get a whopping 100 gigabytes of it in the Portable External Hard Drive, which is about the size of a deck of cards and weighs less than a pound. In most cases, putting this handy unit into operation is as easy as plugging it into your computer's USB port. The drive lists for $270, but is available for less online. 877-271-3285; seagate.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | October 22, 2012
Has Apple gotten lousy at keeping secrets these days? The tech press is abuzz with speculation that the company which birthed the iPhone and the iPad will be coming out with an in-between device, an iPad mini. The mini is expected to be smaller than the iPad but larger than the iPhone, and presumably go head-to-head against other similar devices from Amazon (Kindle Fire), Google (Nexus 7) and other manufacturers. What's interesting is that Microsoft is expected to unveil Windows 8 later this week, plus its own tablet competitor, Surface, on Friday.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Your smart phone is often thought of as unhealthy. It can make you anti-social, be a danger while driving and probably makes you fat (doesn't everything?). But hundreds of health experts are gathering in Prince George's County this week to discuss how a mobile device can make you healthier. The mHealth Summitt is talking about a lot of intriguing stuff including house calls via video chat, using games as teaching tools and apps that monitor blood pressure to prevent strokes. Yet a lot of the focus of this year's conference is on using mobile devices as health tools in developing countries.
FEATURES
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2001
Cavemen invented the first knife because they needed to eat. It makes sense: survival instinct. But how do we explain the modern-day invention of a gelato paddle? Need? No. As this planet's most intelligent life form, surely we can figure out how to get gelato out of a carton. Can't you use a spoon? Heck, just lick it straight from the tub. The explanation is predictably simple in this consumer-driven country: perceived need. We think we need it. Add a shortage of time along with visions of easy gourmet grandeur, and it becomes downright imperative.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sean Gallagher and Sean Gallagher,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 1998
No matter how we try to get rid of it, paper rules our lives.Even with computers to keep our schedules, send electronic mail, track our bills and organize our lives, eventually we end up scribbling with pen and ink.But the rule of the notebook, the Daytimer and the Filofax is under challenge from a generation of hand-held electronic gadgets designed to help us manage our lives and our work.Officer John Lee of the Annapolis Police Department is a believer.The 5-year veteran used to rely on steno pads to record the information he collected on patrol in the city's public housing projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Kaplan and Karen Kaplan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2001
For Jeanne Miller, the Internet revolution was crystallized in a wondrous device called SportBrain - a $99 clip-on unit that measured her physical activity throughout the day and relayed the information to a personalized Web site. "Everywhere I turned, people were touting SportBrain," said Miller, a Seattle marketing executive. "Oprah had it, of all people!" She saw the gadget as high technology's ultimate gift to fitness and was immediately addicted - for all of four months. In July, the company went out of business, rendering Miller's and 40,000 other SportBrains useless.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasmi Simhan and Rasmi Simhan,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2000
Whitney Hess wants to make life as simple as possible. She keeps to-do lists, phone numbers and addresses in her Handspring Visor and uses the handheld PC to check local movie listings. She has a CD writer to "burn" her own albums, a digital camcorder for video editing, and a DVD player built into her laptop for movies on the go. Should she need to send snail-mail, she can write a letter on her computer and print an address sticker for the envelope with her label writer. But she's more likely to communicate by e-mail with a wireless gizmo the size of a pager.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | January 4, 1998
IF I WERE really good at predicting the future, I wouldn't be writing this column now. I'd be too busy buying the right stocks, betting the right horses and entering every NCAA Final Four pool I could find.However, my lack of success in these endeavors has never stopped me from trying to report tomorrow's technology news today. So as 1998 begins, here are my annual New Year's predictions about what will be hot and what will be not.Hot hardware: Look for a whole slew of gadgets aimed at the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | February 23, 2012
Throughout the 1980s and '90s, there was a gold standard brand-name in consumer electronics: Sony. If you had disposable income and were interested in entertaining yourself, you were looking at Sony products first, and then working your way down. In the early part of this century, that mantle was captured by Steve Jobs' reincarnated Apple. Through its dominance in high-end mobile devices and consolidation of major functions, Apple pulled the dedicated portable gaming system out of the mainstream consumer's hand and replaced it with a sleek, pricey, all-in-one device.
NEWS
By Abe Novick | December 27, 2011
It's a good thing Gertrude Stein never said, "A phone is a phone is a phone. " Clearly, these days, her tautology would be a disconnect, received like a dropped call. The mobile devices we're so dependent on, attached like an extension of our brains, are so much more. Ultimately, they allow everything to be knowable. But while the smooth, mirrored glass on an iPhone presents a funhouse from which anyone can observe all the YouTube videos, Facebook updates, Tweets and apps, ad infinitum and at an instant - when blended with the speed of driving, it's enough to send a person careening through the glass of a car windshield onto the hard, real world pavement.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2011
Joseph Emmett Queen Jr., who spent three decades as a systems engineer for Westinghouse and its successor company, Northrop Grumman, died of unknown causes Sept. 12 at his home in Riva. He was 57. A Baltimore native, Mr. Queen grew up in and around the Guilford and Roland Park neighborhoods. He attended the Cathedral School, Loyola High School and Loyola College (now Loyola University Maryland). He received his master's degree in computer science from the Johns Hopkins University in 1983.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
Something new is floating in the Inner Harbor. Not litter this time, but a space age-looking gadget meant to see whether new life can be breathed into the troubled body of water. Local environmentalists and an engineering firm teamed up Thursday to place a Solar Bee, a sun-powered water-mixing device that resembles an old-fashioned satellite, off the end of the Recreation Pier in Fells Point. It will be anchored there for the next 21/2 months to test whether it can make even a small dent in the oxygen-starved "dead zone" in the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River every summer, stressing and killing fish.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | March 26, 2011
The Baltimore Sun She held a magnifying glass in each hand, lining one up behind the other and squinting hard to see through. Kelly Schaefer, 10, of Sterling, Va., couldn't quite make out what was in the tiny picture mounted on the wall several feet away. "Try moving the lenses closer together or farther apart," said Brian Turkett, a member of the education department at the Maryland Science Center . "It's a galaxy!" she cried as an image came into focus. It was 3:30 Saturday afternoon, halfway through the museum's unique celebration of Earth Hour 2011, the occasion on which millions around the globe were to make a statement about energy use by turning off all non-essential lights between 8:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. The museum would be closed by then, as usual, so staffers decided to fashion their own version of the event: Between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m., they shut down computers and most other electronic gadgets at two of their most popular installations, TerraLink and SpaceLink, treating kids to interactive experiences that used almost no electricity, taught respect for the environment and invited questions about forms of energy they might not have thought about before.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine | March 15, 2011
Linkspiration 3/15 Quick links to interesting stuff around the Internet. 1. "Reinvent Your Stuff: 21 Fun DIY Projects"  New uses for things you already own via Sunset.com. 2.  "Grant Achatz: The Chef Who Lost His Sense Of Taste" Can you imagine? Inspiring story. Head chef of Alinea in Chicago talks about his battle with tongue cancer on NPR's Fresh Air. 3. Recoveringlazyholic.com For everyone who experiences bouts of laziness. Myself included.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN CARPENTER and SUSAN CARPENTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2005
Tired of that boring white iPod? How about that bottom-of-the-line phone you got with your wireless plan? Maybe you should put some bling on that thing. You know, ice it with a little python skin or dress it up with a Christtian Dior antenna trinket. "Pimped," "iced," "blinged out." Whatever you want to call them, decked-out gadgets -- as well as couture and luxury models -- are reaching ever-escalating heights of outrageousness. From Gucci iPod cases to emerald-laden Treos, they've gone far beyond the Swarovski crystal-encrusted cells made famous by status-obsessed starlets such as Paris Hilton.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
You know that shiny smart phone you bought six months ago? There's an even better one hitting the market right about now. Or how about that flat-panel TV you bought last year. Now they come in 3-D. With the ever-quickening pace of technological advances, you can be left in the digital dust. Retailers now have a solution for consumers — and for themselves. They will buy back your old gadget in hopes that you turn around and buy the next best gadget on their shelves. Under these "buyback" programs, big-box retailers and online merchants give cash or credit for a piece of used electronics.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
This fall, the hit course on some college campuses may very well be iPad 101. At the University of Maryland, administrators plan to hand out Apple iPads to about 60 students, part of a new two-year program called Digital Culture and Creativity that immerses students in new technologies and focuses on the potential of the iPad to shake up the campus experience. The iPad has experienced early success in the consumer market, with more than 3 million sold since April, and it's already going back to school.
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