Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFyodorov
IN THE NEWS

Fyodorov

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 1998
MOSCOW -- An outspoken economic reformer reportedly has left the Russian government, removing one of the last strong voices for free-market reform in the team being put together by Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov.The future of the official, Boris Fyodorov, a former finance minister who returned to the government in the spring to spearhead an aggressive tax collection drive, has been closely watched here and abroad as a sign of whether the Primakov government will represent a range of economic viewpoints or will tilt heavily toward policies favored by the Communists.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 8, 2000
MOSCOW -- During the Cold War era, Soviet women looked like so many ballistic missiles, their bodies molded into hard, imposing lines by the unlovely and unforgiving underwear of the day. All that changed after Russia began to project a come-hither image to the rest of the world. Now, women's underwear is soft, beautiful and sexy, especially the bra. The bra has shed its rocket-ship-nose-cone past and has turned up on advertising posters all over Moscow -- lacy, racy, round, usually French or Italian.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
Until the bank called that day in 1995, Kurt Jakobson figured Igor Fyodorov was just talking big.A former Environmental Protection Agency engineer who ran a tax-preparation business from his Pikesville home, Jakobson had helped the Russian immigrant with the intricacies of American taxes and corporate charters. He dismissed as so much hot air Fyodorov's assurances that lucrative deals were just around the corner.Then Jakobson's Ellicott City bank phoned."They said, '$2 million just arrived in your account,' " Jakobson recalls.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 1998
MOSCOW -- An outspoken economic reformer reportedly has left the Russian government, removing one of the last strong voices for free-market reform in the team being put together by Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov.The future of the official, Boris Fyodorov, a former finance minister who returned to the government in the spring to spearhead an aggressive tax collection drive, has been closely watched here and abroad as a sign of whether the Primakov government will represent a range of economic viewpoints or will tilt heavily toward policies favored by the Communists.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Clara Germani contributed to this article | March 29, 1997
Former Soviet submarine Lt. Igor Fyodorov came to Maryland six years ago and learned the basics of capitalism. Once he made a bundle exporting children's swimming pools back to Russia, a country in need of nearly everything America has to offer.Then he learned something more intricate: how to vanish after purportedly absconding with $7.2 million from a Moscow bank in a shadowy business deal.Now a prominent Baltimore law firm is searching for the money in a Swiss bank and Fyodorov is being hunted by mysterious Russian men who have been calling his former associates in the middle of the night, asking questions no one seems able to answer.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- The Russian government did an about-fac yesterday and lifted controversial profit limits on products ranging from food to tires.The profit-limiting decree two weeks ago, the first major policy move by new Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, had been interpreted as a sign that he planned to try to administer the economy by fiat in the old Communist style rather than working with market forces.But Boris G. Fyodorov, the Russian vice premier in charge of economics, said Mr. Chernomyrdin had signed the decree because of a "bureaucratic slip-up" and announced that the government would set no new ceilings on prices and profits except in monopolized industries.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 27, 1998
MOSCOW -- Cheating on taxes has gotten so out of hand here that it poses a bigger threat to Russia's fragile economy than the tumbling stock market or ballooning interest rates, Boris Fyodorov, the new tax chief, said yesterday.With revenue from oil sales falling, Russia's only hope of avoiding a ruinous devaluation of the ruble this summer is to start pulling in what its citizens owe in taxes.But Fyodorov has to accomplish that with a woefully underpaid and unqualified tax service that, he said, is ridden with bribery and corruption.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 11, 1993
MOSCOW -- Under pressure from Western governments an the International Monetary Fund, which are stepping up their aid, the Russian central bank has agreed with the Russian government for the first time on the amount of new credits it will issue.Although technical and possibly temporary, covering only the second quarter of this year, the agreement is important. The unrestrained issuing of credits by the central bank has driven Russian inflation to dangerous levels, devalued the ruble and undermined the economic reforms of President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 8, 2000
MOSCOW -- During the Cold War era, Soviet women looked like so many ballistic missiles, their bodies molded into hard, imposing lines by the unlovely and unforgiving underwear of the day. All that changed after Russia began to project a come-hither image to the rest of the world. Now, women's underwear is soft, beautiful and sexy, especially the bra. The bra has shed its rocket-ship-nose-cone past and has turned up on advertising posters all over Moscow -- lacy, racy, round, usually French or Italian.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1994
In a small office at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Russian chemist Valentin L. Rubailo speaks of perhaps the biggest hurdle in the effort to dispose of the world's largest stockpiles of chemical weapons."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 27, 1998
MOSCOW -- Cheating on taxes has gotten so out of hand here that it poses a bigger threat to Russia's fragile economy than the tumbling stock market or ballooning interest rates, Boris Fyodorov, the new tax chief, said yesterday.With revenue from oil sales falling, Russia's only hope of avoiding a ruinous devaluation of the ruble this summer is to start pulling in what its citizens owe in taxes.But Fyodorov has to accomplish that with a woefully underpaid and unqualified tax service that, he said, is ridden with bribery and corruption.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1997
Until the bank called that day in 1995, Kurt Jakobson figured Igor Fyodorov was just talking big.A former Environmental Protection Agency engineer who ran a tax-preparation business from his Pikesville home, Jakobson had helped the Russian immigrant with the intricacies of American taxes and corporate charters. He dismissed as so much hot air Fyodorov's assurances that lucrative deals were just around the corner.Then Jakobson's Ellicott City bank phoned."They said, '$2 million just arrived in your account,' " Jakobson recalls.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Clara Germani contributed to this article | March 29, 1997
Former Soviet submarine Lt. Igor Fyodorov came to Maryland six years ago and learned the basics of capitalism. Once he made a bundle exporting children's swimming pools back to Russia, a country in need of nearly everything America has to offer.Then he learned something more intricate: how to vanish after purportedly absconding with $7.2 million from a Moscow bank in a shadowy business deal.Now a prominent Baltimore law firm is searching for the money in a Swiss bank and Fyodorov is being hunted by mysterious Russian men who have been calling his former associates in the middle of the night, asking questions no one seems able to answer.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1994
In a small office at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Russian chemist Valentin L. Rubailo speaks of perhaps the biggest hurdle in the effort to dispose of the world's largest stockpiles of chemical weapons."
NEWS
By William Safire | February 3, 1994
YOU CAN'T throw a snowball at the World Economic Forum in this ski resort without hitting a rejected Russian reformer.Early last week, Russia's reformist finance minister, Boris Fyodorov, walked into President Boris Yeltsin's office with a him-or-me ultimatum: Either fire the inflationary Central Bank chief, Victor Gerashchenko, who was on a ruble-printing binge to prop up inefficient industry, or I quit."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 11, 1993
MOSCOW -- Under pressure from Western governments an the International Monetary Fund, which are stepping up their aid, the Russian central bank has agreed with the Russian government for the first time on the amount of new credits it will issue.Although technical and possibly temporary, covering only the second quarter of this year, the agreement is important. The unrestrained issuing of credits by the central bank has driven Russian inflation to dangerous levels, devalued the ruble and undermined the economic reforms of President Boris N. Yeltsin.
NEWS
By William Safire | February 3, 1994
YOU CAN'T throw a snowball at the World Economic Forum in this ski resort without hitting a rejected Russian reformer.Early last week, Russia's reformist finance minister, Boris Fyodorov, walked into President Boris Yeltsin's office with a him-or-me ultimatum: Either fire the inflationary Central Bank chief, Victor Gerashchenko, who was on a ruble-printing binge to prop up inefficient industry, or I quit."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau Staff writer Mark Matthews contributed to this article | January 21, 1994
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin appointed a conservative-dominated Cabinet yesterday, provoking the departure of yet another economic adviser trusted by the West and leading to predictions of economic chaos from advocates of rapid market reforms.The Cabinet formation also generated unhappiness in Washington, where a State Department spokesman said that "the absence [in the government] of those known in the West as proponents of reform is a source of concern."The new Cabinet was a clear victory for Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, a centrist with strong ties to agrarian and industrial interests.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- The Russian government did an about-fac yesterday and lifted controversial profit limits on products ranging from food to tires.The profit-limiting decree two weeks ago, the first major policy move by new Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, had been interpreted as a sign that he planned to try to administer the economy by fiat in the old Communist style rather than working with market forces.But Boris G. Fyodorov, the Russian vice premier in charge of economics, said Mr. Chernomyrdin had signed the decree because of a "bureaucratic slip-up" and announced that the government would set no new ceilings on prices and profits except in monopolized industries.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.