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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2001
"Funny Girl" will be forever famous in the history of the Broadway stage as the show that made Barbra Streisand a star. The musical, though, tells the story of another star: Fanny Brice, the plain-looking Jewish girl from New York's Lower East Side who became a show business phenomenon in the days of vaudeville, radio and the Ziegfeld Follies. Although Brice's inimitable characters, such as "Baby Snooks," brought her wealth and fame, they didn't buy happiness. Her marriage to handsome gambler Nick Arnstein went bad when his shady business dealings shook their relationship to the core.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to the season finale of "Glee. " In the opening scene, we find Brittany at MIT...yes, that MIT, where apparently she's some kind of genius. She wrote a bunch of numbers on the back of her math test. It's some kind of mathematical type stuff I don't understand, which will hereby be known as The Brittany Code aka "the most important scientific breakthrough of the 21st century. " And she may be the most brilliant scientific mind since Einstein...say whaaat?
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NEWS
February 19, 1998
Bob Merrill, 77, a prolific composer and lyricist famous for Broadway musicals including "Funny Girl" and "Carnival," fatally shot himself after a long illness, his publicist and Daily Variety said yesterday.Pub Date: 2/19/98
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2011
Ben Vereen didn't miss his calling. He was born to be an actor, singer and dancer, and he has enjoyed considerable success in the entertainment business for at least 40 years. But it seems that he would have been just as well cut out for an entirely different career — motivational speaker. "A lot of my friends are not here, but I'm still here," Vereen said by phone from Los Angeles, the words coming in rapid-fire fashion. "I lost a daughter. I got hit by a car and was pronounced dead.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 16, 1996
"Ain't Misbehavin'," starring Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, will highlight Performing Arts Productions' 1996-1997 season at the Lyric Opera House.The five-play lineup will include three other revivals of musical classics -- "West Side Story," "Funny Girl" and "Singin' in the Rain" -- as well as Rob Becker's one-man comedy show, "Defending the Caveman."In addition, subscribers will have an option to add the return engagement of "Stomp," which sold out at the Lyric earlier this season and received national recognition for its percussive performance at last month's Academy Awards show.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 14, 2001
When producer Ray Stark proposed that Barbra Streisand re-create her role as singer-comedienne Fanny Brice for the 1968 movie version of the Broadway smash Funny Girl, Columbia Pictures executives counter-proposed Shirley MacLaine because they felt Streisand was "too Jewish." Stark, Brice's real-life son-in-law, stood his ground. Later, when director William Wyler cast Omar Sharif as her husband, Nicky Arnstein, the actor found himself a figure of controversy in his native land, Egypt, for romancing a Jewish star playing a Jewish star so soon after Israel's victory in the Six-Day War. These ethnic and political sideshows are worth remembering on the occasion of the film's deluxe reissue at the Senator - not because the Middle East has become so searingly topical again, but because this is the kind of conflict big-time American showbiz always, eventually, manages to transcend.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 1998
Dolly Levi, the irrepressible matchmaker and jack-of-all-trades whose story is told in "Hello, Dolly" kept fast company back in the 1960s.In those days, the musical was a Broadway megahit along with "Fiddler on the Roof," "Mame" and "Funny Girl." Alas, while "Funny Girl" became the blockbuster film that launched Streisand, "Mame" was snapped up by amateur theater groups everywhere and "Fiddler" entered the Broadway pantheon, "Dolly" didn't quite keep up.But even though the show doesn't have the star appeal it did when New York audiences were queuing up on 44th Street, there's no doubt that a properly cast "Dolly" can still make a room sway and a band play with the best of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to the season finale of "Glee. " In the opening scene, we find Brittany at MIT...yes, that MIT, where apparently she's some kind of genius. She wrote a bunch of numbers on the back of her math test. It's some kind of mathematical type stuff I don't understand, which will hereby be known as The Brittany Code aka "the most important scientific breakthrough of the 21st century. " And she may be the most brilliant scientific mind since Einstein...say whaaat?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2011
Ben Vereen didn't miss his calling. He was born to be an actor, singer and dancer, and he has enjoyed considerable success in the entertainment business for at least 40 years. But it seems that he would have been just as well cut out for an entirely different career — motivational speaker. "A lot of my friends are not here, but I'm still here," Vereen said by phone from Los Angeles, the words coming in rapid-fire fashion. "I lost a daughter. I got hit by a car and was pronounced dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SITH and TIM SITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 4, 2005
Forty years ago, a force of nature struck unsuspecting TV screens across the country, very subtly at first - an off-camera, almost girlish voice softly singing a brief, angular melody that ended with four simple words: "My name is Barbra." Although a certifiable star - she had already made the cover of Time and Life, garnered two Grammys and conquered Broadway in Funny Girl - Barbra Streisand stepped all the way into the brightest, widest limelight once anointed by network television with her own special.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SITH and TIM SITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 4, 2005
Forty years ago, a force of nature struck unsuspecting TV screens across the country, very subtly at first - an off-camera, almost girlish voice softly singing a brief, angular melody that ended with four simple words: "My name is Barbra." Although a certifiable star - she had already made the cover of Time and Life, garnered two Grammys and conquered Broadway in Funny Girl - Barbra Streisand stepped all the way into the brightest, widest limelight once anointed by network television with her own special.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 14, 2001
When producer Ray Stark proposed that Barbra Streisand re-create her role as singer-comedienne Fanny Brice for the 1968 movie version of the Broadway smash Funny Girl, Columbia Pictures executives counter-proposed Shirley MacLaine because they felt Streisand was "too Jewish." Stark, Brice's real-life son-in-law, stood his ground. Later, when director William Wyler cast Omar Sharif as her husband, Nicky Arnstein, the actor found himself a figure of controversy in his native land, Egypt, for romancing a Jewish star playing a Jewish star so soon after Israel's victory in the Six-Day War. These ethnic and political sideshows are worth remembering on the occasion of the film's deluxe reissue at the Senator - not because the Middle East has become so searingly topical again, but because this is the kind of conflict big-time American showbiz always, eventually, manages to transcend.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2001
"Funny Girl" will be forever famous in the history of the Broadway stage as the show that made Barbra Streisand a star. The musical, though, tells the story of another star: Fanny Brice, the plain-looking Jewish girl from New York's Lower East Side who became a show business phenomenon in the days of vaudeville, radio and the Ziegfeld Follies. Although Brice's inimitable characters, such as "Baby Snooks," brought her wealth and fame, they didn't buy happiness. Her marriage to handsome gambler Nick Arnstein went bad when his shady business dealings shook their relationship to the core.
NEWS
February 19, 1998
Bob Merrill, 77, a prolific composer and lyricist famous for Broadway musicals including "Funny Girl" and "Carnival," fatally shot himself after a long illness, his publicist and Daily Variety said yesterday.Pub Date: 2/19/98
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 1998
Dolly Levi, the irrepressible matchmaker and jack-of-all-trades whose story is told in "Hello, Dolly" kept fast company back in the 1960s.In those days, the musical was a Broadway megahit along with "Fiddler on the Roof," "Mame" and "Funny Girl." Alas, while "Funny Girl" became the blockbuster film that launched Streisand, "Mame" was snapped up by amateur theater groups everywhere and "Fiddler" entered the Broadway pantheon, "Dolly" didn't quite keep up.But even though the show doesn't have the star appeal it did when New York audiences were queuing up on 44th Street, there's no doubt that a properly cast "Dolly" can still make a room sway and a band play with the best of them.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
NEW YORK -- When Marvin Hamlisch steps onto the podium today for his debut as the principal pops conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, many of the elements of theater will be present.There will be dimmed lights. A romantic theme. Punch lines. Dramatic tension. Staging. Catchy music.And a star, of course: The conductor himself.All of which is part of the plan."My background is in music, but in the theater. So these programs have some theatrical basis. I'll be playing the piano and speaking.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
NEW YORK -- When Marvin Hamlisch steps onto the podium today for his debut as the principal pops conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, many of the elements of theater will be present.There will be dimmed lights. A romantic theme. Punch lines. Dramatic tension. Staging. Catchy music.And a star, of course: The conductor himself.All of which is part of the plan."My background is in music, but in the theater. So these programs have some theatrical basis. I'll be playing the piano and speaking.
NEWS
August 21, 1994
* Wendell James Franklin, 78, who worked his way from parking cars in the NBC lot to guiding such talents as Bill Cosby, died of cancer July 22 in Los Angeles. Franklin, who became the first black member of the Directors Guild of America in 1960, was stage manager for live television shows including "The Jerry Lewis Show," "The Nat King Cole Show" and "This Is Your Life." also helped direct "McMillan and Wife," "Green Hornet" and the 1969-71 "Bill Cosby Show." He was assistant director on "The Greatest Story Ever Told" and "Funny Girl."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 16, 1996
"Ain't Misbehavin'," starring Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, will highlight Performing Arts Productions' 1996-1997 season at the Lyric Opera House.The five-play lineup will include three other revivals of musical classics -- "West Side Story," "Funny Girl" and "Singin' in the Rain" -- as well as Rob Becker's one-man comedy show, "Defending the Caveman."In addition, subscribers will have an option to add the return engagement of "Stomp," which sold out at the Lyric earlier this season and received national recognition for its percussive performance at last month's Academy Awards show.
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