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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Elizabeth L. "Bobbi" Phillips, who co-founded and operated a West Baltimore funeral home, died of congestive heart failure Dec. 28 at her home. She was 93. Born Elizabeth Lattimore in Baltimore and raised on Schroeder Street, she was a 1936 Frederick Douglass High School graduate. She earned a diploma at the old Cortez Peters Business School on Eutaw Place. She also attended the University of Maryland, College Park and Morgan State University. "She was a woman of amazing fortitude, natural beauty, dignity, strong character, modesty, unrelenting strength and quietness, and calmness of spirit," said Doretha "Dottie" Hector, a co-owner of the funeral business, who worked closely with her for the past 30 years and now runs the business.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | December 6, 2013
Many consumers these days are pretty savvy about comparison shopping for goods and services. But they might not know that they have certain rights when it comes to buying funeral services. The Federal Trade Commission sent out a reminder this week, after suing an Alabama funeral home for failing to provide pricing information as required. Consumers are entitled to only buy the goods or services they want when it comes to funeral planning.  According to the FTC, consumers should receive an itemized price list when they go into a funeral home to arrange a service.
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EXPLORE
December 4, 2012
Daniel Simons, managing partner of Hubbard Funeral Home, and his wife Heather will pick up 30 Christmas trees in North Carolina to give to the families of deployed Maryland National Guard veterans, in honor of their service. The Maryland National Guard Teen Council will help load the trees on the recipients' vehicles Dec. 8. A visit from Santa is expected and light refreshments will be served at the Wilkens Avenue funeral home.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman | December 3, 2013
A special exception has been granted by Baltimore County to enable Catonsville businessman Craig Witzke to move forward on plans to convert the historic Candle Light Inn on Frederick Road into a funeral home. Administrative Law Judge John Beverungen ruled Nov. 25, granting a special exception to allow a funeral establishment in a residential zone, and a variance on setbacks for the current building, a new garage and parking spaces. In granting the special exception, the judge cited a previous case which allowed a funeral home in a residential zone as an appropriate use. He said this case meets the requirements for a variance - that the property is unique and that denial of a variance would cause hardship for the petitioner.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman | December 3, 2013
A special exception has been granted by Baltimore County to enable Catonsville businessman Craig Witzke to move forward on plans to convert the historic Candle Light Inn on Frederick Road into a funeral home. Administrative Law Judge John Beverungen ruled Nov. 25, granting a special exception to allow a funeral establishment in a residential zone, and a variance on setbacks for the current building, a new garage and parking spaces. In granting the special exception, the judge cited a previous case which allowed a funeral home in a residential zone as an appropriate use. He said this case meets the requirements for a variance - that the property is unique and that denial of a variance would cause hardship for the petitioner.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | July 30, 1992
Little will change at a 40-year-old community cemetery in Annapolis and at the city's oldest, family-run funeral home -- though both will get cosmetic face lifts nnow that a national chain has entered the picture, company officials say.Stewart Enterprises Inc., the funeral industry's third largest company, has bought Hillcrest Memorial Gardens on Forest Drive for an undisclosed amount. The publicly traded company from New Orleans announced plans last month to purchase Hillcrest and, in a separate transaction, two larger Baltimore cemeteries.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
THEY SAY THAT EACH generation builds upon the foundations laid by those who came before. The Haight family of Sykesville has been doing just that since 1888, both literally and figuratively for five generations.In 1888, James Randolph Weer opened a funeral home on Spout Hill Road in Sykesville and moved the business to the town's Main Street after his son, C. Harry Weer, joined him at the turn of the century. When James retired in 1932, Luther Haight began working at the funeral home and the Weer-Haight partnership was formed in 1951.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1994
Three short films you're pretty much guaranteed not to be seeing on network TV or at the local multiplex anytime soon:* "It Came From the Backyard," a six-minute horror short, made on an $8.75 budget, described -- with some pride -- using terms not printable in a family newspaper.* "Psychedelic Glue-Sniffing Hillbillies." If the title isn't enough, here's how the film's creator describes it: "It's about American Culture."* "Title 17," a three-minute film, featuring hundreds of FBI warnings against copying videotapes, that raises -- in its creator's own words -- the question, "If it's illegal to copy a videotape, is it illegal to copy the warning that says it's illegal to copy the tape?"
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1997
Edward James Weber, a second-generation funeral director PTC who tried to enhance the image of morticians and get families more involved in the services of loved ones, died Wednesday of diabetes at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 71.A lifelong Baltimore resident, Mr. Weber had been a mortician since 1952 and believed that relatives should talk and share good memories when someone dies, not just mourn their loss."He'd get the family looking at pictures and making collages," said his daughter-in-law, Kathleen A. Weber of Perry Hall.
NEWS
March 14, 2006
Herbert E. Nutter, a former Baltimore funeral director, died of a heart attack March 7 at Northwest Hospital Center. The Windsor Mill resident was 76. Mr. Nutter was born in Baltimore and raised on Druid Hill Avenue. As a youngster, he began running errands for Helen A. Holland, who was the owner of the George H. Holland Funeral Home. Before his 1948 graduation from Douglass High School, Mr. Nutter studied embalming at Mrs. Holland's establishment and later was certified as a mortician.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 27, 2013
The emotional component of the crises that occur in the city all too often winds up in a North Avenue grief counseling room. This destination for some needed healing is little known in the world of Baltimore philanthropic circles. But that will be changing. I spent time this week at Roberta's House, a comfort zone located in the heart of the neighborhoods where these sadnesses often begin. I spoke with Annette March-Grier, who named her project after her late mother, Roberta March, who was known as a loving matriarch among Baltimore's African-American morticians.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2013
Baltimore author Sheri Booker sees dead people. In her mind's eye, she can clearly remember the 600-pound man whose corpse had to be hoisted by a crane out of his apartment window, the teenage suicide victim who tattooed instructions about his funeral arrangements onto his arm, and the thug whose death incited a brawl that erupted at his viewing and continued into the street. Booker, who now is 31, began working at the Wylie Funeral Home in West Baltimore in 1997 at age 15, partly as a way of coping with her grief over the death of a beloved aunt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
It was standing room only Thursday as family, friends and admirers of Robert Francell Chew said goodbye with a spirited and moving celebration of life ceremony for the actor known as Proposition Joe. More than 100 persons crowded into the chapel at the Calvin B. Scruggs Funeral Home in east Baltimore on a cold, snow-dusted morning. They ranged from other Baltimore actors who had won featured roles in HBO's "The Wire," like Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, to Raymond Parker, the high school music teacher who rook Chew under his wing at Patterson High, taught him to sing Italian opera and helped him get an audition that led to a four-year scholarship at Morgan State University.
EXPLORE
December 4, 2012
Daniel Simons, managing partner of Hubbard Funeral Home, and his wife Heather will pick up 30 Christmas trees in North Carolina to give to the families of deployed Maryland National Guard veterans, in honor of their service. The Maryland National Guard Teen Council will help load the trees on the recipients' vehicles Dec. 8. A visit from Santa is expected and light refreshments will be served at the Wilkens Avenue funeral home.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Melvin B. Lowe Jr., a floral designer and funeral home attendant who was also a partner in a special-events and decorating company, died Sept. 27 of renal failure at his Washington home. The one-time Northeast Baltimore resident was 47. "Melvin was a tremendously gifted person and could do many things," said Carlton C. Douglas, owner of Carlton C. Douglas Funeral Services in Baltimore, where Mr. Lowe was employed. "He was a gifted artist who could arrange flowers or redesign a casket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
A Baltimore funeral home  is among those featured in an ESPN campaign from Academy-Award-winning director Errol Morris that launched today. The project, which includes 15-, 30- and 60-second trailers as well as a short documentary, looks at sports-themed funerals and fans who want to take their love of the games to the grave with them. The project is called "It's Not Crazy, It's Sports. " Morris visits the Kaczorowski Funeral Home in Dundalk where viewers get a look at an Orioles casket and hear about a Ravens-themed funeral.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1998
Leroy O. Dyett, a Baltimore mortician who built his Liberty Heights Avenue business into one of the city's best-known funeral homes, died Thursday of heart failure at his West Baltimore home.Mr. Dyett, 69, had operated the Leroy O. Dyett and Son Funeral Home in Northwest Baltimore since 1982. From the mid-1950s until he opened his business, he was co-owner of the Morton and Dyett Funeral Home in West Baltimore.One of Mr. Dyett's finest qualities, friends and relatives said, was his work ethic: Not only did he show up seven days a week, but he was usually the first person at the funeral parlor and the last one to leave.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2001
Robert C. Altenburg, owner and president of Altenburg Funeral Home in Hamilton, died Thursday at Good Samaritan Hospital of complications from a heart condition. He was 76. For years, Mr. Altenburg combined business with good works, splitting his time between his company and volunteer projects. When he learned of poor families who had lost a child, he was known to come to the rescue, said his daughter, Darlene Altenburg of Baltimore. She recalled one struggling couple whose 18-month-old baby died of a congenital defect and another whose 2-month-old infant died last year.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
Joseph Russ, a West Baltimore mortician who was active in his industry for nearly 70 years, died of heart disease April 16 at his West Baltimore home. He was 98. Born in Baltimore and raised on Brunt Street, he was a 1933 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. He also had diplomas from the old Cortez Peters School of Business and the Family Bible Institute. In 1941 he married Emma Lucille White, whom he affectionately nicknamed "Lamb Pie. " That year, they established a funeral business at Dolphin and McCulloh streets.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
Elizabeth L. "Bobbi" Phillips, who co-founded and operated a West Baltimore funeral home, died of congestive heart failure Dec. 28 at her home. She was 93. Born Elizabeth Lattimore in Baltimore and raised on Schroeder Street, she was a 1936 Frederick Douglass High School graduate. She earned a diploma at the old Cortez Peters Business School on Eutaw Place. She also attended the University of Maryland, College Park and Morgan State University. "She was a woman of amazing fortitude, natural beauty, dignity, strong character, modesty, unrelenting strength and quietness, and calmness of spirit," said Doretha "Dottie" Hector, a co-owner of the funeral business, who worked closely with her for the past 30 years and now runs the business.
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