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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 16, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Michael Jackson, who ended his world tour last week and promptly dropped out of sight, is so addled by his addiction to pain killers that he is "barely able to function adequately on an intellectual level," one of his lawyers said yesterday.But Mr. Jackson's attorneys insisted that the entertainer is not fleeing allegations that he sexually molested a 13-year-old boy. They addedthat Mr. Jackson expects to return to the United States after he completes a six- to eight-week drug-treatment program at an undisclosed facility outside the country.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 1, 2014
I was in Seattle recently to congratulate union and community organizers who helped that city enact the first $15-per-hour minimum wage in the country. Other cities and states should followSeattle's example. Contrary to the dire predictions of opponents, the hike won't cost Seattle jobs. In fact, it will put more money into the hands of low-wage workers who are likely to spend almost all of it in the vicinity. That will create jobs. Conservatives believe the economy functions better if the rich have more money and everyone else has less.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 16, 2001
I have been fighting a periodic keyboard problem with my Compaq Presario 7470, which is running Windows 98, since I purchased it six months ago. The keyboard loses all communication with the PC (the mouse still works) and it is only remedied by rebooting. It seems to happen after some uptime, and often after the power sleep cycle has been used. I've tried refreshing the keyboard driver with no success. Any suggestions? Whoever invented the so-called sleep function for PCs and Macs should be dragged to the village green and fed coffee for a week of seven sleepless nights for penance.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The state's Mental Hygiene Administration didn't have adequate procedures to ensure consumers given care were eligible, according to audit by the Department of Legislative Services during fiscal 2013. The state funds in question totaled $16.4 million. The total budget that year was $788 million when federal funds were counted. The audit also found reviews weren't done in a timely manner by an accounting firm hired to monitor some of the agency's fiscal functions, with some reviews taking up to an extra 21 months.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1998
Despite the dozens of Montessori schools in Maryland -- and thousands around the country -- the concept of Montessori education is largely a mystery. Many people know it only as a free-form approach to teaching young children in private schools "where the kids do what they want to do."Well, not exactly."The freedom in Montessori is not a license," said Virginia McHugh, executive director of the Association Montessori Internationale in this country. "It's freedom with limits. We want to be building responsibility."
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Contributing Writer | June 6, 1993
If you were to walk into the room, you'd immediately be impressed by its spaciousness and light. Then you'd notice some of the splendid details. The architecture was inspired by turn-of-the century Arts-and-Crafts style, embellished with handsome millwork in a pickled finish, creamy white tiles punctuated by colorful accents set-in like jewels, and striking, textured, stained-glass windows in tones of amber, wintergreen, lapis and plum.There are plenty of objets d'art to please the eye: art on the walls, sculpture and pretty vases filled with fresh flowers.
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 13, 1991
You open the door and -- Oh, no! Look out! -- objects of every imaginable color, size, shape, function and vintage tumble out on top of you.98112.)
NEWS
August 23, 1996
An article in yesterday's Anne Arundel edition of The Sun incorrectly reported which agency enforces the county zoning code. The Department of Planning and Code Enforcement handles that function.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/23/96
BUSINESS
By Harold Glicken and Harold Glicken,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 28, 1993
In freshman economics they taught us that there is no such thing as a free lunch. It was a lesson we have taken to heart and to the bank on many occasions.The folks at Computer Associates have come up with a variation on the free lunch axiom: Free software.Kiplinger's CA-Simply Money is simply free (except for a $6.95 mailing charge) to the first million callers.So what do you get for nothing?What you get is a very powerful personal financial program that makes good use of Windows 3.1. In this program icons are easily identifiable.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2004
A bill that would close what some say is a gaping loophole in the state's Open Meetings Act encountered resistance from a surprising source -- the media -- yesterday during a legislative committee hearing in Annapolis. The measure could end up being studied over the summer. "We are strong proponents of open government," said James Keith, speaking on behalf of the Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Association, which counts more than 150 newspapers -- including The Sun -- among its members. "However, we have a problem with this particular bill because we feel it is written too broadly."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Inside a three-story Victorian home in Towson, police said they found Baltimore County's first functional MDMA lab, producing a drug more commonly known as the trendy club drug "Molly. " Neighbors said they were surprised when county police officers and U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents rolled up to the house Wednesday morning and donned white hazmat suits before searching the home, just off York Road near the city line. Investigators found chemicals and glassware used to manufacture and sell MDMA, according to charging documents filed in District Court.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Testing hospital patients on their ability to perform everyday tasks before they are released could go a long way to keeping them from returning to the hospital, new research from Johns Hopkins University suggests. Tasks such as moving from a bed to a chair, eating, using the toilet and communicating are uniformly assessed after patients go to rehabilitation facilities from hospitals, but function isn't always tested in a standardized way before they go. And Hopkins researchers found that low scores on a standardized test of the tasks was a good predictor of hospital readmission.
NEWS
By Robert Gallo | April 20, 2014
Wednesday is the 30-year anniversary of the day my colleagues and I reported that a new retrovirus, now known as HIV, was the agent causing AIDS. We also announced the development of an effective HIV blood test and the capacity to continuously produce the virus so that drugs could be tested. Since then, basic science has driven a better understanding of how HIV infects humans, resulting in the development of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Last summer the National AIDS Treatment Advocacy Project reported that "a 20-year-old HIV-positive individual on ART in the U.S. or Canada is expected to live into their early 70s, a life expectancy approaching that in the general population.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
About 380 Verizon Wireless employees will lose their jobs at a Hanover call center as part of a national restructuring in which five centers will close and 3,000 workers will need to transfer to new offices or apply for new company jobs, the carrier told workers Wednesday. The Hanover center will not close, but will become a call center for government agency and business customers as opposed to individual consumers. It will be staffed by 320 workers who will move there from a Verizon call center in Laurel, which will remain open for other functions, said Paul Macchia, a Verizon Wireless spokesman.
HEALTH
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Maryland's poorly performing health exchange will cost taxpayers $33 million more than expected this year, bringing the state's total annual expense to $138 million, officials said Monday. The money is needed, in part, to pay the company hired to help fix the dysfunctional web site and to triple the work force at the state's call center, which has been overwhelmed by requests for help from customers struggling to buy insurance online. Even with the extra spending, it isn't certain the exchange can be fixed - or is worth fixing - in time for the next enrollment period in the fall, officials said.
HEALTH
Dan Rodricks | January 4, 2014
It has been 30 years since Dr. Robert Gallo became internationally famous for his role in the discovery of the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. He has wrestled with the question of a cure countless times since then. But only within the last year, he says, did he conclude that working toward a "functional cure" makes the most sense. AIDS has killed more than 36 million people around the world since the early 1980s. A similar number of people are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus that Gallo and French scientists co-discovered.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2004
A bill that would close what some say is a gaping loophole in the state's Open Meetings Act encountered resistance from a surprising source - the media - yesterday during a legislative committee hearing in Annapolis. The measure could end up being studied over the summer. "We are strong proponents of open government," said James Keith, speaking on behalf of the Maryland-Delaware-DC Press Association, which counts more than 150 newspapers - including The Sun - among its members. "However, we have a problem with this particular bill because we feel it is written too broadly."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | February 15, 1994
ROCKVILLE -- Human Genome Sciences Inc. said yesterday that its operations won't be affected by a National Institutes of Health decision not to pursue patents on gene fragments.The company's stock plummeted 14.4 percent Friday when the decision was announced. Yesterday, it lost an additional 7.7 percent, closing down $1.25, at $15.William A. Haseltine, Human Genome CEO, said the company's research includes determination of the full-length gene sequence as well as studies to confirm their biological function and commercial utility.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
Legg Mason Inc. will be laying off about 20 people in its auditing department in Baltimore at the end of the year. The Baltimore-based money manager plans to maintain a small auditing team whose work will be supplemented by a large accounting firm, the company said. The name of the firm was not disclosed. The company employs 387 in Baltimore. "By doing so, we have created a structure in which we have the flexibility to allocate resources across geographies as needed, tapping into the subject matter and product breadth expertise of our accounting partner, while maintaining a small core staff to ensure communication and institutional knowledge," the company said in a statement.
EXPLORE
January 18, 2013
The PETS Act is the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act and was passed in 2006. It was enacted after Hurricane Katrina because of provisions not being in place for pets during emergencies.   It requires state and local emergency preparedness operational plans take into account the needs of individuals with household pets and service animals before, during and after a disaster. People do not want to leave their pets during emergencies, such...
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