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December 31, 2009
Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels will return to work full-time next week after two months of recuperation from surgery to remove a tumor from his abdomen. It was not malignant and Daniels, 50, did not have to undergo follow-up therapy after his October surgery. A seven-hour surgery to remove part of Daniels' pancreas, called a Whipple procedure, was deemed a success at the time, and his recovery took about as long as expected. Daniels, who became the university's 14th president in March, worked part-time in December.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Baltimore schools CEO Gregory Thornton said Wednesday that he is in the early stages of assessing where the central office can be more efficient and already cut back on two expenditures criticized during the previous administration. During a meeting with The Baltimore Sun's editorial board, Thornton said he will not employ a full-time driver, a job that has paid six-figure wages to a police sergeant for several years because of overtime. Thornton has also directed that limits be placed on how much is spent on food for professional development events and other meetings.
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NEWS
By CAROL KLEIMAN and CAROL KLEIMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 28, 2005
I've always held fairly high positions, but in my new job I feel like a beginner. I have more work than two people can handle, and my manager wrote me up for the first time in my career. Even though I always help others, I'm told I'm a slacker. I work 55 hours a week and get dirty looks when I leave. I feel I'm being targeted. What can I do until I find another job? Write down your version of what happened and have it included in your personnel file. Quietly start to look for another job while continuing to work hard.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Changes to Baltimore's Head Start this fall will provide longer days and an extended school year for hundreds of children in its care, a move intended to help low-income parents free up time for work and boost the youngsters' development. Under a federal pilot initiative that gives the city more local control over the early education program, Head Start also will shift its focus to younger children by serving more of them, transferring many older children to pre-K programs in city schools.
NEWS
June 1, 2005
Q: I was recently fired from a school for using sick time. When I started working there in August, they gave me two vacation days and two sick days. I used up much of my time when my children got sick, and then I became ill. Each time, I had a doctor's slip, but my employer said it still counted as being absent. In the end, I missed an extra day and a half of work on top of the sick time I was allowed. Is this legal? D.F., Baltimore A: It's up to each employer to decide its policy on whether sick days count as absences.
NEWS
By TYEESHA DIXON and TYEESHA DIXON,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
Paula Brantner's job as a program director for a nonprofit group is centered in San Francisco. But she works from her home in Silver Spring. Brantner is a long-distance telecommuter - and has been for more than four years. She makes up just a sliver of the work force that is employed in a home office that is far from the company's main headquarters. Yet a number of businesses have gone to geographic extremes by allowing workers to telecommute full time - even if they live halfway around the world.
EXPLORE
February 23, 2012
Editor: In response to Allan Vought's ETC article regarding teachers pay, published Feb. 17, I can only wholeheartedly agree with his opinion. Even though I am a working retired person, when I worked full time, my average working day was 10 to 12 hours, 50 weeks a year. I sold for a living and was salaried with potential for bonuses if I worked hard and produced. Sometimes the bonuses were there and sometimes not. I had no job protection and if I did not produce, I could be terminated quickly.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and For The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
Last night, Isaac, who's 4 1/2, gave me the Valentine he had made for me at school. "I love my Mommy because sometimes she lets me watch shows in the morning. " Eeep, really? I mean, it could have been worse ("I love my Mommy because usually she says she's sorry after she yells"), but this basically means, "I love you because you recently stopped enforcing that rule I hate. " Yes, we were strictly show-free in the mornings (OK, well, at least most of the time) for quite a while.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 20, 2011
It's London week in the NFL. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who played American football across the pond two seasons ago, return to Wembley to "host" the Chicago Bears. The London experiment is now in its fifth year. The game hasn't sold out -- the NFL can blame the lockout for that -- but it has been well-attended in the past. But can interest be sustained if the NFL placed a team in London, or would it be a novelty act that faded away? John York, co-owner of the San Francisco 49ers and the head of the NFL owners' international committee, told BBC that having a franchise in London “is a long-range plan.” For now, they are trying to market the sport.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Football players at Douglass have a full-time academic coach this fall helping them not just to improve their grades, but to navigate the requirements for college admission. The 1st and Goal program is a pilot initiative designed by the Family League of Baltimore. Douglass received a grant from NFL Player Engagement to fund the program, which focuses on improving all aspects of student athletes' lives. Douglass athletic director Tina Queen said she hopes to expand the program next fall to include all sports, but because more student athletes play football than any other sport at the school, the 1st and Goal program is expected to have an immediate impact.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
Calvin G. Butler Jr. came to Baltimore nearly three years ago with one foot here and the other in Chicago, flying west on weekends to his wife and two teenagers. Now he's firmly in this region. His family moved to Cockeysville last summer. He's on two local nonprofit boards. And on Saturday, he took the helm at one of the city's largest employers, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. He's glad his stretch as a nomadic exec is over. And he's not the only one. "What I recognize is that I have a very patient wife," he said.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
It began as a casual search for a vacation home on the water. Sue and Tom Graham's main residence was in Jacksonville in Baltimore County. Each had a demanding job, and they grew weary of spending long hours in a car driving to and from the beach on summer weekends. They soon learned however, that waterfront property in Anne Arundel County, as well as in many areas of Baltimore County, was well out of their budgeted price range. "We looked at cabins and dumps, lots and shacks that sold for $400,000," said Sue Graham, 54, a clinical nurse specialist for medical-supply company Cook Medical.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Amazon.com will open a 1 million-square-foot distribution center that will employ 1,000 people at the site of the former General Motors plant in Southeast Baltimore, the company announced Tuesday. The company plans to hire locally for jobs packing and shipping books, electronics and other goods, and says its jobs pay more than the typical retail position. The new distribution center, expected to open in 2014, would revive a 2.8 million-square-foot site where city and state officials have tried to lure a large employer for several years.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Football players at Douglass have a full-time academic coach this fall helping them not just to improve their grades, but to navigate the requirements for college admission. The 1st and Goal program is a pilot initiative designed by the Family League of Baltimore. Douglass received a grant from NFL Player Engagement to fund the program, which focuses on improving all aspects of student athletes' lives. Douglass athletic director Tina Queen said she hopes to expand the program next fall to include all sports, but because more student athletes play football than any other sport at the school, the 1st and Goal program is expected to have an immediate impact.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Denison has announced the hiring of former Loyola University and Loyola High player Keith Euker and former Maryland assistant and player Fran Gormley as assistant coaches. "We are really fortunate to hire two top-notch people and coaches in Keith Euker and Fran Gormley," said head coach Mike Caravana . "Their teaching and coaching skills, as well as their love of the game, came across very strongly in their interviews. They also come to us with strong references within the coaching ranks.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
I was glad to see The Sun editorial board express strong support for the Baltimore art scene and the role that organizations like The Contemporary play in the vitality of the city's cultural life ("The Contemporary returns," July 8). Yet it is with some irony that I note the editorial's enthusiastic endorsement "for what a Sun critic once called 'the art of right now.'" The Sun has not had a full-time art critic since 2008. I am an artist and former exhibitions director at Goucher College during the golden age of Baltimore art criticism, when all four shows we put on each season were likely to be reviewed by both The Sun and the City Paper.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | August 3, 2012
In his first two seasons, Dannell Ellerbe went from undrafted rookie to hidden gem to injury-plagued. The Ravens inside linebacker added another label in 2011: starter. Ellerbe started in three of the four games that 13-time Pro Bowler Ray Lewis missed due to a toe injury. Ellerbe compiled 11 tackles (including a season-high seven against the Cleveland Browns on Dec. 4) in those three starts. Ellerbe, who is behind Lewis and Jameel McClain on the depth chart, doesn't wish injury on any of his teammates and is content to bide his time.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
To enhance its crime-fighting efforts in Columbia's Long Reach village, the Howard County state's attorney's office said yesterday it will add a full-time prosecutor to its "Hot Spot" program in the community.A state grant of about $44,000 will fund a portion of the salary of Joeday Newsom, a senior prosecutor who will work with police, juvenile justice and parole and probation officials to take cases in the Long Reach area to trial and develop crime-prevention efforts.County State's Attorney Marna McLendon said Newsom will also work with staff members at Long Reach High School and juvenile justice officials to develop ways to reduce truancy.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
Ryan Browning (Salisbury, Calvert Hall), who has served as an assistant at Vermont, Virginia, Goucher and Washington College, has been named assistant coach/recruiting coordinator of the Wagner men's lacrosse team. Browning becomes the first full-time assistant coach at Wagner since the program was established in 2000. Browning was a defenseman on the Sea Gulls Division III national championship teams in 2007 and 2008. At Wagner, Browning will work extensively with the Seahawk defense, while also playing a major role working with the faceoff unit.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Outside what was once a backyard garage, mugs, sponge holders and broad bowls are lined up on tables to dry. A peek inside the structure reveals dozens of butter dishes, teapots, toothbrush holders, bowls of every size, vases, trays and more, all in various stages of production, resting on racks of shelving. And by the windows, with sunlight illuminating their potter's wheels, Nevan Wise is turning brick-sized blobs of clay into pitchers, and her husband, Doug Wise, is shaping clay lumps into kitchen utensil jars.
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