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By Linda Bennett | June 9, 1991
The furniture industry is becoming better attuned to environmental issues, because of both increased concern on the part of consumers and stepped-up governmental regulations and guidelines.In addition to concerns about the use of tropical woods harvested from endangered rain forest areas, the industry is facing questions about chemicals used in the manufacturing process.Recent revisions to the Clean Air Act require furniture manufacturers to limit emissions of volatile organic compounds -- known as VOCs -- used in their plants, including those from solvent-based paints, stains and lacquers.
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By Rosemary McClure and Rosemary McClure,Los Angeles Times | September 5, 2004
The slogan winked at me from the rear window of a bright red Chrysler minivan parked in a furniture showroom lot. "Veni, vidi, VISA: I came, I saw, I charged." It seemed fitting. We were in High Point, N.C., the self-proclaimed home furnishings capital of the world. An indulgent shopper can do serious damage to the household budget in a place like this, where a single Oscar de la Renta dining room table sells for upwards of $22,000. But if you're in the market for furniture, nowhere else in the nation compares.
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FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 8, 1995
In the past few years I've noticed that furniture manufacturers are not routinely including drawers in smaller tables. Bedside pieces, end tables and even writing tables now seem to be made without slide-in/slide-out storage compartments. What we're getting instead may be an open under-shelf or shelves behind double doors.This is a real loss, I think. After all, the drawer has been with us for a very long time. According to historians of the decorative arts, it was invented by the Chinese in the early part of the 13th century.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Staff | February 29, 2004
When Karen Graveline moved into her South Baltimore rowhouse six years ago, she had to leave a lot of furniture behind. The sofas and tables that fit so comfortably in her Silver Spring home wouldn't squeeze through the tight doorway of her new place. After talking to neighbors who had to remove windows or jam favorite pieces through narrow corridors, the graphic designer realized her new city was ripe for a line of "rowhouse ready" furniture. Graveline and her husband, Stanley, began collecting vintage chairs, tables and sofas.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | December 31, 1995
From tiny custom shops to mass-market retailers, the centuries-old art of painted furniture is back, despite prices that can go from about $1,000 to $7,500 or more.Why now? Industry observers have different theories.Nancy High, director of communications for the American Furniture Manufacturers in High Point, N.C., sees it as a way for people to express their individuality in a high-tech world."When you collect art, it is an expression of your preferences and your taste," she says. "This furniture is art in a different medium.
NEWS
By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub and By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub,KNIGHT RIDDER/ TRIBUNE | October 15, 2000
When we think of Cuba, we picture the things we heard about but never saw - the sensuous Havana of the '50s, where Frank Sinatra sang at the Tropicana and Ernest Hemingway dined at El Floridita. Combine these feelings of nostalgia with America's obsession for everything Latin - from the first Latin Grammy awards to Cuban coffee - and it was only a matter of time before interior design caught Cuban fever. "Americans have always been fascinated with Cuba because there is a certain mystique about it," said Jackie Hirschhault, vice president of public relations for the American Furniture Manufacturers Association.
FEATURES
By Linda Bennett and Linda Bennett,Contributing Writer | January 9, 1994
The beginning of a new year brings out the trend forecaster in all of us.Something about trading in those dog-eared old calendars for fresh new ones makes us feel comfortable predicting what's hot and what's not for the next 12 months.The old year was marked by a confusing mixture of home-related trends.New and existing house sales were brisk for much of 1993, thanks to low interest rates and pent-up demand. But business for furniture manufacturers and retailers merely had "improved to slow" by the end of the year, according to Linda Jones of Masco, a giant corporation involved in both home building and home furnishings.
FEATURES
By Linda Bennett and Linda Bennett,Contributing Writer | May 9, 1993
High Point, N.C.--An optimistic American Modern style emerged last month at the massive International Home Furnishings Market in High Point, N.C., where more than 65,000 furniture manufacturers, retailers and interior designers gather twice a year for this country's largest introductory furniture market.Not to be confused with the hard-edged, glass-and-steel, minimalist contemporary category, this new modern style borrows timeless elements from the past but reinterprets them for family life in the '90s.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun Staff | February 29, 2004
When Karen Graveline moved into her South Baltimore rowhouse six years ago, she had to leave a lot of furniture behind. The sofas and tables that fit so comfortably in her Silver Spring home wouldn't squeeze through the tight doorway of her new place. After talking to neighbors who had to remove windows or jam favorite pieces through narrow corridors, the graphic designer realized her new city was ripe for a line of "rowhouse ready" furniture. Graveline and her husband, Stanley, began collecting vintage chairs, tables and sofas.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | September 20, 1992
'Fess up. Given a choice, you'd rather stretch out on you sofa and watch a movie at home than in a theater. You are not alone.Sixty-seven percent of the American public prefers taking in a film at home, according to the Electronics Industry Association, a trade organization that includes manufacturers of consumer electronics and telecommunications.This continuing trend has spawned new ideas in design and technology from both the electronics and furniture industries, seeking to give the consumers everything they want in the home theater.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
Seated on the living room couch in her Reisterstown condominium with a stack of financial paperwork neatly arranged in a blue binder at her feet, Darlene Schapiro was poised to take the plunge into bankruptcy. "If I don't file, they are going to take everything from me," said Schapiro, a 49-year-old widow and mother of two who has amassed about $70,000 in credit card debt over the past five years and fears she could lose her home. Schapiro is part of a rising tide of Americans who are turning to bankruptcy to rescue their lives.
NEWS
By William Hageman and By William Hageman,Special to the Sun | November 24, 2002
The next time you drop anchor into your recliner to watch a football game -- and don't hear the sound of wood cracking or find yourself flat on the floor amid a pile of kindling -- you probably can thank some folks at Mississippi State University. It's there at the Furniture Research Unit, part of the school's Forest and Wildlife Research Center, that items such as recliners and sofas are pushed -- and punched, pulled and jiggled -- to the limit and beyond to make sure they'll be able to withstand the stress consumers put on them.
NEWS
By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub and By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub,KNIGHT RIDDER/ TRIBUNE | October 15, 2000
When we think of Cuba, we picture the things we heard about but never saw - the sensuous Havana of the '50s, where Frank Sinatra sang at the Tropicana and Ernest Hemingway dined at El Floridita. Combine these feelings of nostalgia with America's obsession for everything Latin - from the first Latin Grammy awards to Cuban coffee - and it was only a matter of time before interior design caught Cuban fever. "Americans have always been fascinated with Cuba because there is a certain mystique about it," said Jackie Hirschhault, vice president of public relations for the American Furniture Manufacturers Association.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | December 5, 1999
The world is divided into two groups of people: men, who want to put a Barcalounger in the living room, and women, who don't. Can the gender gap in home decorating be bridged? Can a husband and wife buy a piece of furniture together without damaging their marriage? And isn't the question academic since women do all the furniture shopping anyway?Not so, says Steven Roberts, who with his wife, Meg, is the author of "A Home for All Seasons" (Abrams, 1998)."Men have become more involved, more interested in how their homes are decorated," he says.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
James Mueller, who came out of a rough Southeast Baltimore neighborhood to become the head of a prominent furniture company, died Wednesday of brain cancer at his home in Pembroke Pines, Fla. He was 60.Born a cab driver's son in O'Donnell Heights, Mr. Mueller graduated from Patterson High School before volunteering for military service with a number of his friends."
NEWS
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | January 3, 1999
An island liberates a kitchen from its claustrophobic confines, working like a hinge, a tie that binds the kitchen - and, more important, the cook - to a dining room or family room. Yet it distinguishes the cooking area from other spaces.Except for high-tech appliances, nothing has changed the form and function of the American kitchen more in the last decade than the advent of the island. It has allowed the kitchen's fourth wall to be eliminated without sacrificing storage space and work surfaces that, ordinarily, would have been appended to that wall.
NEWS
By William Hageman and By William Hageman,Special to the Sun | November 24, 2002
The next time you drop anchor into your recliner to watch a football game -- and don't hear the sound of wood cracking or find yourself flat on the floor amid a pile of kindling -- you probably can thank some folks at Mississippi State University. It's there at the Furniture Research Unit, part of the school's Forest and Wildlife Research Center, that items such as recliners and sofas are pushed -- and punched, pulled and jiggled -- to the limit and beyond to make sure they'll be able to withstand the stress consumers put on them.
NEWS
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | January 3, 1999
An island liberates a kitchen from its claustrophobic confines, working like a hinge, a tie that binds the kitchen - and, more important, the cook - to a dining room or family room. Yet it distinguishes the cooking area from other spaces.Except for high-tech appliances, nothing has changed the form and function of the American kitchen more in the last decade than the advent of the island. It has allowed the kitchen's fourth wall to be eliminated without sacrificing storage space and work surfaces that, ordinarily, would have been appended to that wall.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi and Charlyne Varkonyi,FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL | December 31, 1995
From tiny custom shops to mass-market retailers, the centuries-old art of painted furniture is back, despite prices that can go from about $1,000 to $7,500 or more.Why now? Industry observers have different theories.Nancy High, director of communications for the American Furniture Manufacturers in High Point, N.C., sees it as a way for people to express their individuality in a high-tech world."When you collect art, it is an expression of your preferences and your taste," she says. "This furniture is art in a different medium.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 8, 1995
In the past few years I've noticed that furniture manufacturers are not routinely including drawers in smaller tables. Bedside pieces, end tables and even writing tables now seem to be made without slide-in/slide-out storage compartments. What we're getting instead may be an open under-shelf or shelves behind double doors.This is a real loss, I think. After all, the drawer has been with us for a very long time. According to historians of the decorative arts, it was invented by the Chinese in the early part of the 13th century.
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