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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 23, 2013
Columbia's Slayton House has been turned into a strip club. The community center's eyebrow-raising transformation is only temporary, though, because its theater is hosting Silhouette Stages' lively production of "The Full Monty. " Although this Broadway musical is mostly good, clean fun, it's still best to leave the kids at home; for that matter, there are some adults who may not want to expose themselves to "The Full Monty. " As for the rest of us, well, it's easy to get into the slightly naughty spirit of a humorous musical in which unemployed steelworkers in Buffalo strip for a worthy cause, namely, themselves.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | May 23, 2013
Columbia's Slayton House has been turned into a strip club. The community center's eyebrow-raising transformation is only temporary, though, because its theater is hosting Silhouette Stages' lively production of "The Full Monty. " Although this Broadway musical is mostly good, clean fun, it's still best to leave the kids at home; for that matter, there are some adults who may not want to expose themselves to "The Full Monty. " As for the rest of us, well, it's easy to get into the slightly naughty spirit of a humorous musical in which unemployed steelworkers in Buffalo strip for a worthy cause, namely, themselves.
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FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 22, 2006
Like the steelworkers-turned-strippers in The Full Monty, Cockpit in Court took a chance with this musical, which is receiving its first homegrown local production at the summer theater. But while some of the show's language and situations may be a bit raw, ultimately, Monty has a lot of heart. Indeed, the central achievement of the 1997 British movie, the 2000 musical adaptation, and Cockpit's production is that you find yourself rooting for this motley assortment of out-of-work, out-of-shape guys.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
They won't even get a fig leaf. Next month, virtually the entire cast of the baseball drama Take Me Out will spend 10 long minutes on stage each night in the buff. Ten of the 11 actors - all volunteers, average Joes with day jobs like fixing computers - won't have the benefit of towels, strategically placed props or artful lighting. It's enough to give even the most dedicated of thespians stage fright. "When I heard that I got the part, my first reaction wasn't hesitancy, exactly, but 'Oh no, how am I going to do this?"
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1997
In the film "Brassed Off," unemployed British miners rediscover their self-respect by playing in a championship brass band. In "The Full Monty," unemployed British steelworkers turn to a more revealing form of entertainment. They become strippers.Therapeutic stripping? Psychologists may not endorse it, but the beleaguered men of "The Full Monty" are only able to cover themselves in dignity once they have shorn themselves of shirts and pants and -- yes -- scarlet G-strings.This has been a rough season at the movies for the Yorkshire laboring classes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and By J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 4, 2003
Can't dance. Can't strip. Must act. That's a shorthand description of what choreographer Jerry Mitchell was looking for in casting the Broadway musical The Full Monty. After all, the show, based on the 1997 British sleeper hit movie, is about a half-dozen unemployed steelworkers who put on a strip show to raise some cash. They're hardly Broadway hoofers, or the Chippendales, for that matter. (The touring production of The Full Monty opens a one-week run at the Mechanic Theatre on Tuesday.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 2, 2001
NEW YORK - This is "My Lunch with Andre." The setting is Sardi's, the famed theater district eatery. The tables are covered with crisp white cloths. The red walls display row upon row of caricatures of Broadway's finest. A recent addition to the gallery is a picture of Baltimore native Andre De Shields, who competes tomorrow night for a Tony Award. He's up for best featured actor for his role in the musical "The Full Monty." On a recent Thursday, De Shields broke his custom of skipping lunch to discuss everything from nudity to Shakespeare over steamed vegetables and tofu.
FEATURES
By Amy Wallace and Amy Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 24, 1998
Cannes, France - The battle to buy the first commercial discovery of the 1998 Cannes International Film Festival began quietly enough.Before its first screening last Monday afternoon, no one had seen "Waking Ned," a comedy made with no movie stars by British first-time writer-director, Kirk Jones. Jones, 33, had just driven the print down from London - a 15-hour trip - because plane tickets were too expensive."Cannes is so much about hype, but we just [sneaked] in the back door," Jones said of his film.
FEATURES
May 8, 2001
Tony nominations Best Play: "The Invention of Love," "King Hedley II," "Proof," "The Tale of the Allergist's Wife" Best Musical: "A Class Act," "The Full Monty," "Jane Eyre," "The Producers" Book of a Musical: "A Class Act," "The Full Monty," "Jane Eyre," "The Producers" Original Score: "A Class Act," "The Full Monty," "Jane Eyre," "The Producers" Revival - Play: "Betrayal," "The Best Man," "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," "The Search for Signs...
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
They won't even get a fig leaf. Next month, virtually the entire cast of the baseball drama Take Me Out will spend 10 long minutes on stage each night in the buff. Ten of the 11 actors - all volunteers, average Joes with day jobs like fixing computers - won't have the benefit of towels, strategically placed props or artful lighting. It's enough to give even the most dedicated of thespians stage fright. "When I heard that I got the part, my first reaction wasn't hesitancy, exactly, but 'Oh no, how am I going to do this?"
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | November 30, 2006
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, which opened amid a spate of other musicals based on movies, was overshadowed on Broadway - despite 11 nominations, it was shut out at the 2005 Tony Awards. But as the touring production at the Hippodrome reaffirms, the show is a solid, old-fashioned musical comedy, with the emphasis on comedy. If you don't laugh out loud at least a couple of times, you're simply not paying attention.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 22, 2006
Like the steelworkers-turned-strippers in The Full Monty, Cockpit in Court took a chance with this musical, which is receiving its first homegrown local production at the summer theater. But while some of the show's language and situations may be a bit raw, ultimately, Monty has a lot of heart. Indeed, the central achievement of the 1997 British movie, the 2000 musical adaptation, and Cockpit's production is that you find yourself rooting for this motley assortment of out-of-work, out-of-shape guys.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
It's a story about friendship, family values and self-confidence. A group of average Joes tries to make ends meet after being laid off, and they are truly tested to see how far they will go to keep their lives, and their families, together. The story is, of course, The Full Monty, which will be performed by the Cockpit in Court Summer Theatre tomorrow through July 2. Although a touring production played at the Mechanic Theatre in 2003, this is the first time the comedy has been produced by a Baltimore theater.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 8, 2003
The Full Monty is about six ordinary guys who take a chance and do something gutsy and bold. Stylistically, however, the 1997 movie wasn't especially daring, and neither is the musical based on that movie. Instead, the latter is a conventional musical of the feel-good variety. Nothing wrong with that, of course. And, the touring production at the Mechanic Theatre, like its Broadway predecessor, is a bona-fide tonic. Although there are occasional lags in pacing and some of the characterizations have become overly broad, the show as a whole is virtually guaranteed to leave you grinning.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and By J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 4, 2003
Can't dance. Can't strip. Must act. That's a shorthand description of what choreographer Jerry Mitchell was looking for in casting the Broadway musical The Full Monty. After all, the show, based on the 1997 British sleeper hit movie, is about a half-dozen unemployed steelworkers who put on a strip show to raise some cash. They're hardly Broadway hoofers, or the Chippendales, for that matter. (The touring production of The Full Monty opens a one-week run at the Mechanic Theatre on Tuesday.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 20, 2002
It was a good hair day for Hairspray in Seattle on Monday when the reviews came out for the new musical adapted from John Waters' 1988 movie. The show, which is playing an exclusive pre-Broadway engagement at Seattle's 5th Avenue Theatre, received positive reviews from the city's two major newspapers and Daily Variety. Here are excerpts: Misha Berson wrote in The Seattle Times: "A Bye Bye Birdie for the Age of Irony, this is a retro-pop romp with wit, heart, a social conscience and, rarity of rarities, a new score by composer Marc Shaiman and his co-lyricist Scott Wittman that really makes you want to go dance in the streets.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 7, 2001
Baltimore native Andre De Shields called Monday with a report on his experiences at the previous night's Tony Awards, where he was a nominee for best featured actor in a musical. If he was upset over losing to "The Producers' " Gary Beach, you couldn't tell it from his upbeat account of festivities that ended at 5 a.m. "The hard cold facts are that `The Producers' swept," he said. De Shields was nominated for his portrayal of a character nicknamed "Horse" in "The Full Monty." The number the cast performed on national TV Sunday was the famous strip scene.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 8, 2003
The Full Monty is about six ordinary guys who take a chance and do something gutsy and bold. Stylistically, however, the 1997 movie wasn't especially daring, and neither is the musical based on that movie. Instead, the latter is a conventional musical of the feel-good variety. Nothing wrong with that, of course. And, the touring production at the Mechanic Theatre, like its Broadway predecessor, is a bona-fide tonic. Although there are occasional lags in pacing and some of the characterizations have become overly broad, the show as a whole is virtually guaranteed to leave you grinning.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 7, 2001
Baltimore native Andre De Shields called Monday with a report on his experiences at the previous night's Tony Awards, where he was a nominee for best featured actor in a musical. If he was upset over losing to "The Producers' " Gary Beach, you couldn't tell it from his upbeat account of festivities that ended at 5 a.m. "The hard cold facts are that `The Producers' swept," he said. De Shields was nominated for his portrayal of a character nicknamed "Horse" in "The Full Monty." The number the cast performed on national TV Sunday was the famous strip scene.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 2, 2001
NEW YORK - This is "My Lunch with Andre." The setting is Sardi's, the famed theater district eatery. The tables are covered with crisp white cloths. The red walls display row upon row of caricatures of Broadway's finest. A recent addition to the gallery is a picture of Baltimore native Andre De Shields, who competes tomorrow night for a Tony Award. He's up for best featured actor for his role in the musical "The Full Monty." On a recent Thursday, De Shields broke his custom of skipping lunch to discuss everything from nudity to Shakespeare over steamed vegetables and tofu.
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