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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
March's full moon arrives Wednesday morning, the first to fall after the vernal equinox. It is the fourth full moon after the winter solstice, something that usually falls in April. This full moon is known by names including Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Growing Moon, Waking Moon and Pink Moon. But if you ask sources like the Farmer's Almanac or Old Farmer's Almanac, it is the Full Worm Moon. In ancient times, the naming of full moons was dependent on where they fell relative to events like the winter solstice or vernal equinox, but modern usage sticks with the same moon name for any given month.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
A full lunar eclipse will occur during the Full Hunter's Moon, creating a spectacle that may make the moon appear in a rusty hue early Wednesday morning. The moon will be full at 6:51 a.m. Wednesday, so it will be shining big and bright Tuesday night, though it won't be technically full yet. Just about half an hour before that, the peak of a lunar eclipse will begin. "Totality" of lunar eclipse starts at 6:25 a.m., falling just before sunrise on the East Coast. The moon will be passing within the Earth's shadow.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
The Old Moon, January's full moon, rises shortly before midnight Wednesday within three hours of the lunar apogee, making some call it a "micro moon". The moon reaches its furthest point in its orbit shortly before 9 p.m. At 11:52 p.m., the moon reaches its full phase. January's full moon is also known as the Full Wolf Moon or Moon after Yule. That coincidence will make it the smallest full moon of the year. At about 250,000 miles away, 4 percent further than the moon's average distance, it can appear about 14 percent smaller and 30 percent dimmer than a "super moon", a full moon that coincides with the moon's perigee, or closest distance to Earth in orbit.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
September's full moon arrives at 9:38 p.m. Monday , known as both the Corn and Harvest moon. American Indians named it the Corn moon for coinciding with the crop's harvest, whereas the Harvest moon can fall in September or October, depending on which full moon is closest to the autumnal equinox, Sept. 23 this year. It is the third of three consecutive "supermoons," as it coincides with lunar perigee, when the moon is closest to Earth in its orbit. Such a coincidence can make the moon look larger and brighter than when full moons are closer to apogee, their furthest point from Earth, though it can be hard to tell with the naked eye. The celestial wonders don't stop there -- next month's full moon is not far from being considered a supermoon, and it coincides with a lunar eclipse that can give the moon a reddish hue, dubbed a "Blood Moon.
TRAVEL
By Theresa Sintetos, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Dewey Beach, Del. Delaware Music Festival Four stages, 22 bands, no cover charge - and did we mention it's at the beach? If this sounds like fun, head to the Delaware Music Festival. Since 2003, this festival has showcased performances by some of Delaware's best bands. Enjoy dancing, singing and a preview of summer fun all weekend at the Rusty Rudder. The Delaware Music Festival begins Friday, March 29, at 9 p.m. and continues until 1 a.m. March 31. The event at the Rust Rudder is free to the public.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 3, 2012
The moon reaches its fullest phase Tuesday, and its name is appropriate enough given the recent weather and the forecast: the Full Thunder Moon. The full moon technically arrives at 2:52 p.m. but will first appear in the Baltimore sky at 8:30 p.m. It may not be brightly visible until a little after that, as the sun sets at 8:37 p.m. It could also be blocked by storm clouds, with a chance for more severe weather in the forecast for Tuesday and Wednesday evenings . The July full moon is also known as the Full Buck Moon, according to the Farmer's Almanac , because this is the time of year bucks' antlers begin to form.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 8, 2012
You may not be able to see it through the rain clouds tonight, but a waning moon just past its fullest is up there. Luckily, I snapped a shot of it last night. The moon was technically "full" at 4:40 a.m. Thursday. It rises at 6:50 p.m. Thursday. March's full moon is known as the Worm Moon or the Sap Moon, for coming as worms begin to slither through softened ground and maple sap begins to run again.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
July's full moon arrives Monday night -- the "Full Thunder Moon" to many, appropriately enough given the weather this time of year. The moon is technically "full" at 2:16 p.m., so it will be slightly past that maximum brightness when it rises at 8:12 p.m. It will stay out until 5:51 a.m. Some other names for July's full moon are the Full Buck Moon, because around now is when new antlers begin to appear in male deer, and the Full Hay Moon, according...
NEWS
By Scott Dance | April 6, 2012
The Full Pink Moon should be in view all night. Other common names for April's full moon are the Egg Moon, Sprouting Grass Moon or Easter Moon, according to EarthSky.org. Easter Sunday falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. The moon will be flanked to its left by Spica, the brightest star of the constellation Virgo, as well as Saturn as it rises in the east sky.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
It seems hard to believe a month has passed since August's blue moon, but another full moon will be upon us Saturday night. The moon reaches its fullest point at 11:19 p.m., though there's a chance scattered clouds could block the view. Fortunately, showers are no longer in the forecast for overnight Saturday, but mostly cloudy skies are expected. This one is known as the Harvest Moon, the closest full moon to the autumnal equinox, or as the Corn Moon. The Harvest Moon moniker comes from the fact that, in the days before electric lights, farmers relied on the full moon of the harvesting season to finish their work by night, according to one NASA science news report . In case of clouds, look Friday and Sunday nights too to catch a glimpse.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
The largest full moon of 2014 rises Sunday, brightening the night sky just as the annual Perseid meteor shower peaks. The moon is full at 2:09 p.m. Sunday, rising at 7:54 p.m. in Baltimore. It's most commonly known as the Sturgeon Moon, and also as the Green Corn Moon and Grain Moon. It will appear slightly larger than normal, though it's hard to tell with the naked eye, because it coincides with the moon's perigee, when it is closest to Earth. It will be just shy of 222,000 miles away, more than 30,000 miles closer than when it reaches apogee, its furthest point from Earth.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
The full moon arrives Saturday morning, and it is the first of three in a row that can be considered a "supermoon. " The moon reaches fullness at 7:25 a.m. Saturday, so it should appear most full Friday night but also large and bright on Saturday night. It is known as the Full Buck Moon or Thunder Moon. This year, it can also be known as a supermoon because the centers of the Earth and moon are about 225,000 miles apart. The next two full moons will get progressively larger, with the closest in August, according to EarthSky.org.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
June's full moon, known as the Strawberry Moon, coincides with the ominous timing of Friday the 13th this year. The moon will be full at precisely 12:11 a.m. Friday, so essentially on Thursday night, not Friday night. But it will still shine brightly on Friday, perhaps behind some storm clouds. The "strawberry" name comes from the fact that it's strawberry season, and Algonquin tribes knew this was the time of year to gather them, according to the Old Farmer's Almanac. It is also known as the Rose Moon and the Hot Moon, according to the almanac.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
The Full Flower Moon, the second after the vernal equinox, occurs Wednesday. The moment the moon is technically full, by astronomical standards, is 3:16 p.m. So by the time it rises at 8:15 p.m. in Baltimore, it will already be past full, though to the naked eye, it will still look full, of course. The full moon can help you spot Saturn this month, as the two move in tandem across the southern sky throughout the night. The ringed planet will appear just to the west of the moon.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
A full lunar eclipse will occur early Tuesday morning, darkening the full moon and possibly tinting it a reddish hue that causes some to call it a "Blood Moon". For nearly an hour and a half, the moon will be dimmed and possibly appearing a copper color because of sunlight bent by the atmosphere. The total eclipse begins around 3 a.m. and ends around 4:30 a.m., with the moon at its dimmest at 3:46 a.m. The eclipse will be visible across the Americas as well as throughout the Pacific.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
The Old Moon, January's full moon, rises shortly before midnight Wednesday within three hours of the lunar apogee, making some call it a "micro moon". The moon reaches its furthest point in its orbit shortly before 9 p.m. At 11:52 p.m., the moon reaches its full phase. January's full moon is also known as the Full Wolf Moon or Moon after Yule. That coincidence will make it the smallest full moon of the year. At about 250,000 miles away, 4 percent further than the moon's average distance, it can appear about 14 percent smaller and 30 percent dimmer than a "super moon", a full moon that coincides with the moon's perigee, or closest distance to Earth in orbit.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
The Full Beaver Moon comes Saturday, brightening the sky and unfortunately making the Leonid meteor shower's peak and Comet ISON more difficult to see. The moon will be full at 10:16 a.m. Sunday, which actually means Saturday night's moon will appear the closest to full.  The moon gets its name from the fact that November was the time of year fur trappers set their snares, before swamps froze, according to the Farmer's Almanac . November's full...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Watch the Full Hunter's Moon arrive Friday night, from your backyard or along with planets and stars at the Maryland Science Center's observatory. The moon will appear at its largest and brightest in the sky at 7:38 p.m., while it is still relatively low in the sky. Sunset Friday is at 6:23 p.m., while moonrise is at 6:12 p.m. The "hunter's moon" is among the most well-known, always coming after September's harvest moon. October's full moon is also known as the Blood Moon or Sanguine Moon.
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