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By Rashod D. Ollison | October 7, 2004
Jay-Z and R. Kelly / 1st Mariner and MCI Center If you thought Jay-Z would fade away after announcing his retirement and that R. Kelly would sit still and cool it after recent scandals, think again. The two urban titans stop at 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St., Friday night at 8. Tickets are $35 -$100 and are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or by visiting www.ticketmaster.com. In addition, the pair stops by the MCI Center (Sixth and G streets Northwest, D.C.)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2011
"I'm having a little difficulty absorbing the news I just got," said Martha Reeves, after hearing that Gladys Horton, the original lead singer of the Marvelettes, had died at 66 in a California nursing home. Though she hadn't spoken with Horton in 30 years — she had stayed in Detroit, while Horton moved to California — news of her death hit Reeves hard. Without the Marvelettes, Martha and the Vandellas would not have been. "They were our pioneers," she said. In recent years, many of Motown's stars have died.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter M. Nichols and Peter M. Nichols,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 2003
Acouple of days ago, the Funk Brothers were on a bus outside Pittsburgh, about to head to a gig in Toronto. "We're loading up some Diet Pepsi, but it should be Diet Coke," joked the percussionist Jack Ashford by cell phone. In Paul Justman's documentary Standing in the Shadows of Motown, now available in a DVD special edition from Artisan, the brothers travel by station wagon. Justman's film dramatizes those early tours by the now recognized but then unknown (and unrelated) group of studio jazz and R&B artists who laid down the extraordinary rhythm for Motown stars like Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross and the Supremes and the Temptations.
NEWS
February 5, 2007
Joe Hunter, 79 Motown bandleader Joe Hunter, a three-time Grammy winner with the Funk Brothers, died Friday in Detroit. The first hire of Motown legend Berry Gordy Jr., he backed up acts such as Smokey Robinson and the Miracles on piano in the late 1950s. Mr. Hunter also served as Motown's first bandleader in the early days. The Funk Brothers - celebrated in the 2002 documentary film Standing in the Shadows of Motown - played backup on many Motown recordings. Mr. Hunter's piano work was an integral part of such songs as Martha and the Vandellas' "Heat Wave" and Marvin Gaye's "Pride and Joy."
NEWS
February 5, 2007
Joe Hunter, 79 Motown bandleader Joe Hunter, a three-time Grammy winner with the Funk Brothers, died Friday in Detroit. The first hire of Motown legend Berry Gordy Jr., he backed up acts such as Smokey Robinson and the Miracles on piano in the late 1950s. Mr. Hunter also served as Motown's first bandleader in the early days. The Funk Brothers - celebrated in the 2002 documentary film Standing in the Shadows of Motown - played backup on many Motown recordings. Mr. Hunter's piano work was an integral part of such songs as Martha and the Vandellas' "Heat Wave" and Marvin Gaye's "Pride and Joy."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 27, 2002
SUN SCORE ***1/2 The Funk Brothers are among the most successful musicians of all time. They've played together on more hits than the Beatles, Rolling Stones and Elvis Presley combined. And practically no one knows who they are. Standing in the Shadows of Motown is an attempt to change that, to give a group of musicians now in the twilight of their lives - the guys who invented and wove together the sound of such rock and roll classics as "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," "For Once in My Life," "My Girl" and "Dancing in the Streets" - a taste of the spotlight they've so long deserved.
NEWS
November 13, 2002
Johnny Griffith, 66, a keyboard player with the Funk Brothers, the highly skilled group of Detroit studio musicians who helped create and define the legendary Motown sound, died of a heart attack Sunday at a Detroit hospital. His death occurred hours before the local premiere of Standing in the Shadows of Motown, a documentary film that gives belated recognition to the anonymous studio band that furnished much of the instrumental sound for Motown. A racially integrated collective of about a dozen top jazz and R&B musicians in Detroit who worked at Motown from 1959 to 1972, the Funk Brothers provided the background music for greats including Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Smokey Robinson, the Temptations, the Four Tops and Stevie Wonder.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 15, 2002
The Maltese Falcon returns to the Charles' Saturday revival series at noon tomorrow. For a $5 ticket, you get both towering entertainment and a 100-minute film course. The writer-director, John Huston, follows Dashiell Hammett's novel almost to the letter, but he heightens the greed of the characters until they become satiric, and he adds a magical curtain line - Bogey looking at the worthless title bird and calling it "The stuff dreams are made of." That line is a grace note the movie needs: an acknowledgment that no matter how ruthless Hammett's characters are, they aren't that different from the rest of us - in their minds they pursue divine fancies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2011
"I'm having a little difficulty absorbing the news I just got," said Martha Reeves, after hearing that Gladys Horton, the original lead singer of the Marvelettes, had died at 66 in a California nursing home. Though she hadn't spoken with Horton in 30 years — she had stayed in Detroit, while Horton moved to California — news of her death hit Reeves hard. Without the Marvelettes, Martha and the Vandellas would not have been. "They were our pioneers," she said. In recent years, many of Motown's stars have died.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
The Brothers Johnson are back in the groove. After 18 years apart, the R&B and disco act that put 15 hits in the top 40 during the days of the 8-track tape is back on the road. The Brothers Johnson - guitarist/vocalist George Johnson and bassist/vocalist Louis Johnson - put the funk in the faces at the Ram's Head Tavern in Annapolis for two shows on Wednesday night. With late-'70s songs like "Strawberry Letter 23," "Stomp," "I'll Be Good to You" and "Get the Funk Out of My Face" up their once-polyester sleeves, be prepared for a flashback.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | October 7, 2004
Jay-Z and R. Kelly / 1st Mariner and MCI Center If you thought Jay-Z would fade away after announcing his retirement and that R. Kelly would sit still and cool it after recent scandals, think again. The two urban titans stop at 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St., Friday night at 8. Tickets are $35 -$100 and are available through Ticketmaster by calling 410-547-SEAT or by visiting www.ticketmaster.com. In addition, the pair stops by the MCI Center (Sixth and G streets Northwest, D.C.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter M. Nichols and Peter M. Nichols,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 2003
Acouple of days ago, the Funk Brothers were on a bus outside Pittsburgh, about to head to a gig in Toronto. "We're loading up some Diet Pepsi, but it should be Diet Coke," joked the percussionist Jack Ashford by cell phone. In Paul Justman's documentary Standing in the Shadows of Motown, now available in a DVD special edition from Artisan, the brothers travel by station wagon. Justman's film dramatizes those early tours by the now recognized but then unknown (and unrelated) group of studio jazz and R&B artists who laid down the extraordinary rhythm for Motown stars like Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Diana Ross and the Supremes and the Temptations.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 27, 2002
SUN SCORE ***1/2 The Funk Brothers are among the most successful musicians of all time. They've played together on more hits than the Beatles, Rolling Stones and Elvis Presley combined. And practically no one knows who they are. Standing in the Shadows of Motown is an attempt to change that, to give a group of musicians now in the twilight of their lives - the guys who invented and wove together the sound of such rock and roll classics as "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," "For Once in My Life," "My Girl" and "Dancing in the Streets" - a taste of the spotlight they've so long deserved.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 15, 2002
The Maltese Falcon returns to the Charles' Saturday revival series at noon tomorrow. For a $5 ticket, you get both towering entertainment and a 100-minute film course. The writer-director, John Huston, follows Dashiell Hammett's novel almost to the letter, but he heightens the greed of the characters until they become satiric, and he adds a magical curtain line - Bogey looking at the worthless title bird and calling it "The stuff dreams are made of." That line is a grace note the movie needs: an acknowledgment that no matter how ruthless Hammett's characters are, they aren't that different from the rest of us - in their minds they pursue divine fancies.
NEWS
November 13, 2002
Johnny Griffith, 66, a keyboard player with the Funk Brothers, the highly skilled group of Detroit studio musicians who helped create and define the legendary Motown sound, died of a heart attack Sunday at a Detroit hospital. His death occurred hours before the local premiere of Standing in the Shadows of Motown, a documentary film that gives belated recognition to the anonymous studio band that furnished much of the instrumental sound for Motown. A racially integrated collective of about a dozen top jazz and R&B musicians in Detroit who worked at Motown from 1959 to 1972, the Funk Brothers provided the background music for greats including Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Smokey Robinson, the Temptations, the Four Tops and Stevie Wonder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
The Brothers Johnson are back in the groove. After 18 years apart, the R&B and disco act that put 15 hits in the top 40 during the days of the 8-track tape is back on the road. The Brothers Johnson - guitarist/vocalist George Johnson and bassist/vocalist Louis Johnson - put the funk in the faces at the Ram's Head Tavern in Annapolis for two shows on Wednesday night. With late-'70s songs like "Strawberry Letter 23," "Stomp," "I'll Be Good to You" and "Get the Funk Out of My Face" up their once-polyester sleeves, be prepared for a flashback.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2004
An update on the concert scene: newly announced shows and ticket availability. For ticket information and purchase, call Ticketmaster at 410-547-SEAT unless otherwise noted. Just announced "A Smooth Jazz Christmas," starring Vanessa Williams, will be held on Dec. 11 at the Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore. m.o.e. performs at Constitution Hall in Washington on Oct. 29. Also, the Pixies are there on Dec. 7 and 8. Still available R. Kelly and Jay-Z at 1st Mariner Arena on Oct. 8. The Funk Brothers at the Gordon Center for Performing Arts in Owings Mills on Oct. 9. 410-356-7469.
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