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NEWS
December 12, 2011
The so-called Congressional supercommittee was never about finances; it was always about political maneuvering, just as the "payroll tax cut" isn't about fixing the economy but might be more properly be called the "kick-the-can-down-the-road" cut. First, Social Security taxes are not included in the national budget. So, reducing such revenues will have no effect on current-year deficits. What the "payroll tax cut" will do is reduce the amount of Social Security revenue that can be borrowed by Congress to spend.
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NEWS
April 8, 2014
Thank you for covering the controversy regarding the proposed Dominion liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Cove Point ( "Calvert County Cove Point opponents, supporters flood state with comments," April 3). The Cove Point project has far-reaching potential impact on human health and environmental quality in every phase of the process - extraction, transportation, liquefaction, shipping, re-gasification and distribution of the natural gas abroad. We are especially concerned about the impact Dominion's proposal will have on climate and air quality in Maryland.
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NEWS
By Jean-Michel Cousteau | July 23, 1991
I RECENTLY met a lean young boy named Natake on a small Pacific island near no other. He accompanied me as I explored his tiny homeland, with its landscape ravaged by the phosphate industry.As we walked among land that had been stripped of trees, through a ghostly abandoned warehouse, around rusting cars and trucks, Natake said nothing. True, I was a stranger. And, true, we did not speak the same language. But at each stop we made, Natake's eyes bespoke bewilderment."Why do you care about these things?"
NEWS
By Thomas A. Firey | January 24, 2013
American workers got an unpleasant surprise this month when they received their first paychecks of 2013. The typical full-time worker, who earns about $40,145 a year, found that his two-week paycheck was $30 lighter than his last check of 2012. The lost money is the result of tax increases contained in the Jan. 1 agreement between Congress and the White House to avoid the "fiscal cliff," a package of spending cuts and tax increases intended to reduce the federal budget deficit. Though $30 doesn't sound like much, it's unwelcome for households that continue to struggle in this long-stagnant economy.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | May 23, 1995
THURSDAY 5 p.m. Heavy rain falling all over New York. Millions of cars burning gas, honking, going nowhere. I am marooned in a Fifth Avenue bus. Feels like two weeks ago I got on up at 155th Street.This could be because we're only making 50 feet an hour. Or it could be the seat. It's built for slow, poison-the-spirit torture, like those Broadway theater seats they sell at $60 apiece and you can't even keep them.Why would you want to? Maybe get a tax deduction for donating them to some friendly Latin dictator's torture division.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow and Marc Freedman | January 12, 2010
America faces many deficits - in federal and state budgets, in trade, in business and, most assuredly, in personal finance. But there is one very large deficit that may underlie all of them. We face a "posterity deficit," born out of our growing failure to think about the well-being of future generations. Most people are not much concerned with what lies ahead for the world beyond their lifetimes. Yet, decisions we make today on questions like the environment and spending will have far-ranging implications on the lives of future generations - for better or worse.
NEWS
June 21, 1997
WILL THE public's health be served? Will today's children and tomorrow's children be spared further enticement to take up a habit that will injure and perhaps destroy their well-being?Despite all the billions of dollars being flung around, despite the fierce clash of economic and political and medical interests involved in the tentative $360 billion settlement announced between the tobacco industry and most of the nation's state attorneys general, the nation must be assured that the health of this and future generations is paramount.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,sun reporter | April 15, 2007
Leo Bretholz held up a book as thick as a phone directory. Printed within are 74,000 names, enough to populate a small city. The names represent inhabitants of France who were deported to death camps during the Holocaust. And Bretholz's name is one of them. Though millions died amid the terrors of the Holocaust, the 86-year-old is one who survived - part of a group that dwindles with each passing year. To ensure the lessons are shared with future generations after he is gone, Bretholz and other Holocaust survivors are working with teenagers and professional storytellers to share their experiences.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 18, 2007
You would think in a city as wealthy and ambitious as Los Angeles there would be more direct generosity directed to the museums. The idea of building this place for future generations is not really up to the level of the city at all." - MICHAEL GOVAN, director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, on donations of art to the museum
NEWS
July 15, 2011
President James Madison said each generation should bear the burden of its own wars, not foist their expense off on future generations. Since Barack Obama became president, he and the Congress have been responsible for one-third of the current national debt. Record spending for entitlements, war, bailouts to banks, businesses and states have paved the way for future unfunded liabilities of up to $100 trillion. Obama and the Democrats, who hold to the Keynesian theory of economics, spout the class warfare argument that we need to tax corporate jet owners and raise taxes on millionaires and billionaires to preserve the sacred cows of big government.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
It is unfortunate that commentator Charles Campbell's recent criticism of the current administration's handling of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline was so supercilious ("D.C.'s Keystone Kops," Jan. 30). He made valid points: Wind and solar power are inconstant and must be supplemented. Their installations can be intrusive and demand lots of space. And the broader question of our energy problem is enormously complex. However, that does not justify our failure to invest in alternative energy sources the way other countries have.
NEWS
December 12, 2011
The so-called Congressional supercommittee was never about finances; it was always about political maneuvering, just as the "payroll tax cut" isn't about fixing the economy but might be more properly be called the "kick-the-can-down-the-road" cut. First, Social Security taxes are not included in the national budget. So, reducing such revenues will have no effect on current-year deficits. What the "payroll tax cut" will do is reduce the amount of Social Security revenue that can be borrowed by Congress to spend.
NEWS
September 15, 2011
The Sun today comments on arguments made by Republican candidates for president on Social Security ("Social Security sets off sparks," Sept. 14). While acknowledging that the financing of Social Security in its present state is a "problem," The Sun maintains with an apparently straight face that it is a problem that can be "easily solved. " Really? If that is so, please explain why that hasn't happened in almost 30 years since the last Social Security reform. The Sun suggests that possible solutions include raising the age for eligibility as well as capping cost of living adjustments.
NEWS
July 15, 2011
President James Madison said each generation should bear the burden of its own wars, not foist their expense off on future generations. Since Barack Obama became president, he and the Congress have been responsible for one-third of the current national debt. Record spending for entitlements, war, bailouts to banks, businesses and states have paved the way for future unfunded liabilities of up to $100 trillion. Obama and the Democrats, who hold to the Keynesian theory of economics, spout the class warfare argument that we need to tax corporate jet owners and raise taxes on millionaires and billionaires to preserve the sacred cows of big government.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 28, 2011
When I was in high school in the late 1960s, I hung out with a pack of friends that changed up depending on the day's agenda. There might be a dozen of us at the mall or the movies, or three of us pulling an all-nighter on a physics paper. We were always picking each other up in cars and going someplace else. Though there were hints of romance now and again, none of us had officially paired off as a couple. My suburban high school had only a handful of African-American students in my graduating class of 600, but one of them, Walter, was a member of our pack.
NEWS
February 22, 2011
The controversy over the naming of Negro Mountain is really just the tip of the iceberg. As a white person, I have long been offended every time I drive by White Marsh Mall. "White" is a term that we just don't use anymore. Therefore we should change everything to do with White Marsh to Caucasian Marsh so the racially explosive terminology is wiped clean and we can protect future generations from the bigotry that has long tainted that place that is next to Perry Hall. Then we'll need to deal with the deeply disturbing towns of Indian Head, Berlin and Rising Sun. Seriously?
NEWS
January 1, 2009
Just when you thought you couldn't stand another minute of 2008, the world's timekeepers made it longer. Yesterday, in the blink of an eye, they added an extra second to place official clocks in sync with the planet's rotation. The problem is that while atomic clocks tick on with annoying precision, Earth's rotational spin is actually slowing down, extending the solar day. The last leap second was added Dec. 31, 2005. If clocks weren't reset, future generations could eventually face early morning sunsets and find themselves cheering the New Year's Eve ball dropping in the bright sunshine.
NEWS
By Pearl Duncan | January 7, 2007
Last month, judges in the reparations case in federal court in Chicago ruled that the plaintiffs - "American descendants of slaves" - could sue the defendants - companies that participated in and benefited from slavery - for consumer fraud if the companies hid the history of their slave-related activities to attract customers who would not do business with them if the details were known. The companies can be sued for misleading consumers by concealing their involvement in the 19th-century American slave trade.
NEWS
June 21, 2010
The appeal of great works of art is timeless, but the great museums that house them must constantly keep up with the times. Museum directors know they can't let a leaky roof or a malfunctioning climate-control system spoil the pleasure visitors expect. Even the décor of the settings in which art is enjoyed — the colors on the walls, the shape of the galleries, the style of the picture frames — has to be updated periodically to keep pace with changing fashion and tastes. So news that the Baltimore Museum of Art, one of the stars in the city's cultural firmament, is embarking on an ambitious, $24 million expansion and renovation shows that museum director Doreen Bolger remains committed to the mission she announced upon her arrival in 1998: expanding the museum's audience, making its offerings more accessible to visitors and, above all, maintaining its reputation as a world-class venue for exhibitions and scholarly research.
NEWS
By Rosemary Faya Prola | April 7, 2010
Right now, we are being urged to complete and return our census forms. The government's lighthearted ads illustrate some of the benefits of participation in the decennial count for us, our families and our communities: appropriate representation in Congress, equitable funding for schools and adequate public health care. As someone engaged in historical research, however, the census — along with past censuses — provides another benefit for me: the ability to reconstruct the lives of Americans who lived in past decades — in some cases, more than 200 years ago. As a preservationist, I use the population schedules of earlier censuses to learn more about the owners, architects and builders of houses, schools, churches, factories, farms, bridges, cemeteries and gardens — all of the physical remnants that represent the social and cultural development of the United States.
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