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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 22, 1997
Chris Fussell, one of the Orioles' most highly regarded prospects, saw his tough season continue yesterday when the host Binghamton Mets ripped him for eight runs in an 11-4 Double-A Eastern League win over the Bowie Baysox.Fussell (1-6) lasted 2 1/3 innings, allowing six hits and three walks.In other Baysox news, right-handed pitcher Matt Snyder and catcher Melvin Rosario were named to the Double-A All-Star team. The July 7 game in San Antonio will pit players from American League and National League affiliates.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | July 12, 2006
Recently I spent a few days in corn heaven. That would be the cornfields of the Eastern Shore, where, thanks to a "big drink" provided by the late June rainfall, the corn crop was thriving, growing faster than condos. The sweet corn sold in the farmers' market and even supermarkets showed up with its husks and silks still intact. This is a good sign, one that signals the beginning of the real corn season. In the winter, I have bought Florida corn in those peek-a-boo packages. These are the ones that present partially husked ears of corn, wrapped in plastic, offering a glimpse of the kernels.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1997
FREDERICK -- With a roster depleted by promotions and injuries, the Frederick Keys have struggled in the second half of the Carolina League season. But last night the Northern Division's first-half champions warmed up for the playoffs with a 3-0 victory over Wilmington behind Chris Fussell.In his best outing of the season, Fussell (3-3) went the distance for the first time and allowed only five hits, all singles. It was the Keys' first complete-game shutout of the year.Wilmington (25-42 second half)
NEWS
January 27, 2006
On January 22, 2006, MIRIAM MAY NORMAN (nee Fritz); beloved wife of the late Alfred Norman and the late James H. Logue Sr.; devoted mother of Margaret E. Fussell and husband Larry of Ocean City, MD., and the late James H. Logue; loving grandmother of Susan L. Fussell of Arlington, VA.; and sister of Howard H. Fritz and wife Delores and the late Ida M. Jones and the late Edward H. Fritz. Memorial service will be held on Saturday at 11 A.M. at the STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14)
SPORTS
By Jason LaCanfora and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1996
Another Orioles pitching prospect is hurt and one may be on the way back.Frederick's Chris Fussell, one of several young pitchers the Orioles are watching closely, could miss the rest of the season with an elbow problem. Meanwhile, Armando Benitez made his first rehab start since his elbow injury with promising results.Fussell, who was 5-2 with a 2.81 ERA for the Single-A Keys, will have his elbow evaluated today to determine the severity of his injury. With but three weeks remaining in Frederick's season, Fussell may not return.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
ATLANTA -- Manager Ray Miller described it as the most difficult thing he has ever had to do in the game. Jesse Orosco stopped by for an embrace. Before a game that otherwise held no meaning, the Orioles turned away a piece of their heart.Nearing the end of spring training, the club made a gut-wrenching decision yesterday when it released longtime starting catcher and clubhouse pillar Chris Hoiles, then replaced his right-handed bat by trading pitching prospect Chris Fussell to the Kansas City Royals for veteran outfielder/first baseman Jeff Conine.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
To some, H. L. Mencken is Baltimore's sage -- his hyperbolic biting criticism are the words of pure truth. To others, he is Baltimore's scourge -- an anti-Semitic bigot and woman hater.But Mencken really was an artist who had a love for words and a magical way of crafting them, Paul Fussell, award-winning author and University of Pennsylvania professor, told a packed room of Mencken lovers at the revered writer's 117th birthday anniversary celebration yesterday at the Enoch Pratt Free Library on Cathedral Street.
NEWS
November 6, 2004
On November 3, 2004, ALFRED NORMAN beloved husband for 63 years of Miriam M. Norman (nee Fritz), devoted father of Margaret E. Fussell and her husband Larry of Ocean City, MD, stepfather of the late James H. Logue, grandfather of Susan L. Fussell of Arlington, VA. Mr. Norman was born June 13, 1910 in Essen, Germany and came to the USA in 1929 settling in Baltimore. He was a master woodworking craftsman all his life, having learned the trade of cabinetmaking during his youth in Germany. His clientele included customers from the Greater Baltimore and Washington DC areas.
NEWS
January 27, 2006
On January 22, 2006, MIRIAM MAY NORMAN (nee Fritz); beloved wife of the late Alfred Norman and the late James H. Logue Sr.; devoted mother of Margaret E. Fussell and husband Larry of Ocean City, MD., and the late James H. Logue; loving grandmother of Susan L. Fussell of Arlington, VA.; and sister of Howard H. Fritz and wife Delores and the late Ida M. Jones and the late Edward H. Fritz. Memorial service will be held on Saturday at 11 A.M. at the STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14)
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | April 5, 1992
As Paul Fussell sees it, we can only remember crucial moments in our lives when the facts can be made to fit one of a small number of fictional plots, the roots of which date back thousands of years.Speaking at a scientific and cultural symposium on memory at Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday, the author of "The Great War and Modern Memory" said we use the tremendous power of stories and myths to shape our past. In turn, those myths seem to determine which memories we keep and which we toss away.
NEWS
November 6, 2004
On November 3, 2004, ALFRED NORMAN beloved husband for 63 years of Miriam M. Norman (nee Fritz), devoted father of Margaret E. Fussell and her husband Larry of Ocean City, MD, stepfather of the late James H. Logue, grandfather of Susan L. Fussell of Arlington, VA. Mr. Norman was born June 13, 1910 in Essen, Germany and came to the USA in 1929 settling in Baltimore. He was a master woodworking craftsman all his life, having learned the trade of cabinetmaking during his youth in Germany. His clientele included customers from the Greater Baltimore and Washington DC areas.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 2, 2004
FRIDAY'S Nightline -- the one Maryland-based Sinclair Broadcast Group goofily denounced as "motivated by a political agenda to undermine the efforts of the United States in Iraq" and refused to air on its ABC-affiliated television stations -- was titled, "The Fallen," and somewhere Paul Fussell must have been amused. To Fussell -- professor emeritus of English literature at the University of Pennsylvania, skilled curmudgeon, connoisseur of irony, grand essayist on matters of war and culture -- anything in modern media called "The Fallen" would hark back to a bygone age of high diction and reality-masking euphemisms, and essentially would glorify war. In Fussell's seminal work, The Great War and Modern Memory, he presents a list of the noble and poetic language that once lived in Europe and supposedly died in the mustard clouds of World War I -- danger was "peril," the enemy "the foe," to die was "to perish," and the dead were "the fallen."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Special to the Sun | September 7, 2003
The Boys' Crusade: The American Infantry in Northwestern Europe, 1944-1945, by Paul Fussell. Modern Library. 208 pages. $19.95. Paul Fussell, who has written widely on war, knows firsthand the absolute terror and brutality that combat can inflict upon adolescent infantryman. He was a 22-year-old lieutenant leading a rifle platoon in the 103rd Infantry Division when he was severely wounded in France during World War II. In this crisply written, profoundly moving and all-too-vivid narrative, Fussell chronicles the role of American soldiers during the last full year of the war. The campaign from the bloody beaches of Normandy to the triumphant fall of Berlin in the spring of 1945 is the framework on which he has chosen to tell the story of the effects of war on those who were destined to fight it. "It should strike everyone as funny that armies at war are insane institutions devoted to two quite contradictory operations, both brought to the highest technological standard," he observes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M.G. Lord and By M.G. Lord,Special to the Sun | December 8, 2002
Uniforms: Why We Are What We Wear. By Paul Fussell. Houghton Mifflin. 224 pages. $22. I have been a fan of Paul Fussell for years -- not just of his rich, beautifully written World War I history, The Great War and Modern Memory, but also of his 1983 effort, Class: A Guide Through the American Status System, whose winsome, cranky voice was eclipsed only by its stunning accuracy. Thus I eagerly looked forward to Uniforms: Why We Are What We Wear. This book is not, however, all that I had hoped it would be. The first disappointment was that it focused on uniforms in a literal way -- not, say, the gray flannel suit of mid-20th-century businessmen or the baggy trousers of contemporary hip-hop types, but clothing actually issued by institutions like the military and the post office.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | April 3, 1999
A broken-down body for a slimmed-down body. That's how you evaluate Chris Hoiles for Jeff Conine, and never mind the other particulars. Chris Fussell, a young pitcher with little chance of ever joining the Orioles' rotation, was merely the bait for Conine.The release of Hoiles is a sad event for anyone who knew "Tractor," a humble, hard-working throwback who spent a decade in the organization after arriving in the Fred Lynn trade. Still, it had to be done. Hoiles, physically unable to catch and a liability at first base, had turned into the right-handed equivalent of Harold Baines.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
ATLANTA -- Manager Ray Miller described it as the most difficult thing he has ever had to do in the game. Jesse Orosco stopped by for an embrace. Before a game that otherwise held no meaning, the Orioles turned away a piece of their heart.Nearing the end of spring training, the club made a gut-wrenching decision yesterday when it released longtime starting catcher and clubhouse pillar Chris Hoiles, then replaced his right-handed bat by trading pitching prospect Chris Fussell to the Kansas City Royals for veteran outfielder/first baseman Jeff Conine.
FEATURES
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff Writer | November 8, 1994
The defendant, Kingsley Amis, stands accused of incorrigibly right-wing views and -- worse still -- attitudes deeply offensive to women, all expressed vigorously and repeatedly in his novels.The counsel for the defense, Paul Fussell, has filed a spirited brief on behalf of his client, who is also a friend. He concedes that Mr. Amis went a bit potty about the Red Menace during the years before it collapsed under its own weight. But the charge of anti-feminism, he argues, rises mainly from the vulgar error of misidentifying characters in a novel with the author -- which is particularly unfair to Mr. Amis, who has created some of the most thoroughly disagreeable characters in contemporary British fiction.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | August 23, 1992
Chicago -- To know the story of corn is to know the story of America, says Betty Fussell.She deems corn the most important food to spring from the black, loamy soil of the nation's breadbasket and so has written "The Story of Corn" (Knopf, $30), a 333-page tome on the myths, history, culture and agriculture of America's quintessential crop.Lend her an ear, if you will, and Ms. Fussell will tell a fascinating story that touches so many aspects of our culture.Learn that corn is used in hundreds of products, from corn soup to ethanol.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1999
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Chris Fussell looks around the clubhouse and sees the numbers. Manager Ray Miller easily could pull 12 names and complete his staff, but there's always room for a little competition. And Fussell intends to engage in his share.On paper, there's no room for Fussell on the major-league roster. If everything falls into place, the rotation will consist of Opening Day starter Mike Mussina, Scott Erickson, Juan Guzman, Scott Kamieniecki and Sidney Ponson.The bullpen will include right-handers Mike Timlin, Heathcliff Slocumb, Mike Fetters and Ricky Bones, and left-handers Jesse Orosco, Arthur Rhodes and Doug Johns.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
Any semblance of hope that the Orioles had of bucking tremendous odds and landing the wild card went flying into the left-field seats last night. One bad pitch, one mighty swing, and one more reason to plan for next season.Shying away from the fastball that had gotten him ahead in the count, Armando Benitez served up a two-run homer to Ivan Rodriguez in the ninth inning to snatch away Chris Fussell's first major-league victory and end the Orioles' winning streak at six games with a 6-5 loss to the Texas Rangers before 41,363 at Camden Yards.
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