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January 31, 2003
Baltimore author and illustrator Jonathon Scott Fuqua will discuss his books at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Towson library. Fuqua's works include Darby and, soon to be released, The Pygmy King. He received the Fiction Award from the Maryland State Arts Council in 1993, 1999 and last year. The Reappearance of Sam Webber won an Alex Award from Booklist Magazine and the American Library Association as one of the best books in 2000 for teen-agers. Fuqua's talk is sponsored by the Friends of the Towson Library and is free and open to the public.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 29, 2007
DURHAM, N.C. -- In the largest cheating scandal in the history of Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, 34 MBA students face serious penalties after university officials determined they collaborated on answers for an exam. Nine students face expulsion, said Mike Hemmerich, an associate dean at the business school. Fifteen will receive a one-year suspension from the school along with a failing grade in the course. Nine will get a failing grade in the course, and one student received a failing grade for the exam.
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NEWS
November 14, 1999
Gwendolyn Gordy Fuqua, 71, who helped her music mogul brother Berry Gordy Jr. form Motown Records, died of cancer Monday in San Diego. Mrs. Fuqua and her sister, Anna, led Motown's famous artist development department, where Mrs. Fuqua helped guide such Motown stars as the Supremes, Martha and the Vandellas, and the Temptations.Robert Kramer,60, an American movie director who devoted his career to capturing dissident movements from Vietnam war protesters to Latin American guerrillas, died Wednesday at Rouen Hospital in Normandy from meningitis, French news media reported.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2005
When local writer Jonathon Scott Fuqua lost a close friend to esophageal cancer in 2001, he dealt with his pain by penning a young-adult novel about a boy grappling with his father's imminent death from throat cancer. The book, The Willoughby Spit Wonder, was published in 2004 to rave reviews - only months before Fuqua found out that he, too, suffered from a throat ailment that was a precursor to the cancer that claimed his friend's life. As The Willoughby Spit Wonder hit bookstores, Fuqua was diagnosed with Barrett's Esophagus, a rare but preventable throat disease that can progress to cancer.
NEWS
By Heather L. Goddard and Heather L. Goddard,Sun Staff | March 28, 2004
Jonathon Scott Fuqua, an award-winning children's book author who lives in Baltimore, will discuss his new novel, The Willoughby Spit Wonder, Thursday at a fund-raiser for the Woman's Industrial Exchange. The Willoughby Spit Wonder (Candlewick Press, $15.99), Fuqua's third novel for young readers, is set in 1953 in the Chesapeake region of Virginia. Carter Johnson thinks if he swims across the entire bay through a hurricane, then maybe his dying father will be inspired to beat death as well.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1996
WASHINGTON -- After crying in its Alka-Seltzer for most of the 1990s, the aerospace industry enjoyed "a turnaround year" in 1996, a major trade association leader said yesterday.What's more, "the prospects for 1997 look even better," said Don Fuqua, president of the Aerospace Industries Association, during an annual year-end review and forecast luncheon at the Washington Hilton.Industry sales increased in 1996 for the first time in five years -- by 6 percent, to $112.4 billion, according to association figures.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2005
When local writer Jonathon Scott Fuqua lost a close friend to esophageal cancer in 2001, he dealt with his pain by penning a young-adult novel about a boy grappling with his father's imminent death from throat cancer. The book, The Willoughby Spit Wonder, was published in 2004 to rave reviews - only months before Fuqua found out that he, too, suffered from a throat ailment that was a precursor to the cancer that claimed his friend's life. As The Willoughby Spit Wonder hit bookstores, Fuqua was diagnosed with Barrett's Esophagus, a rare but preventable throat disease that can progress to cancer.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The aerospace industry reached a historic turning point this year, selling as much to commercial and foreign customers as to the U.S. government, a major trade association leader said yesterday."
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 29, 2007
DURHAM, N.C. -- In the largest cheating scandal in the history of Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, 34 MBA students face serious penalties after university officials determined they collaborated on answers for an exam. Nine students face expulsion, said Mike Hemmerich, an associate dean at the business school. Fifteen will receive a one-year suspension from the school along with a failing grade in the course. Nine will get a failing grade in the course, and one student received a failing grade for the exam.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | December 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The new year promises more of the same old gloom for the nation's defense and aerospace companies: more layoffs and lower sales "in every product category," the industry's top spokesman warned yesterday.In his annual speech looking ahead to the coming year, Donald Fuqua, president of the Aerospace Industries Association, told industry executives that the nation's producers of such things as commercial jet liners, fighter planes and radars are expected to eliminate another 47,000 jobs next year.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 11, 2005
White filmmakers - [Martin] Scorsese, Oliver Stone, Michael Mann - make films about all kinds of subjects," African-American filmmaker Antoine Fuqua told Variety's David Weddle two years ago. "They don't put themselves in a box. Why should we?"
BUSINESS
By Lorene Yue | October 10, 2004
Even people who are really good with money have bad days. Financial pros can fall deeply into credit-card debt or hang onto a bad investment longer than they should, just like the rest of us. Our four fallen angels know youM-Fre bound to trip up, too. The trick is not to brood but to bounce back as quickly as you can and look at the incident as a learning experience. M-fIf I finance it, I canM-Ft afford itM-F Suze Orman says the stupidest thing she has ever done was leasing a gold-colored BMW 735i for $800 a month in 1987 (thatM-Fs about $1,300 in todayM-Fs dollars)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 7, 2004
Hilariously, Touchstone Pictures has promoted King Arthur as a fresh tale, not a clone, and one or two smart publications have taken the bait. Still, it plays like a remake - not of Knights of the Round Table (1953) but of director Antoine Fuqua's previous Tears of the Sun (2003). To name the most pertinent similarities: A commando unit treks through war-torn territory on a perilous snatch-and-grab mission (in contemporary Nigeria there, antique northern Britain here). Its chief (Bruce Willis as a top Navy SEAL, Clive Owen as King Arthur)
FEATURES
July 5, 2004
As visitors descend on Baltimore during the summer tourism season, staff writer Larry Bingham offers an occasional look at how the city has been portrayed by writers over the years. Today, an excerpt from local author Jonathon Scott Fuqua's 1998 young-adult novel The Reappearance of Sam Webber. In the story, the 11-year-old protagonist has moved from Rodgers Forge to Charles Village. "I looked around at the ground, at Ditch's torn-up work boots, splats of white paint across the toes. `There's a 7-Eleven near here?
NEWS
By Heather L. Goddard and Heather L. Goddard,Sun Staff | March 28, 2004
Jonathon Scott Fuqua, an award-winning children's book author who lives in Baltimore, will discuss his new novel, The Willoughby Spit Wonder, Thursday at a fund-raiser for the Woman's Industrial Exchange. The Willoughby Spit Wonder (Candlewick Press, $15.99), Fuqua's third novel for young readers, is set in 1953 in the Chesapeake region of Virginia. Carter Johnson thinks if he swims across the entire bay through a hurricane, then maybe his dying father will be inspired to beat death as well.
NEWS
January 31, 2003
Baltimore author and illustrator Jonathon Scott Fuqua will discuss his books at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Towson library. Fuqua's works include Darby and, soon to be released, The Pygmy King. He received the Fiction Award from the Maryland State Arts Council in 1993, 1999 and last year. The Reappearance of Sam Webber won an Alex Award from Booklist Magazine and the American Library Association as one of the best books in 2000 for teen-agers. Fuqua's talk is sponsored by the Friends of the Towson Library and is free and open to the public.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 13, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Donald Fuqua, president of the Aerospace Industries Association, projected a "less than rosy" outlook in the year ahead for the nation's major defense and aerospace contractors but stressed that the picture is "not as dismal as some have painted it."Speaking at the trade group's annual year-end review and forecast lunch at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, Mr. Fuqua said the final 1990 figures are expected to show a 5 percent decline in the number of aerospace and defense workers. This translates into a loss of 69,000 jobs.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 11, 2005
White filmmakers - [Martin] Scorsese, Oliver Stone, Michael Mann - make films about all kinds of subjects," African-American filmmaker Antoine Fuqua told Variety's David Weddle two years ago. "They don't put themselves in a box. Why should we?"
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2002
The central character in Jonathon Scott Fuqua's new book, Darby (Candlewick, $15.99), emerged from the fertile and tormented land of rural South Carolina. Like the protagonist in his first book, The Reappearance of Sam Webber, Darby Carmichael learns a lot about who she is through the prism of race. She's a spunky 9-year-old who lives on a farm in Marlboro County, circa 1926. Her best friend, Evette, the precocious daughter of a black tenant farmer, understands the social limits of their relationship better than Darby.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
TORONTO -- "I've been blessed," Denzel Washington says during the recent Toronto International Film Festival. "I'm in a great position. I make tons of money." There's a "but" there, and we'll get to that. It might be instructive to first give context to Washington's role in Training Day, which had its premiere at the festival and opens in theaters on Oct. 5. The man who won an Academy Award in 1989 for his soldier in Glory, who imbued righteous indignation with sweat and muscle in The Hurricane and who rallied his divided team in Remember the Titans is taking a turn toward evil.
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