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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The six guys who make up the Baltimore-based comedy troupe Color Me Funny have a pretty simple goal in life. They never want to hear the following crack ever again: "The best and worst compliment you can get is that you're the funniest person In Baltimore. " "Yeah, I've heard that before," says Joe Greenway, who along with his five buds is striving to make such put-downs obsolete. "But what we're doing proves that Baltimore can be a thriving comedy scene. " And just how are they trying to prove that?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The six guys who make up the Baltimore-based comedy troupe Color Me Funny have a pretty simple goal in life. They never want to hear the following crack ever again: "The best and worst compliment you can get is that you're the funniest person In Baltimore. " "Yeah, I've heard that before," says Joe Greenway, who along with his five buds is striving to make such put-downs obsolete. "But what we're doing proves that Baltimore can be a thriving comedy scene. " And just how are they trying to prove that?
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 11, 1999
Nakedly political advice to senators: Cast each vote as if it were your last.Senators took a big risk debating in secret. The public might demand this be continued in perpetuity.Should the Senate vote wrong, Starr might investigate it. Funny business goes on in the cloakroom, so they say.If you cannot even believe in the Olympics, what is there left?Pub Date: 2/11/99
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dustin Levy, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Four days a week, Aisha Tyler works as co-host of "The Talk" on CBS Daytime. Every other week, she steps up to the microphone to voice the character of Lana Kane in the animated show "Archer. " And on the weekends, she hops on a plane to perform her stand-up show (she's at the Baltimore Comedy Factory this weekend), or perhaps make an appearance at a Comic-Con. Somewhere in there, she also finds time for her podcast," Girl on Guy," and to host the new version of "Whose Line is it Anyway?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
This Sunday and Super Bowl at Amiccis, they'll give you an entree to-go when you order an entree from the menu. Then you won't have to worry about making dinner on Monday. The entree choices are chicken parmigiana with fettucine, penne Amicci, linguine with meat sauce, veggie gnocchi or rigatoni Bolognese, those kinds of things. Bring this with you , and no funny business. The offer is good in the dining room at Amiccis only. No sharing, no substitutions, that kind of thing.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1997
Pricey moderation: Despite economists' concerns, inflation has been moderate for some time -- even for some of the pricier things in life. The people who make Moet & Chandon champagne looked at the cost of several high-priced items and found they were generally stable in 1996. A pound of Teuscher chocolate truffles was $49, the same as in 1995. A Rolex watch that cost $15,900 in 1995 remained at that price.No funny business: If potential customers and clients don't leave messages on your answering machine, maybe it's because you don't sound so hot. That's the suggestion of Home Office Computing magazine, which says to forget trying to be funny or cute, unless it fits the image you're trying to project.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
If you are elected by the people and you are caught stealing anything in relation to that job you are entrusted with, you should go and lose your pension to boot! ("Alston must go," Oct. 13.) It amazes me that Del. Tiffany Alston can be so nervy to even suggest she might run again. It makes me think this woman was not raised right. For her to have such blatant gall is overwhelming! Please, citizens of Maryland, call, write, email, text or Twitter your elected officials and demand a law go on the books stating that any funny business financially involving their elected positions will be an automatic loss of their job and pension - and none of this admission of guilt or plea bargaining stuff, just out, end of story.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 1997
MOSCOW -- The Zotov family is reduced by new, post-Communist poverty to taking in washing to make ends meet. The brainless eldest son, Albert, invites a high-priced interior decorator to design a high-concept laundry for them.In walks a New Russian fop in white tie and tails, spewing English and French words and grandiose decorating schemes. He clashes instantly with the aging grandfather, an old Communist and veteran of many Soviet wars, who mistakes the title of designer for a Jewish surname.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | January 12, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- Ellen Sauerbrey's legal assault on the gubernatorial election she so narrowly lost may in the long run have positive consequences for Maryland, but at the moment its main product seems to be embarrassment. There's plenty of that to go around.Those concerned with the public image of the state are embarrassed, because once again Maryland's lurid politics make resemble places it would much prefer to look down on.Backers of Mrs. Sauerbrey are embarrassed too, because thus far she doesn't appear able to substantiate fully her assertion that the election was stolen from her by old-fashioned funny business in a few city precincts.
FEATURES
June 29, 1998
Beginning today, "Dilbert" has a new neighbor on The Sun's comics pages -- "Non Sequitur" by Wiley (a.k.a. Wiley Miller). It replaces "Tommy," which was discontinued by its syndicate. The new strip takes simple ideas and views them with an off-kilter sensibility.Wiley, who lives in Iowa, developed that perspective during 15 years in editorial cartooning for such publications as Playboy, the Saturday Evening Post and the San Francisco Examiner. He quit satirizing the political world when the competition got too tough: The politicians, he found, had become their own comics.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
If you are elected by the people and you are caught stealing anything in relation to that job you are entrusted with, you should go and lose your pension to boot! ("Alston must go," Oct. 13.) It amazes me that Del. Tiffany Alston can be so nervy to even suggest she might run again. It makes me think this woman was not raised right. For her to have such blatant gall is overwhelming! Please, citizens of Maryland, call, write, email, text or Twitter your elected officials and demand a law go on the books stating that any funny business financially involving their elected positions will be an automatic loss of their job and pension - and none of this admission of guilt or plea bargaining stuff, just out, end of story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
This Sunday and Super Bowl at Amiccis, they'll give you an entree to-go when you order an entree from the menu. Then you won't have to worry about making dinner on Monday. The entree choices are chicken parmigiana with fettucine, penne Amicci, linguine with meat sauce, veggie gnocchi or rigatoni Bolognese, those kinds of things. Bring this with you , and no funny business. The offer is good in the dining room at Amiccis only. No sharing, no substitutions, that kind of thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | March 26, 2009
It's funny, if you'll excuse the expression, but Shad Kunkle didn't move to Chicago to pursue a career in comedy. Living in his parents' basement and working a dead-end job in Fairfield, Iowa, he felt trapped and decided to get out. "There's only three jobs in Iowa: You can do farming, insurance or selling insurance to the farmers," Kunkle said. So he moved to Chicago, aiming to become an actor, but after taking note of the city's vibrant improvisational comedy scene, on a whim, he decided to give it a go. Now, Kunkle performs with the touring cast of the renowned comedy troupe The Second City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
It's one thing for a stand-up comedian to thank an audience for their positive reception, but shelling out thousands of dollars as a token of appreciation (or as an apology) is another. In the midst of the 100-city "It's Pimpin' Pimpin" U.S. tour that will stop at 1st Mariner Arena tonight, comedian Katt Williams is no stranger to either situation. In February, Williams, 34, handed out $100 bills to audience members to thank them for their loyalty and support after he performed at Hollywood's Laugh Factory.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | May 18, 2003
THIS IS about as good as it gets in the horse racing game: a Kentucky Derby winner taking the lead in the far turn and breaking off a stunning stretch run to notch an undeniable 9 3/4 -length victory in the Preakness. For Funny Cide and his soon-to-be even more famous camp, it was so good, nothing could steal this horse's thunder. That's saying something, considering what Funny Cide and Co. have been through. One week ago, an irresponsible little journalistic exercise by The Miami Herald unleashed perhaps the silliest, potentially greatest-damaging and most-unproductive 36 hours in racing history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID FOLKENFLIK and DAVID FOLKENFLIK,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | September 22, 2002
LOS ANGELES -- On the ground floor of a shuttered health clinic several miles north of Hollywood, Zach Braff -- John "J.D." Dorian on NBC's hospital comedy Scrubs -- is spending an alarming amount of time deciding whether it would be funny to wear a "onesie" in a scene set in his bedroom. As an extra mills about wearing sneakers with foot-high soles (so he can stand in for a taller actor), Braff is discovering that, funny or not, the oversized pajamas are wildly uncomfortable. "I'm not accustomed to being interrupted," he says archly, pretending to admonish a staffer -- and poking fun at his status as the first among equals on the ensemble show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dustin Levy, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
Four days a week, Aisha Tyler works as co-host of "The Talk" on CBS Daytime. Every other week, she steps up to the microphone to voice the character of Lana Kane in the animated show "Archer. " And on the weekends, she hops on a plane to perform her stand-up show (she's at the Baltimore Comedy Factory this weekend), or perhaps make an appearance at a Comic-Con. Somewhere in there, she also finds time for her podcast," Girl on Guy," and to host the new version of "Whose Line is it Anyway?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | April 17, 2008
It's one thing for a stand-up comedian to thank an audience for their positive reception, but shelling out thousands of dollars as a token of appreciation (or as an apology) is another. In the midst of the 100-city "It's Pimpin' Pimpin" U.S. tour that will stop at 1st Mariner Arena tonight, comedian Katt Williams is no stranger to either situation. In February, Williams, 34, handed out $100 bills to audience members to thank them for their loyalty and support after he performed at Hollywood's Laugh Factory.
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