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Fuselage

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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
A Catonsville third-grader is on his way to the Scripps National Spelling Bee after winning the seventh annual Baltimore Spelling Bee on Saturday. Shaheer Imam, an 8-year-old who attends Al-Rahmah School, correctly spelled "fuselage" in the 17th round to snag the title. Forty-nine spellers from Baltimore City and Baltimore County competed in the bee, held at Towson University. Elizabeth Bernatowicz of Masters Academy won second place and Lance Pacis of the St. Clement Mary Hofbauer School took third.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
A Catonsville third-grader is on his way to the Scripps National Spelling Bee after winning the seventh annual Baltimore Spelling Bee on Saturday. Shaheer Imam, an 8-year-old who attends Al-Rahmah School, correctly spelled "fuselage" in the 17th round to snag the title. Forty-nine spellers from Baltimore City and Baltimore County competed in the bee, held at Towson University. Elizabeth Bernatowicz of Masters Academy won second place and Lance Pacis of the St. Clement Mary Hofbauer School took third.
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NEWS
April 6, 2011
For an airplane fuselage to be torn open ("Southwest grounds jets after hole opens midair," April 3) this particular plane could not have been thoroughly and timely inspected for a long, long time. After this horrific occurrence, now the inspections begin. It seems to me that the inspection process is certainly not what it is "cracked up" to be. Ruth Fried, Owings Mills
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2011
It didn't quite measure up to making an emergency landing in the middle of the Hudson River, but as Harvey White stood beside the 120-foot chunk of airplane on a ramp off Interstate 95 near Perryville on Monday, he felt a sense of conquest. White, a resident of Rising Sun, and his wife, Ruth, had spent an hour and a half in their SUV trying to track down a unique procession: a caravan of 35 vehicles accompanying the fuselage of the US Airways plane that splash-landed in January 2009.
NEWS
December 1, 2005
On November 29, 2005, ELLEN EMMA REINER, loving sister of Raymond M. Reiner, Mildred R. Reiner and the late Frederick W. Reiner Jr, and Charles P. Reiner. Cherished Aunt of Catherine Martin, Steve Reiner and Ruth Brisson. Friends may call at the family owned Leonard J. Ruck Inc., Funeral Home 5305 Harford Rd. (at Echodale) on Friday, 10 to 11 A.M. with the funeral service to follow at 11 A.M. Interment Baltimore Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Salvation Army 1400 Fuselage Avenue, Baltimore, MD, 21220.
NEWS
December 14, 2008
On Dec. 9, 1953, an experimental jet plane, a B-57 jet by some reports, carrying a pilot and a co-pilot from the Glenn L. Martin plant at Middle River, exploded in midair about a mile above Bel Air. The wreckage was strewn for miles over the countryside around what is now Churchville Road and the John Carroll School. The plane's burning fuselage was projected over the Homestead property of John D. Worthington and landed in a cornfield on the farm of Dr. M.R. Wagner. One man died and another was seriously injured.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, Liz F. Kay and Andrea K. Walker and Jamie Smith Hopkins, Liz F. Kay and Andrea K. Walker,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | July 15, 2009
As federal aviation safety officials investigated Tuesday why a Baltimore-bound jet was forced into an emergency landing by a football-size hole in its passenger cabin, Southwest Airlines said it found no other problems in a mass inspection of its planes. The Boeing 737-300 took off in Nashville, Tenn., and landed safely in West Virginia about 5 p.m. Monday after the 1-foot-by-1-foot hole opened up in the rear of the aircraft. The National Transportation Safety Board sent two investigators to the scene and could issue a preliminary report about the incident as soon as next week, said spokesman Keith Holloway.
FEATURES
Michael Dresser and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
Southwest Airlines built its brand with a wink and a smile, bringing its customers a winning combination of low fares and high spirits. But the last week or so has brought a challenge in which price chopping and good-humored flight crews wouldn't cut it. After a section of the fuselage of one of its Boeing 737-300 airlines gave way April 1, tearing a hole in the roof while it flew more than 30,000 feet above Arizona, the airline faced the test of...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 8, 2007
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- In the latest of a series of transportation disasters in Indonesia, a passenger airliner slammed into the ground yesterday on landing at the city of Yogyakarta and burst into flames, killing at least 21 people and leaving many badly injured. Survivors said the plane shuddered before landing, hit the ground with a hard jolt and slid off the end of the runway into a rice field, filling with smoke and darkness before erupting in flames and explosions. The cause of the accident was unclear.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1999
Residents of Middle River are nursing a huge headache -- a developer's plan to build a pharmacy in their community.Homeowners in the eastern Baltimore County communities of Victory Villa and Aero Acres have been battling a proposed CVS/pharmacy, featuring a drive-through pickup window, at Martin Boulevard and Compass Road where a patch of woods stands.Opponents say the business would choke local streets with added traffic and ruin the quality of life with morning noises such as trucks emptying trash bins.
FEATURES
Michael Dresser and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
Southwest Airlines built its brand with a wink and a smile, bringing its customers a winning combination of low fares and high spirits. But the last week or so has brought a challenge in which price chopping and good-humored flight crews wouldn't cut it. After a section of the fuselage of one of its Boeing 737-300 airlines gave way April 1, tearing a hole in the roof while it flew more than 30,000 feet above Arizona, the airline faced the test of...
NEWS
April 6, 2011
For an airplane fuselage to be torn open ("Southwest grounds jets after hole opens midair," April 3) this particular plane could not have been thoroughly and timely inspected for a long, long time. After this horrific occurrence, now the inspections begin. It seems to me that the inspection process is certainly not what it is "cracked up" to be. Ruth Fried, Owings Mills
TRAVEL
By Yeganeh June Torbati and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2011
Southwest Airlines expects to run its full schedule Tuesday after three days with hundreds of canceled flights following an incident Friday in which the metal surface of a plane burst open during flight and a weekend during which small cracks were found on other planes. The airline, Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport's dominant carrier, canceled about 70 flights nationwide Monday, as workers continued inspecting the company's aircraft. About 300 flights were canceled Sunday.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2011
Southwest Airlines planned to cancel 100 more flights nationwide Monday as workers continue inspecting the company's aircraft after the fuselage skin of a plane burst open mid-flight last week and small cracks were found on other planes Sunday. The Monday cancellations were announced in a release on the airline's website, which also urged passengers to check on their flight status at southwest.com . The airline said it expects to complete inspections by late Tuesday. Monday's planned cancellations add to the 300 flights canceled Sunday.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, Liz F. Kay and Andrea K. Walker and Jamie Smith Hopkins, Liz F. Kay and Andrea K. Walker,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | July 15, 2009
As federal aviation safety officials investigated Tuesday why a Baltimore-bound jet was forced into an emergency landing by a football-size hole in its passenger cabin, Southwest Airlines said it found no other problems in a mass inspection of its planes. The Boeing 737-300 took off in Nashville, Tenn., and landed safely in West Virginia about 5 p.m. Monday after the 1-foot-by-1-foot hole opened up in the rear of the aircraft. The National Transportation Safety Board sent two investigators to the scene and could issue a preliminary report about the incident as soon as next week, said spokesman Keith Holloway.
NEWS
December 14, 2008
On Dec. 9, 1953, an experimental jet plane, a B-57 jet by some reports, carrying a pilot and a co-pilot from the Glenn L. Martin plant at Middle River, exploded in midair about a mile above Bel Air. The wreckage was strewn for miles over the countryside around what is now Churchville Road and the John Carroll School. The plane's burning fuselage was projected over the Homestead property of John D. Worthington and landed in a cornfield on the farm of Dr. M.R. Wagner. One man died and another was seriously injured.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 1996
SMITHTOWN, N.Y. -- Stymied by a string of dead ends and partial hints, the hunt for the cause of the blast that destroyed Trans World Airlines Flight 800 shifted several miles east yesterday.Investigators had hoped that the best clues about the site and nature of the explosion that tore the jumbo jet apart would be found in the debris fields closest to Kennedy International Airport, which contained the first pieces that fell from the airplane.But with almost every scrap of aircraft retrieved from those areas, Navy divers switched their attention to the wreckage that traveled the farthest before plunging into the Atlantic.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 1996
The front end of Trans World Airlines Flight 800 broke away, plunging toward the Atlantic Ocean, while the rest of the plane continued to hurtle through the air, engines still running, before bursting into an enormous fireball seconds later, law enforcement officials said yesterday.Several federal law enforcement officials said the new finding strengthened their belief that a bomb, possibly stored in the front cargo hold, blew off part of the forward portion of the plane.Although there are no forensic tests that have definitively shown that an explosive device caused the crash, officials said yesterday that a bomb was the most likely reason for the Boeing 747 to break apart, yet manage to stay aloft until the rest exploded on July 17, nine miles off East Moriches, N.Y. All 230 people aboard were killed.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 12, 2008
As a nervous flier, I wasn't too thrilled to hear Southwest Airlines could be fined a record $10.2 million for failing to inspect planes for cracks in the fuselage. This isn't the sort of thing that makes nervous fliers feel "free to move about the country," I can tell you that. In fact, when the story broke a few days ago, I could imagine hundreds of my jittery brothers and sisters who were flying Southwest at the time, opening a newspaper at 30,000 feet and seeing the headline: "AIRLINE FACES PENALTY ON PLANE CRACKS."
BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | March 8, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Inspectors at the Federal Aviation Administration warned superiors about problems with safety checks at Southwest Airlines, a powerful congressman said yesterday. But for nearly three years, he said, their concerns were ignored. Rep. James L. Oberstar, chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, blasted the federal aviation watchdog for "complacency" that he said "has likely set in at the highest levels." The Minnesota Democrat said a committee investigation revealed "a pattern of regulatory abuse and widespread regulatory lapses" that allowed Southwest to continue flying aircraft that were past due for required safety checks so the airline "could conveniently schedule them for inspection without disrupting their commercial schedule."
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