Advertisement
IN THE NEWS

Fx

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | June 1, 1994
Reruns of "Fantasy Island" and "Wonder Woman," a pet show with a dog named Jack as co-host, and a morning show featuring lots of coffee and chat.This is the brave, new future of cable TV?Well, part of it, if you believe what Rupert Murdoch and Fox say about their new cable channel, fX, which arrives today. With 18 million viewer households, it's the largest launch ever for a basic cable channel.Fox calls it a "fresh, new approach to television." But there's not much evidence of that in the preview material Fox made available.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
We are supposed to be living in a new golden age of television. But you would never know that from the new series this summer. Despite months of hype about all the big names like Steven Soderbergh and Halle Berry who were going to be behind and in front of the cameras, none of the series even feels like silver at the halfway point of the season. Big names alone do not make for golden TV. In fact, sometimes the big names are only using TV to pass off inferior work that couldn't get big-screen funding.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Lynn Smith | January 1, 2008
A few years ago, it looked like Court TV was all about courtrooms, FX Network was for tough guys, and AMC ran only movies. In the coming months, however, cable TV viewers will start to see things change. Court TV has just become TruTV. FX ads will explain "There is no box" that its shows fit into. And AMC will launch its third original scripted program. As cable TV has exploded into hundreds of channels, networks must grow increasingly sophisticated to stand out amid the competition and maintain their double-digit annual growth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
  I kept thinking as I was screening the new FX series, "Fargo," that it wasn't all that impressive. And then, I looked up and realized I had been watching for three hours straight. I guess it depends on how you define impressive. At best, it's one of the finest new series of the TV year. At worst, it's definitely worth an hour of your time to check out tonight at 10 on FX. But be careful, it's easy to lose yourself as I did in this world of endless snow, hopelessly flat lands, coffee shops, down jackets, small town facades, brutality, blood, drugs and slaughter.
NEWS
By Virginia Heffernan and Virginia Heffernan,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 22, 2007
New York -- Patty Hewes frightens Glenn Close. No wonder: Hewes is an ice-eyed trial lawyer and serpentine liar who disdains white-collar violence in favor of open sadism. She never settles for $100 million, in other words, when she can put everyone through hell for a nickel more. But Close is Patty Hewes, the central character in Damages, a cloak-and-dagger legal thriller that begins Tuesday on FX. In 40 years in theater and movies, Close has appeared as Norma Desmond, Cruella de Vil and Alex Forrest, the Medusa-haired bunny boiler of Fatal Attraction.
FEATURES
January 10, 2006
Michael Chiklis (above) stars as corrupt cop Vic Mackey in the fifth-season premiere of The Shield (10 p.m.-11 p.m., FX).
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993
Merrill Lynch leads in munisMerrill Lynch & Co. ranked first among municipal bond underwriters in 1993 as the federal government investigated the industry's sales practices.Merrill managed 458 bond issues totaling $34.8 billion this year, according to preliminary figures from Securities Data Co./Bond Buyer. Those issues accounted for 12.3 percent of the total $284 billion of municipal bonds sold through Thursday. Merrill overtook Goldman, Sachs & Co., which ranked first among municipal underwriters last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | July 30, 2000
One of the most oft-asked questions of a film critic, especially this summer, is, "How does this stuff get made?" "This stuff," of course, refers to the dreck that regularly opens at the googol-plex every Friday. How it gets made is chronicled with vicious, mean-spirited, hilarious cynicism in "Action," a failed Fox comedy series that started rebroadcast on the FX Networks cable channel June 20. The first eight episodes of the show, which stars Jay Mohr as a rapacious movie producer and Illeana Douglas as a prostitute-turned-development-executive, chronicled the greed, lust and narcissism that fuel the movie business.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | March 12, 1996
During this most holy of college basketball weeks, Fox is stealing some of CBS' thunder with a former hoopster turned baseball man.The network is expected to announce today that Dave Winfield has been signed as a studio analyst for the network's baseball coverage, which begins in early June with a weekly game.Winfield, who played baseball, basketball and football at the University of Minnesota, played for a host of major-league teams, most notably the New York Yankees, and most recently with the Cleveland Indians, from whom he retired after last season.
FEATURES
October 20, 2007
Damages gets an all-day marathon today; its season finale airs Tuesday. While the intricately plotted legal thriller starring Glenn Close and Ted Danson has garnered a passionate following, the viewership has not been as sizable as FX had hoped, putting the show's return in doubt. But network executives promise there will be a satisfying conclusion. And one factor that could persuade FX to give the program a second shot: the possibility that the drama will rack up some major awards. (8 a.m.-8 p.m., FX)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
An exhibit on "The Americans," an FX series starring Keri Russell as a Soviet spy living in 1980s America, opened at the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. From background on a band of real soviet agents discovered in the U.S. to some of the wigs worn by Russell and her co-star, Matthew Rhys, in the TV series, the exhibit explores the space between social reality and fictional spy narratives. The museum is presenting "The Americans" exhibit through the end of May in conjunction with FX, as "The Americans" continues in its second season as one of cable TV's more popular series.
FEATURES
By Janene Holzberg | January 23, 2014
Holding a 3-inch-tall Tolkien-inspired wizard named Schmandalf that she fashioned out of modeling clay, Olivia Hatcher set about the painstaking process of creating a stop-motion film for her summer camp class. Using one of Maryvale Preparatory School's digital single-lens reflex cameras affixed to a tripod -- instead of holding a camera phone or a “point-and-shoot” with no adjustable settings -- the fifth-grader from Towson posed and re-posed Schmandalf to simulate human movements while photographing the figurine a couple hundred times between adjustments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | January 6, 2013
Midseason used to be a time for networks to put on series that weren't good enough to make the fall lineup. The thinking was: The money has been spent to make these episodes, so let's try to get something out of them by plugging them for shows that have bombed. But thanks to cable and huge changes in the way that people access and watch TV, midseason is in many ways now the best season for TV viewing. This is especially true when it comes to drama, the genre that network television has by and large abandoned to cable, PBS and now Web operations like Netflix because it has been deemed too expensive and risky for efficient (read: cheap)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
I don't like Charlie Sheen, and I thought the online mania over him last year after he was fired by CBS was a sign from God that American culture was in a very bad place and needed divine intervention to be saved. Given the political landscape these days, I'm not feeling any better about American culture, but I like Sheen's new FX sitcom "Anger Management"  a lot more than I thought I would. "Not only do I like it, as in, "Gee, that was a lot more fun to watch than 95 percent of the braindead network sitcoms I screen," I am impressed by it, as in, "Yikes, this thing actually looks like it might have something to say about American life today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | September 5, 2011
Plan your schedule with our list of everything going on this week. MOVIES OPENING (Friday) Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star Contagion Creature Life, Above All Warrior NOTABLE TV Monday: O's v. Yankees (1:05 p.m; MASN) When Pop Culture Saved America (special; 8 p.m.; Bio) Real Housewives of Beverly Hills (season premiere; 9 p.m.; Bravo) Patton Oswalt: Finest Hour (special; 9 p.m.; Showtime)  The Glades (season finale; 10 p.m.; A&E)
FEATURES
By Maureen Ryan and Maureen Ryan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 22, 2008
LOS ANGELES - There's big news from the Television Critics Association press tour regarding Damages: Ted Danson will be back as Arthur Frobisher on the FX show. His performance in Season 1 as the arrogant capitalist was one of the high points of the show, so that's great news. As to whether Frobisher survived being shot at the end of Season 1, well, that's not clear. FX president and general manager John Landgraf said during his remarks that Frobisher did survive, but the Damages creators would only say that because the series moves backward and forward in time, it's possible that we'll see Frobisher in a flashback when the show returns early next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
We are supposed to be living in a new golden age of television. But you would never know that from the new series this summer. Despite months of hype about all the big names like Steven Soderbergh and Halle Berry who were going to be behind and in front of the cameras, none of the series even feels like silver at the halfway point of the season. Big names alone do not make for golden TV. In fact, sometimes the big names are only using TV to pass off inferior work that couldn't get big-screen funding.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
An exhibit on "The Americans," an FX series starring Keri Russell as a Soviet spy living in 1980s America, opened at the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. From background on a band of real soviet agents discovered in the U.S. to some of the wigs worn by Russell and her co-star, Matthew Rhys, in the TV series, the exhibit explores the space between social reality and fictional spy narratives. The museum is presenting "The Americans" exhibit through the end of May in conjunction with FX, as "The Americans" continues in its second season as one of cable TV's more popular series.
FEATURES
By Lynn Smith | January 1, 2008
A few years ago, it looked like Court TV was all about courtrooms, FX Network was for tough guys, and AMC ran only movies. In the coming months, however, cable TV viewers will start to see things change. Court TV has just become TruTV. FX ads will explain "There is no box" that its shows fit into. And AMC will launch its third original scripted program. As cable TV has exploded into hundreds of channels, networks must grow increasingly sophisticated to stand out amid the competition and maintain their double-digit annual growth.
FEATURES
October 20, 2007
Damages gets an all-day marathon today; its season finale airs Tuesday. While the intricately plotted legal thriller starring Glenn Close and Ted Danson has garnered a passionate following, the viewership has not been as sizable as FX had hoped, putting the show's return in doubt. But network executives promise there will be a satisfying conclusion. And one factor that could persuade FX to give the program a second shot: the possibility that the drama will rack up some major awards. (8 a.m.-8 p.m., FX)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.