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By Maryland State Board of Education | October 26, 1992
AVERAGE SCORES School .. .. .. .. .. Reading .. Math .. Citizenship .. WritingAtholton ... .. .. .. 386 ... .. 365 ... 365 . .. .. .. 373Centennial . .. .. .. 396 ... .. 373 ... 377 . .. .. .. 375Glenelg . .. .. .. .. 389 ... .. 365 ... 371 . .. .. .. 371Hammond . .. .. .. .. 386 ... .. 358 ... 372 . .. .. .. 373Howard .. .. .. .. .. 380 ... .. 355 ... 367 . .. .. .. 368Mount Hebron .. .. .. 389 ... .. 367 ... 377 . .. .. .. 369Oakland Mills . .. .. 386...
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NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
The session is devoted to reviewing test questions on math, and the teacher asks his students how they can figure out the total price of six compact discs costing $12.75 each. "Add or multiply," the students answer correctly, a sign that they could reverse their failing scores on a state test that landed them in this summer class. At Overlea High School in Baltimore County, July is not too early to start helping poorly performing students pass high-stakes tests. For the past five summers, Principal James F. Thanner has brought three dozen incoming ninth-graders into the building early for just such work.
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NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | December 19, 1991
Despite opposition from superintendents and school boards,the State Board of Education voted yesterday to make community service a graduation requirement -- but board members compromised by leaving it up to localities to decide how students will serve and for how long.If approved in March, it would make Maryland the first state in the country to mandate student service.And in a decision that caught local school systems off-guard, the board proposed that students will start taking the Maryland Functional Tests in seventh grade instead of ninth or 10th grade.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
Baltimore secondary students who struggled last year to pass state tests measuring basic competency in reading and math may have more trouble passing more challenging exams being used for the first time in high schools across Maryland. This year's ninth-graders will be the first to be officially scored on the state's new High School Assessments, which measure students' knowledge in subjects such as algebra, English, biology and government. Those exams are far more rigorous than the Maryland Functional tests - designed to ensure that children know how to read a glossary, change a fraction to a percent and identify the main idea of a text passage, among other things.
NEWS
November 18, 1993
Once again, the Carroll County school system received solid marks in the state functional tests that measure basic academic achievement. The system was able to achieve these admirable results even though its per pupil spending is about $800 less than the state average.Parents, teachers, administrators and students should be pleased. At the same time, it should be noted that, on average, there are few poor children among the county's student population. While poverty doesn't determine scholastic achievement, there is a high correlation between poverty and poor academic performance.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
Baltimore secondary students who struggled last year to pass state tests measuring basic competency in reading and math may have more trouble passing more challenging exams being used for the first time in high schools across Maryland. This year's ninth-graders will be the first to be officially scored on the state's new High School Assessments, which measure students' knowledge in subjects such as algebra, English, biology and government. Those exams are far more rigorous than the Maryland Functional tests - designed to ensure that children know how to read a glossary, change a fraction to a percent and identify the main idea of a text passage, among other things.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | March 9, 1993
Little opposition is expected to a school board vote tomorrow that would end driver education by the summer of 1994, according to a school spokeswoman.At the behest of high school principals, the board will vote on dropping driver education as part of the school day, taught by school employees.The Board of Education is scheduled to meet at 9 a.m. tomorrow at its headquarters in the Courthouse Annex, 55 N. Court St., Westminster.The administration proposes letting a private firm offer driving courses after school hours and in the summer, in school buildings.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
Students now in Maryland public high schools will be the last required to pass the functional citizenship test, if schools can guarantee that their students are learning the facts they need to know about government.To begin to clear time and money for new high school graduation tests, the Maryland State Board of Education agreed Wednesday to waive the test for students who are starting high school next year. By unanimous vote, the board gave state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick authority to grant waivers on a district-by-district basis.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1999
Howard County school officials are proposing tougher standards that could require eighth-graders to repeat the year if they fail certain basic tests, a step no other Maryland school system has taken.The policy would require educators to automatically consider holding back eighth-graders who fail the Maryland Functional Tests in writing, reading or mathematics. It would also require that eighth-graders who fail any of these tests attend summer school.About 400 Howard County students now in ninth grade failed to pass one or more of the tests by the end of middle school, said Gene Streagle, director of high schools for the county.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | May 22, 1991
Schools will be judged by one more category this November when the second annual state "report card" is issued: whether their 11th-graders have mastered the basic minimum skills tested by the Maryland Functional Tests.The state Board of Education agreed yesterday to hold a public hearing next month on what performance levels to set for 11th-graders on the tests, which measure skills that the students are expected to know in ninth grade and are a prerequisite for graduation. The report card already includes statistics on whether ninth-graders are passing the tests, as well as other data on dropout, attendance and grade promotion rates.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
Baltimore's middle and high school students scored significantly worse last year on state tests measuring basic reading and math skills - a stark reminder, education officials say, of how badly reform is needed in the school system's secondary grades. Citywide, 62 percent of students in grades six through 12 who took the Maryland Functional reading test passed it, down from 69 percent the previous school year. The news was worse in math: Only 18 percent of students who took the test passed, down from 26 percent the year before.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2000
Principals, business leaders and education activists from across Maryland urged the state school board yesterday not to abandon plans for high school graduation exams, and their lobbying appeared to succeed. State school board President Edward Andrews -- who a month ago threatened to propose that the board kill the tests during a critical vote scheduled for this morning -- said yesterday that the testimony persuaded him to keep pushing ahead with the core of the state's plan for a rigorous set of tests.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1999
Howard County school officials are proposing tougher standards that could require eighth-graders to repeat the year if they fail certain basic tests, a step no other Maryland school system has taken.The policy would require educators to automatically consider holding back eighth-graders who fail the Maryland Functional Tests in writing, reading or mathematics. It would also require that eighth-graders who fail any of these tests attend summer school.About 400 Howard County students now in ninth grade failed to pass one or more of the tests by the end of middle school, said Gene Streagle, director of high schools for the county.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1998
Students now in Maryland public high schools will be the last required to pass the functional citizenship test, if schools can guarantee that their students are learning the facts they need to know about government.To begin to clear time and money for new high school graduation tests, the Maryland State Board of Education agreed Wednesday to waive the test for students who are starting high school next year. By unanimous vote, the board gave state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick authority to grant waivers on a district-by-district basis.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1997
The Maryland State Board of Education pushed the state closer to high-stakes graduation tests yesterday by making the new exams a high school requirement, beginning with the Class of 2004.In a series of unanimous decisions, board members set a tentative timetable for phasing in as many as 10 tests in four subjects. The tests are supposed to be more rigorous than the functional tests now required for high school graduation.Passing three tests would be required for the first class, but that could be changed, as could the plan to require seven tests for the Class of 2005 and 10 tests for the Class of 2006.
NEWS
By Andrew McBee | December 10, 1997
ASSESSMENT is all the rage these days among public school administrators, from lowly principals up to State Superintendent Nancy Grasmick.We already have the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP), which measures each school -- attendance, promotion rate and student scores on state functional tests -- in an attempt to ensure that students are successful.Today, the state Board of Education will vote on whether to require students to pass a series of tough tests during high school to earn diplomas.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Howard Libit contributed to this article | November 20, 1997
A "breach of security" in Maryland's functional math test -- required for high school graduation -- means that 60,000 students across the state will have to retake the test at a cost to the state of between $50,000 and $100,000.About 850 of those students are 12th-graders, who must pass the exam and the state's functional tests in other subjects to graduate.Ronald A. Peiffer, spokesman for the Maryland State Department of Education, said yesterday that state officials found out in the -- past week that "some practice material" given to some students before the last administration of the test in October was identical to some of the questions on the test.
NEWS
November 17, 1992
Howard school officials have plenty to crow about in the latest results from the Maryland functional tests.Howard, along with Carroll County, were the only jurisdictions to score a "satisfactory" or "excellent" in every category, including reading, mathematics, writing and citizenship.What that means is that by the 11th grade, 98.3 percent or more of Howard County students passed all the tests the state requires forgraduation.Not unexpectedly, Superintendent Michael Hickey seized uponthe results to make the best case he can for shielding the school system from budget cuts that would harm the classroom.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Howard Libit contributed to this article | November 20, 1997
A "breach of security" in Maryland's functional math test -- required for high school graduation -- means that 60,000 students across the state will have to retake the test at a cost to the state of between $50,000 and $100,000.About 850 of those students are 12th-graders, who must pass the exam and the state's functional tests in other subjects to graduate.Ronald A. Peiffer, spokesman for the Maryland State Department of Education, said yesterday that state officials found out in the -- past week that "some practice material" given to some students before the last administration of the test in October was identical to some of the questions on the test.
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