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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 16, 1996
Cash flows into mutual funds that invest in stocks slowed a bit in May from April's level, but demand remained strong, with aggressive growth funds continuing to attract the largest portion of assets, an industry group estimated last week.Mutual funds that invest primarily in stocks took in an estimated $22.5 billion in net new cash in May, down from April's total of $26.4 billion but still the third highest monthly total on record, according to the Investment Company Institute of Washington.
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BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,Chicago Tribune | October 19, 2008
It's the dilemma facing just about anyone who dares peek into their 401(k) statements or other investments these days: Should they sell a mutual fund or all their funds? Just about anything in a 401(k) looks ugly - downright terrifying. So what's a person to do? This is becoming an increasingly complex decision, even for the pros who are starting to realize that current financial conditions aren't modeling the experiences they've had for the past couple of decades. "We've been talking people down from the ledge," said Edina, Minn.
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BUSINESS
April 23, 1998
Executives of the newly formed Monument Funds Group Inc. said yesterday that they expect the Baltimore-Washington region "outperform" most other areas of the country in the next three to five years."
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | October 30, 2007
How safe is your money-market fund? For investors who do not have the stomach for the ups and downs of the stock market, money-market funds have boomed in recent years as a haven for consumers to park their money. Investments can earn almost 5 percent annually in some of the biggest funds, supposedly without the risks associated with stock markets. But since summer, problems have cropped up in several large money-market funds, showing that to achieve higher returns and attract more customers, some money-market managers may have been investing in riskier holdings.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1998
Monument Funds Group Inc. has launched a mutual fund that invests in Internet stocks, the company said yesterday.The fund, called the Monument Internet Fund, will invest at least 65 percent of its assets in companies involved in the World Wide Web, e-mail, electronic commerce and other Internet services.Companies must generate at least 50 percent of their assets, gross income or net profit from Internet-related businesses to be considered for the fund."We understand these kind of companies and what makes them tick," said David A. Kugler, president of Laurel-based Monument Funds Group.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Watterson and Thomas Watterson,Boston Globe | May 10, 1992
Mutual funds are used to meet a lot of goals. One mentioned most often is saving for retirement.But what about after retirement? For many retirees, the last day of work is the day they start concentrating on capital preservation and income. Funds that invest in U.S. Treasury securities, government agency securities and high-grade corporate bonds suddenly get all their attention.Meanwhile, funds that invest in stocks are retired from the portfolio."That's a mistake," said Patricia A. Ganley, editor of Mutual Fund Preview, a newsletter published by the Financial Research Center in Holliston, Mass.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 28, 1993
Investors chasing higher interest rates have switched billions of dollars out of low-yielding money-market funds and bank accounts into mutual funds that invest in bonds.Some of those investors have received a lesson in the past few weeks: The higher yields paid by bonds and bond funds carry with them the risk that the value of principal can fall.Bond prices move in the opposite direction from interest rates. Interest rates on long-term bonds have moved up more than one-half of a percentage point since mid-October.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,Washington Post Writers Group | April 26, 1992
New York -- The most sure-fire stock market investments I know are having a bumpy ride. I'm speaking of "index" mutual funds.For most of the 1980s, the index funds outperformed at least two-thirds of all stock-owning mutual funds that invest for growth, said Morningstar Inc. in Chicago. Last year and the first quarter of this year, though, indexed investments lagged.They can still be fine buys, says John Rekenthaler, editor of Morningstar Mutual Funds. But for certain investments, indexing isn't the way to go.An index fund makes no effort to pick winning stocks.
BUSINESS
By NEWSDAY | September 22, 1996
With the U.S. stock market flailing with every new economic statistic, investors may want to look overseas to diversify their holdings. Foreign markets do not always move in tandem with the United States, and that gives you a chance to offset some of the bumps of the domestic markets."
BUSINESS
By Emily Hall and Emily Hall,MORNINGSTAR.COM | August 3, 2003
What good are GNMA funds? I love this question! I wish I could take this query and fill in a different fund group each week: What good are REIT funds? What good are precious metals funds? What good are international bond funds? (You get the idea ...) But this was about GNMA funds only, so I promise to limit my comments. Before I address the pros and cons of GNMA (also known as Ginnie Mae) funds, I thought I'd spend a little time on definitions. What exactly is a GNMA fund anyway? A GNMA fund invests the majority of its assets in pools of mortgage securities backed by the Government National Mortgage Association.
BUSINESS
By The Dallas Morning News | September 19, 2006
DALLAS -- Investing heaven may be only a sin away. The Dallas-based Vice Fund has left political correctness to others and sinfully gone where other mutual funds fear to tread. The Vice Fund, which celebrated its fourth anniversary on Aug. 30, invests in casino stocks and companies that make liquor, tobacco and bombs. Given people's proclivities to drink, smoke, gamble and blow each other up no matter what the economic climate, it should come as no surprise that the Vice Fund has been a consistent top performer.
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
For years Wall Street had hoped for clearer signals from the Federal Reserve on the future of the nation's monetary policy. They got their wish with the retirement of longtime Chairman Alan Greenspan, who was known for what could be called the financial equivalent of speaking in tongues. February marked the ascendancy of plain-spoken Ben S. Bernanke as the new chief. But mutual fund investors might be pining for the old days and just assume Bernanke had kept his mouth shut. After a volatile springtime on the market, when Bernanke's rhetoric on inflation sparked both a huge sell-off and a smaller rally, stock funds ended the second quarter down 2.7 percent and bond funds finished relatively even at plus 0.2 percent, according to mutual-fund tracking firm Lipper Inc. Among more than 250 Maryland-based mutual funds, only about two dozen funds that invest in stocks posted positive returns, while most bond funds had lukewarm returns within 1 percentage point of zero, a survey by Bloomberg Funds shows.
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
The "supertanker" that is the U.S. economy seems to have lost its course. The famously bullish Goldman Sachs & Co. strategist Abby Joseph Cohen coined the "supertanker" analogy in the 1990s to describe an American economy able to chug forward despite choppy waters buffeting its hull. The message was to buy U.S. stocks. Last year, the U.S. economy did expand despite the head winds of higher oil prices and rising interest rates, yet the nation's stock markets went nowhere. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was up 3 percent and the Dow Jones industrial average was down less than 1 percent.
BUSINESS
By CHRISTINE BENZ and CHRISTINE BENZ,MORNINGSTAR.COM | December 25, 2005
Like an extended warranty on a new PC or the time-share pitch that's disguised as a "free" vacation, knowledgeable consumers know that some deals that look good on the surface aren't all they're cracked up to be once you read the fine print. The same holds true in the investing industry, where financial-services firms often make products look like bargains even when they're not. Bottom line: Never forget that financial-services companies aren't in this business to be altruistic; they're in it to make a profit.
BUSINESS
By Emily Hall and Emily Hall,MORNINGSTAR.COM | August 3, 2003
What good are GNMA funds? I love this question! I wish I could take this query and fill in a different fund group each week: What good are REIT funds? What good are precious metals funds? What good are international bond funds? (You get the idea ...) But this was about GNMA funds only, so I promise to limit my comments. Before I address the pros and cons of GNMA (also known as Ginnie Mae) funds, I thought I'd spend a little time on definitions. What exactly is a GNMA fund anyway? A GNMA fund invests the majority of its assets in pools of mortgage securities backed by the Government National Mortgage Association.
BUSINESS
By Emily Hall and Emily Hall,MORNINGSTAR.COM | December 29, 2002
I'm planning on entering the Peace Corps in the spring. Where are the safest places to leave my investments, considering I won't be able to easily manage my money? After a brutal year like 2002, it's probably pretty scary to leave your investments behind and venture off to a place where you can't review your accounts on a daily basis. Of course, it can also be kind of liberating to force yourself to stop obsessively checking on your funds' fortunes - as long as you know you've left your investments in good hands.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | December 5, 1999
IT WASN'T long ago that investors turned their backs on Japan.Who could blame them? The world's second-largest economy was mired in recession, its banking system foundered with billions in bad loans, and the Japanese government seemed apathetic to taking steps to pull the country from its morass.Many of the problems still exist, but investors, who have held fast to mutual funds that invest in the country, are suddenly finding themselves far richer.The reason? Japan as an investment has suddenly gotten hot. Funds that invest in Japan are up 104.72 percent as of Nov. 26, according to Lipper Inc., a New York-based firm that tracks the performance of mutual funds.
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
The "supertanker" that is the U.S. economy seems to have lost its course. The famously bullish Goldman Sachs & Co. strategist Abby Joseph Cohen coined the "supertanker" analogy in the 1990s to describe an American economy able to chug forward despite choppy waters buffeting its hull. The message was to buy U.S. stocks. Last year, the U.S. economy did expand despite the head winds of higher oil prices and rising interest rates, yet the nation's stock markets went nowhere. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was up 3 percent and the Dow Jones industrial average was down less than 1 percent.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | December 5, 1999
IT WASN'T long ago that investors turned their backs on Japan.Who could blame them? The world's second-largest economy was mired in recession, its banking system foundered with billions in bad loans, and the Japanese government seemed apathetic to taking steps to pull the country from its morass.Many of the problems still exist, but investors, who have held fast to mutual funds that invest in the country, are suddenly finding themselves far richer.The reason? Japan as an investment has suddenly gotten hot. Funds that invest in Japan are up 104.72 percent as of Nov. 26, according to Lipper Inc., a New York-based firm that tracks the performance of mutual funds.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
Boasting about mutual funds certainly doesn't make for spicy chatter on the golf course. Yet, people would gladly blow a birdie than miss a story about an Internet stock conquest.While mutual funds lack sex appeal, experts advise average investors to stick with them and fight the temptation to pick stocks on their own."Too many people don't have the time, the inclination or the intelligence [to select stocks]," said Thomas Grzymala, president of Alexandria Financial Associates Ltd. "It is a lot easier to pick a good fund manager and let them do the grunt work."
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