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by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Full Tilt Brewing, Baltimore's newest craft beer producer, will release its flagship beer, Baltimore Pale Ale, on Saturday at the Americana in Canton. The release party will be held from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., and the first pint of Baltimore Pale Ale will be poured at 8 p.m. Baltimore Pale Ale pints will be sold for $2 all night. The founders and co-owners of Full Tilt Brewing are cousins Nick Fertig and Dan Baumiller. Full Tilt will also be launching its community support program at the release party.
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Full Tilt Brewing, Baltimore's newest craft beer producer, will release its flagship beer, Baltimore Pale Ale, on Saturday at the Americana in Canton. The release party will be held from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., and the first pint of Baltimore Pale Ale will be poured at 8 p.m. Baltimore Pale Ale pints will be sold for $2 all night. The founders and co-owners of Full Tilt Brewing are cousins Nick Fertig and Dan Baumiller. Full Tilt will also be launching its community support program at the release party.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
When it comes to pinball, Washington's loss is Baltimore's gain. The National Pinball Museum, unexpectedly and unceremoniously kicked out of its Georgetown location last summer, opens Jan. 14 next to Power Plant Live. Soon, in addition to checking out Port Discovery , eating a good meal and listening to some live rock 'n' roll, downtown visitors will be able to exercise their wrists and develop the fine art of keeping a metal ball in play without tilting the machine. In a city where John Waters is king and the delightfully quirky American Visionary Art Museum is one of the most vibrant tourist attractions, a museum devoted to pinball should be right at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
When it comes to pinball, Washington's loss is Baltimore's gain. The National Pinball Museum, unexpectedly and unceremoniously kicked out of its Georgetown location last summer, opens Jan. 14 next to Power Plant Live. Soon, in addition to checking out Port Discovery , eating a good meal and listening to some live rock 'n' roll, downtown visitors will be able to exercise their wrists and develop the fine art of keeping a metal ball in play without tilting the machine. In a city where John Waters is king and the delightfully quirky American Visionary Art Museum is one of the most vibrant tourist attractions, a museum devoted to pinball should be right at home.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | August 28, 1992
Is this even mathematically possible? How do you squeeze 79 legendary Colts players (including seven Hall of Famers), 150 band members, 20 cheerleaders, 55 superfans, 35 Pop Warner League players and 16 singers into 30 minutes of pre-game festivities and 12 minutes of half-time?Or what about this dilemma: What do you say to a Washington TV station that calls on the day of a game that already would be scrutinized by more than 200 members of the media, and wonders if it can be squeezed in somewhere?
FEATURES
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | January 11, 1991
ED BLAZEK was invited to a special showing of "Awakenings" in Washington this week because he is a crusader for people with Parkinson's disease. He became a crusader soon after he was diagnosed as having the disease nine years ago.He is 72, soft-spoken, tall and lean, a bit stooped now, and lives in the White Marsh area of Baltimore County. A retired manager for Martin Marietta Aerospace, where he ran the department that kept track of parts for the B-1 bomber, Blazek has started support groups for people with Parkinson's disease.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2002
For Richard Harris, control was everything. If only because he constantly seemed on the verge of losing it. Whether onstage as King Arthur in Camelot, onscreen as an English aristocrat turned American Indian in A Man Called Horse, or on record as the breathless crooner of Jimmy Webb's bizarre "MacArthur Park," certainly one of the most recklessly overwrought songs of the 1960s, Harris was a force of nature constantly pushing his own limits. Sometimes the results were exhilarating, sometimes they were embarrassing.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
There are the tapes, which may be truthful. There is the dress, possibly stained -- or is it just a T-shirt?There could be witnesses, perhaps Secret Service agents. There were the White House visits, maybe late at night. There is the presidential deposition, which may contain an admission of previous transgressions.Rarely has there been a news story in which the stakes are so great, the coverage so massive -- and the solid evidence so scarce.As soon as the story of White House intern Monica Lewinsky and President Clinton engulfed airwaves, newsprint and cyberspace 11 days ago, journalists began to speculate about impeachment.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Melody Holmes and Mary Gail Hare and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2001
Carroll officials urged residents of Eldersburg and Sykesville, the county's most populous area, yesterday to voluntarily conserve water or face mandatory restrictions as early as next week. The lingering heat wave and an increased demand for water are threatening to overwhelm South Carroll's public water system, which relies on a 30-year-old plant to draw and treat water from the Liberty Reservoir, and one well. About 18,000 people in South Carroll use public water. The Freedom Area Treatment Plant has been operating at full capacity for more than a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,Sun Staff | November 21, 1999
Pinball was supposed to have died years ago.There were citywide bans in the 1940s that claimed pinball was gambling. There were attacks from Asteroids, Donkey Kong and Pac-Man in the 1980s. But every time, pinball fought back and won a bonus round.This time, though, the game appears headed toward that dark hole between the flippers.WMS Industries, one of the world's last two pinball makers, shut down its production line Friday, leaving only Stern Pinball to make a dwindling number of games.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2006
Maybe you remember the hype that swirled around the Segway Human Transporter, the two-wheeled, battery-powered scooter that looked like something out of The Jetsons when it was introduced five years ago. Its inventor, Dean Kamen, crowed that it was "world-altering technology." Jeff Bezos, the amazon.com mogul, claimed it would "revolutionize the way cities are designed." The Segway would cure cancer and promote world peace. Then President Bush took a highly publicized spill on one in front of photographers in 2003, and when the image was beamed all over the world, you could feel the air going out of the Segway Fever balloon.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 29, 2004
BEIJING - For a city so consumed with remaking itself in time for the 2008 Olympics - building enough stadiums, roads and apartments to equip an entirely new capital - it is an odd sight: At the two highest-profile projects for the Beijing Games, the Olympic stadium and the swimming center, the work has all but stopped. But no one seems nervous about finishing the projects on time. On the contrary, organizers are trying to make sure they don't finish too early. When Athens was frantically working to be ready for this summer's Games, Beijing was laying foundations for structures that don't need to be finished for four more years.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2002
For Richard Harris, control was everything. If only because he constantly seemed on the verge of losing it. Whether onstage as King Arthur in Camelot, onscreen as an English aristocrat turned American Indian in A Man Called Horse, or on record as the breathless crooner of Jimmy Webb's bizarre "MacArthur Park," certainly one of the most recklessly overwrought songs of the 1960s, Harris was a force of nature constantly pushing his own limits. Sometimes the results were exhilarating, sometimes they were embarrassing.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Melody Holmes and Mary Gail Hare and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2001
Carroll officials urged residents of Eldersburg and Sykesville, the county's most populous area, yesterday to voluntarily conserve water or face mandatory restrictions as early as next week. The lingering heat wave and an increased demand for water are threatening to overwhelm South Carroll's public water system, which relies on a 30-year-old plant to draw and treat water from the Liberty Reservoir, and one well. About 18,000 people in South Carroll use public water. The Freedom Area Treatment Plant has been operating at full capacity for more than a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,Sun Staff | November 21, 1999
Pinball was supposed to have died years ago.There were citywide bans in the 1940s that claimed pinball was gambling. There were attacks from Asteroids, Donkey Kong and Pac-Man in the 1980s. But every time, pinball fought back and won a bonus round.This time, though, the game appears headed toward that dark hole between the flippers.WMS Industries, one of the world's last two pinball makers, shut down its production line Friday, leaving only Stern Pinball to make a dwindling number of games.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
There are the tapes, which may be truthful. There is the dress, possibly stained -- or is it just a T-shirt?There could be witnesses, perhaps Secret Service agents. There were the White House visits, maybe late at night. There is the presidential deposition, which may contain an admission of previous transgressions.Rarely has there been a news story in which the stakes are so great, the coverage so massive -- and the solid evidence so scarce.As soon as the story of White House intern Monica Lewinsky and President Clinton engulfed airwaves, newsprint and cyberspace 11 days ago, journalists began to speculate about impeachment.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2006
Maybe you remember the hype that swirled around the Segway Human Transporter, the two-wheeled, battery-powered scooter that looked like something out of The Jetsons when it was introduced five years ago. Its inventor, Dean Kamen, crowed that it was "world-altering technology." Jeff Bezos, the amazon.com mogul, claimed it would "revolutionize the way cities are designed." The Segway would cure cancer and promote world peace. Then President Bush took a highly publicized spill on one in front of photographers in 2003, and when the image was beamed all over the world, you could feel the air going out of the Segway Fever balloon.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | August 28, 1992
Is this even mathematically possible? How do you squeeze 79 legendary Colts players (including seven Hall of Famers), 150 band members, 20 cheerleaders, 55 superfans, 35 Pop Warner League players and 16 singers into 30 minutes of pre-game festivities and 12 minutes of half-time?Or what about this dilemma: What do you say to a Washington TV station that calls on the day of a game that already would be scrutinized by more than 200 members of the media, and wonders if it can be squeezed in somewhere?
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