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NEWS
By From Staff Reports | May 20, 1994
Odorless fumes that stung eyes and scratched throats led to the evacuation of an exercise class for preschoolers yesterday at Providence United Methodist Church.Sixteen children and a like number of adults were taken to Sinai and Franklin Square hospitals by Baltimore County Fire Department ambulances after the incident.All were treated and released. A Sinai spokesman said hospital personnel examined everyone, but the condition had cleared up by the time they got to the hospital.Kellie Patrick, of Gymboree, a franchise program for preschoolers that teaches play and movement, said the children and their parents began complaining of discomfort about 10 a.m.A Sinai Hospital spokesman said the symptoms were consistent with exposure to Freon, a gas used in air conditioning systems, but Fire Department personnel later determined that Freon was not the cause.
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BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Users of the Uber car service experienced some sticker shock this weekend as they tried to hail a private car with their smartphone. The company has had a "surge pricing" policy for over a year - increasing rates during periods of high demand - but some Baltimore users reported seeing the policy in effect locally for the first time this weekend. Uber spokeswoman Nairi Hourdajian said the policy has been in place for the Baltimore region since Uber launched here in January, but this weekend was particually busy for its drivers because of the weather.
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NEWS
November 23, 1994
BALTIMORE -- An 18-month-old boy, one of seven children overcome by dangerous carbon monoxide fumes Monday night, remained hospitalized yesterday at the University of Maryland Medical Center, fire officials said.The condition of the toddler, Davon Harper, could not be learned. Nine other victims were released from hospitals yesterday. Officials said the occupants of a rowhouse in the 2400 block of E. Biddle St. were overcome by the odorless fumes about 10:30 p.m. when a furnace malfunctioned.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
The downtown streets that double as the course for the Grand Prix of Baltimore have provided IndyCar driver Will Power with bittersweet memories over the first two years of the event. In the race's inaugural running in 2011, Power started on the pole and led for 70 of the 75 laps en route to his sixth victory of the season. "It was not that straightforward; it was one of my best wins that I'll always remember," Power recalled Monday during a publicity tour in Baltimore for next month's race.
NEWS
March 19, 2003
An unidentified man was being held late yesterday at the county Detention Center after he was detained in a Forest Hill grocery store because a manager called the sheriff's office to report a suspicious customer. About 9 a.m., an employee of Klein's in the 2100 block of Rockspring Road said he noticed fumes from a man carrying a backpack, said spokeswoman Ginger Rigney. The state fire marshal's office bomb squad searched the backpack and found powdered drink mix. The man was charged with hindering a police investigation because he would not disclose his identity.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 22, 1994
A doctor and two nurses who were apparently poisoned by fumes from a dying woman in a strange medical episode Saturday night are recovering, but no one knows yet what caused their symptoms.The doctor and nurses became ill while treating a patient in the emergency room of Riverside General Hospital in Riverside, Calif. Medical experts are baffled over how the patient, Gloria Ramirez of Riverside, appears to have emitted toxic fumes.Ms. Ramirez, who was 31, was being treated for ovarian cancer.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
Seven plant workers of the Lehigh Portland Cement Co. in Union Bridge were taken to Carroll County General Hospital after they were partially overcome by fumes about 1:30 p.m. yesterday.David Roush, plant manager, said the men smelled a sulfur-like odor and became nauseated shortly after their lunch break in an area of one of the kilns.Mr. Roush said the wind was coming from the south and possibly caused emissions to blow back down one on the stacks while the stack was suffering from an insufficient supply of oxygen, causing the noxious fumes.
NEWS
By STAFF REPORT | May 16, 1997
Mysterious fumes in the George H. Fallon Federal Building downtown yesterday sent five women to area hospitals for treatment, Fire Department officials said. The fumes also caused the evacuation of the building.The cause of the gas had yet to be determined, said Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres.Pub Date: 5/16/97
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Peter Jensen and Joan Jacobson and Peter Jensen,Staff Writers | April 28, 1992
The Charles L. Benton Jr. Building remained closed today after gasoline fumes wafted from the basement of the downtown building that houses 1,200 city employees.Yesterday, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke sent workers home at noon after many complained of the fumes at the building at 417 E. Fayette St.Investigators believe the fumes may have been forced into the building by nearby construction of the Metro extension from Charles Center to Johns Hopkins Hospital.A spokesman for the state Department of the Environment said the fumes, identified as "weathered gasoline," are trapped below the basement.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | April 29, 1992
Approximately 1,200 Baltimore workers were to return to work today at a downtown municipal office building, two days after they were sent home because gasoline fumes had seeped from the ground into the air inside the building.Construction of a nearby subway tunnel, which is apparently forcing the fumes from the ground, was halted while the state's Mass Transit Administration worked to eliminate the noxious odor inside the building.A city spokesman yesterday said the fumes, which may be coming from underground gasoline storage tanks, "have greatly improved" but that environmental officials will continue to monitor the problem all day today.
NEWS
April 10, 2013
It's facile to say that if the extreme right and left of American politics dislike something, it must be a good idea, but in the case of President Barack Obama's budget proposal, it may be true. The president is taking one more stab at a "grand bargain" on the budget that would reduce deficits to a manageable size, through a combination of tax increases and spending cuts - including cuts to Medicare and Social Security. Some liberal groups are promising primary challenges to any Democrats who vote for a reduction in future Social Security benefits.
NEWS
May 25, 2012
In addition to the 10 measures outlined in the article, "Injury-prevention laws save lives, study says," (May 23), I believe a ban on smoking in Maryland is also a no-brainer. You can't walk anywhere in Maryland without having to inhale toxic cigarette fumes. It seems more people than ever are smoking in front of buildings everywhere with no concern about the effect on others who need to go in and out of buildings or who simply want to take a walk. People are even smoking in front of children near the schools in our neighborhood.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 27, 2012
Emergency operations officials in Harford County said persistent calls received about gas odors from numerous locations in the county early Friday morning appear to be related to fumes from an oil refinery in New Jersey. No sources of gas were found in the county, but local fire companies were busy throughout Friday morning and into the early afternoon responding to calls of gas odors or suspected gas leaks. Harford Emergency Operations spokesman Rick Ayers said early Friday morning the county was informed by state emergency operations officials that fumes from an industrial facility in New Jersey had been detected in the air in Harford and Cecil counties and in New Castle County, Del. In a later statement, the county government said the fumes were from an oil refinery in Paulsboro, N.J., which is on the New Jersey shore of the Delaware River and across the river from Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
A second woman has been charged in the bleach and Pine-Sol fight that temporarily shut down a Baltimore County Walmart in the fall. A Baltimore County grand jury has indicted Ebony Odoms, 27, of Reisterstown, on charges of first-degree assault, reckless endangerment and destruction of property in connection with the Oct. 8 fight. The chemical fumes from the incident caused 19 people to be taken to area hospitals. Odoms is scheduled to be arraigned Thursday. "Whatever she did was only in self-defense," said her attorney Stephen R. Tully.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2011
The boyfriend of a woman who was found fatally shot along with her 4-year-old daughter in a Parkville apartment has been arrested in the killings. Brian Lamont Eggleston Jr., 28, was charged Wednesday with two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of Alicia Avery, 25, and her daughter, Darry'el, whose bodies were found Monday afternoon. Baltimore County Police Chief James W. Johnson said detectives suspected by early Tuesday that the slayings were the result of a domestic dispute.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Carbon monoxide leaks occur most often in winter, typically occurring when an improperly vented furnace is turned on for the season and worsening as the weather grows colder and the furnace runs more frequently. The lethal, odorless fumes are also associated with improperly vented hot water heaters, as well as with generators powered by gasoline or kerosene. People can also suffer carbon monoxide poisoning while warming up a car in a closed garage. "Carbon monoxide is silent and there is no smoke associated with it," Clifford S. Mitchell, assistant director for environmental health and food safety at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said Sunday.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
Benzene fumes that leaked into the basement of a home in Manchester yesterday forced the owners of the home to spend the night elsewhere.The county Health Department recommended that Charles J. Ehrenfeld Jr. and his wife not stay in the house, in the 3400 block of View Ridge Circle, said Lineboro Fire Chief John L. Krebs.High levels of benzene fumes were discovered leaking from a crack between the foundation and the floor of the 14-year-old, split-foyer house, he said.The toxic fumes are dangerous if a person breathes too much of it, Mr. Krebs said.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1998
An employee at the county women's shelter was overcome by noxious fumes yesterday after a resident inadvertently mixed common household cleansers, forcing authorities to evacuate the three-story Citizens Services Complex in Westminster.Elonda Lippy, shelter manager, was taken with respiratory problems to Carroll County General Hospital, authorities said. She was treated and released, a hospital spokeswoman said.The incident began about 9: 10 a.m. in the shelter's kitchen on the third floor of the complex at 10 Distillery Drive.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Gas fumes, possibly from a cleaning product in use for maintenance, sent three people to Sinai Hospital in Baltimore and forced the evacuation of 200 people from the Ellicott City District Court building Thursday afternoon. The three people sent to Sinai are in serious condition for exposure to what investigators believe was chlorine powder being used by a contract maintenance crew working on the ventilation system. A fourth visitor to the building was treated at the scene and a county police officer was treated and released.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | November 15, 2009
The problem:: A mystery device parked on a Canton corner emits fumes and makes noise all day. The back story:: Richard Przybyszewski's new neighbor of about six weeks hasn't been very friendly. All day and night, a generator on a trailer parked on South Clinton Street at Eastern Avenue rumbles and gives off noxious fumes, he said. "I woke up one morning early ... and there it was, unannounced, sitting there on the corner," he said. "It's been on 24-7, seven days a week." The machine, which bears a Sprint decal, is linked by wires to a building on the corner.
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