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By Chicago Tribune | February 27, 1994
The offerings at a small, quiet New Orleans auction three years ago were "fair to middling" for Derrick Beard until he saw a note in small print in the catalog about a four-poster cherry bed.The bed, made by African-American craftsman Henry Boyd, went without a bid during an unimpressive first round of the auction."
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
David Klein, a well-known Baltimore artist who turned found materials into high-end pieces of furniture that captured the gritty eccentricity of his hometown, died of colon cancer June 6 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson. He was 71. "He was always in and around Baltimore. Everybody knew him. He was like Gertrude Stein. He had his studio and exhibits, and everybody always visited," said Anita Klein, his wife of 49 years. "He was a one-of-a-kind of Baltimore. " "His pieces, without question, are museum quality," said David Hayden, a close childhood friend and one of the largest collectors, along with his wife, JoAnn, of Mr. Klein's work.
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By Beverly Hall Lawrence and Beverly Hall Lawrence,Newsday | November 3, 1991
High Point, N.C. -- Americans, some furniture makers believe, are sick of imitating the lifestyles of long-dead Europeans and are growing bored with the expensive, ball-and-claw furnishings cranked out for generations here in the center of the country's furniture industry.In the past, manufacturers tended to follow a safe, herd mentality, resting on long-held notions that Americans crave furniture with the historical integrity and romance of French or English aristocrats.While there was much in this same old vein, simply rehashed and reupholstered, at the spring market last week, the most newsworthy collections explored what it means to be American.
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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | July 17, 2010
Beautiful interior spaces are products of time, thought and variety. Time, to acquire the right pieces and pull it all together, and thought, to determine what a space can be, how it should look, the mood it should evoke. Variety, though, is tough to get right. Warm, inviting, interesting décor often balances a mix of styles, colors, patterns, and textures to create those lived-in yet stylish spaces where all the elements "go with" each other but don't necessarily "match." Variety run amuck results in a mish-mash of elements that clash, which is why most homeowners not teamed-up with an interior designer turn to "room collections" presented by home furnishings catalogs and retailers.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 7, 1992
Tom Miller's furniture, now showing at Steven Scott, can be appreciated on a lot of levels, not the least of which is that it makes us happy.To be serious first -- let's eat our vegetables before we have dessert, so to speak -- there's the ecological level. Like other art furniture makers, Miller recycles old objects. Tables and chairs and cabinets and bookcases that you or I would overlook as totally unsuitable, Miller sees as color and pattern and statement and fun, and rescues them from oblivion to do double duty as utilitarian objects and works of art.There's also the African-American statement level.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 18, 2004
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Furniture retailers are bracing for sharp increases in the price of bedroom furniture, with the Commerce Department expected to impose duties today in reaction to alleged dumping by Chinese manufacturers. The move comes after months of lobbying by some U.S. furniture makers, who contend that the Chinese dumped $1.4 billion in wooden bedroom furniture in the United States in 2003. Retailers and other U.S. furniture makers who have manufacturing operations in China are opposed to duties.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | July 17, 2010
Beautiful interior spaces are products of time, thought and variety. Time, to acquire the right pieces and pull it all together, and thought, to determine what a space can be, how it should look, the mood it should evoke. Variety, though, is tough to get right. Warm, inviting, interesting décor often balances a mix of styles, colors, patterns, and textures to create those lived-in yet stylish spaces where all the elements "go with" each other but don't necessarily "match." Variety run amuck results in a mish-mash of elements that clash, which is why most homeowners not teamed-up with an interior designer turn to "room collections" presented by home furnishings catalogs and retailers.
FEATURES
By Charles W. Thurston and Charles W. Thurston,Journal of Commerce | July 7, 1991
Five years ago, Italian furniture exporters might not have worried that Mexico eventually would displace them as a principal supplier to the U.S. market.But now, just such fear has Canadian manufacturers shifting nervously in their seats.Their dread has been fueled by two and a half years of losses as a result of free trade with the United States, and their apprehension is heightened by the prospect of Mexico's inclusion in the proposed North American free trade pact."We're quite concerned about NAFTA [the proposed North American free trade agreement]
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | September 4, 2005
You may not care what Brad and Angelina are up to or when Katie and Tom will tie the knot. But these days, some furniture makers are banking on Hollywood nostalgia in the home for star quality. The Tinseltown of yesteryear sparkles in several furniture collections introduced last spring at the High Point Furniture Market in North Carolina. It's old-fashioned glamour, the kind that comes from films of the 1920s, '30s and '40s that show luxurious homes and suave actors like Humphrey Bogart and Cary Grant and alluring actresses like Lauren Bacall and Rita Hayworth.
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | July 12, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH now has another trade controversy on his hands. The Commerce Department has imposed stiff anti-dumping tariffs on $1.2 billion in imports of Chinese-made wooden bedroom furniture. Since China now plays the bad guy role once filled by Japan, most Americans won't be inclined to protest. They should. Like the steel tariffs of two years ago, these import taxes ranging from 4.9 percent to 198 percent are designed to preserve a few thousand jobs in a threatened industry. If they succeed, it will be because they have imperiled thousands of jobs in other industries and have soaked the purchasing power of mostly lower-income furniture buyers.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | October 1, 2006
FOR A GOOD CHUNK OF ITS 17-year history, the Mitchell Gold brand flew under the radar, despite the fact that it was quietly revolutionizing the furniture industry. The modern-looking chairs and sofas snapped up by customers of Crate & Barrel, Pottery Barn, Restoration Hardware, Williams-Sonoma Home and Storehouse had no hang tags to identify their provenance: a factory in Taylorsville, N.C., where they were made. What they share besides style is comfort in the spirit of "relaxed design," a philosophy co-founders Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams espoused from the beginning.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2005
Many people gaze upon piles of scrap wood and see kindling. Fritz Sterbak sees building blocks for bringing history to life. The Havre de Grace resident travels long distances - to Buffalo, N.Y., Philadelphia, Boston, Cincinnati - seeking castoff Victorian-era timber and carvings. He spends up to a year on scavenger hunts to antique shops, amassing wood that he uses to make re-creations of antique bars that are in demand as furnishings for businesses and upscale homes. "When I first started doing the bars I wasn't sure how well they would sell," Sterbak said.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | September 4, 2005
You may not care what Brad and Angelina are up to or when Katie and Tom will tie the knot. But these days, some furniture makers are banking on Hollywood nostalgia in the home for star quality. The Tinseltown of yesteryear sparkles in several furniture collections introduced last spring at the High Point Furniture Market in North Carolina. It's old-fashioned glamour, the kind that comes from films of the 1920s, '30s and '40s that show luxurious homes and suave actors like Humphrey Bogart and Cary Grant and alluring actresses like Lauren Bacall and Rita Hayworth.
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | July 12, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH now has another trade controversy on his hands. The Commerce Department has imposed stiff anti-dumping tariffs on $1.2 billion in imports of Chinese-made wooden bedroom furniture. Since China now plays the bad guy role once filled by Japan, most Americans won't be inclined to protest. They should. Like the steel tariffs of two years ago, these import taxes ranging from 4.9 percent to 198 percent are designed to preserve a few thousand jobs in a threatened industry. If they succeed, it will be because they have imperiled thousands of jobs in other industries and have soaked the purchasing power of mostly lower-income furniture buyers.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 18, 2004
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Furniture retailers are bracing for sharp increases in the price of bedroom furniture, with the Commerce Department expected to impose duties today in reaction to alleged dumping by Chinese manufacturers. The move comes after months of lobbying by some U.S. furniture makers, who contend that the Chinese dumped $1.4 billion in wooden bedroom furniture in the United States in 2003. Retailers and other U.S. furniture makers who have manufacturing operations in China are opposed to duties.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2002
Marie Corcoran Potthast, who preserved and researched the records of Potthast Brothers Inc., the former Baltimore furniture maker whose handmade reproductions were highly esteemed, died Tuesday of heart failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 92. Born Marie Corcoran in Baltimore, the youngest of five children of Irish immigrant parents from Galway, she was raised in the 1600 block of Wilkens Ave. and graduated in 1926 from St. Martin's Female Academy. In 1930, she married Theodore J. Potthast Sr. His father, John Potthast, and two uncles, William and Vincent, were German immigrants who established Potthast Brothers Inc. in 1892.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
David Klein, a well-known Baltimore artist who turned found materials into high-end pieces of furniture that captured the gritty eccentricity of his hometown, died of colon cancer June 6 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson. He was 71. "He was always in and around Baltimore. Everybody knew him. He was like Gertrude Stein. He had his studio and exhibits, and everybody always visited," said Anita Klein, his wife of 49 years. "He was a one-of-a-kind of Baltimore. " "His pieces, without question, are museum quality," said David Hayden, a close childhood friend and one of the largest collectors, along with his wife, JoAnn, of Mr. Klein's work.
FEATURES
By Linda Bennett and Linda Bennett,Contributing Writer | May 17, 1992
American consumers are going home again, seeking a safe haven from job worries, street crime and a frenzied lifestyle they're too busy to enjoy.Disillusioned by the excesses of the '80s, these aging boomers are trading in their fancy cars, designer suits and exotic restaurant meals for four-wheel drives, blue jeans and Mom's meatloaf.More than 65,000 furniture manufacturers, retailers, interior designers and media representatives attending the big semiannual International Home Furnishings Market in High Point, earlier last month, heard this lifestyle message again and again as they shopped for the furniture and decorative accessories you'll be seeing soon at local retail outlets.
TRAVEL
By Ellen Uzelac and By Ellen Uzelac,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
Most people know Gustav Stickley for his sturdy and straightforward furniture. But he was far more than a gifted woodworker whose creations fetch heady prices from collectors today. As one of the best-known spokesmen for the American Arts and Crafts movement a century ago, Stickley was a philosopher, publisher and social critic who championed a return to things simple -- what he called "a fine plainness" to the art of living. For Stickley fans -- and I'm one of them -- a visit to the Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms in Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, N.J., is an imperative this year.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2000
THE FURNITURE THAT Nick Mancuso makes is the amazing stuff cherished by royalty and museums. When Mancuso invites you into his parents' modest ranch home in Millers, he'll offer you a seat- on his Chippendale chair. Chippendale was the furniture maker in vogue on both sides of the Atlantic at the time of the American Revolution. Mancuso, 21, carved the chair a year ago while at the North Bennet Street School in Boston. The lion's claw feet, signature webbed medallion back, and softly scrolled top rail were researched and drawn full size before he carved into the mahogany with gouges and knives, in the technique of Chippendale.
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