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NEWS
April 26, 2006
Janet Yellen, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. "We are now operating in the vicinity of full employment. The market for skilled workers does appear to have tightened noticeably, with some upward wage pressure emerging in some sectors."
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NEWS
December 24, 2013
A reader recently expressed concern over the federal deficit and faults the Democrats for failing to come to grips with entitlements ("Republicans aren't to blame for Washington gridlock," Dec. 20). He describes the state of our federal budget as a free fall into bankruptcy. In my opinion, these views are sheer nonsense. If our economy were threatened, interests rates would be sky high and investors and foreign governments would be dumping our treasury notes. Instead, interest rates are at record low levels and investors worldwide are clambering to buy U.S. government securities.
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NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | March 11, 1994
MONDAY, President Clinton will host an international summit on jobs in Detroit, to be attended by ministers from seven leading industrial nations. There are now over 30 million people unemployed in Western Europe and North America.Supposedly, the United States is doing relatively well, with "only" 6 percent to 7 percent joblessness, depending on how you count, compared with over 10 percent in Europe.Where the United States is not doing so well, however, is in the growth of wages and hence living standards.
NEWS
By Bill Barry | February 7, 2013
In all of the clamor about deficit reduction and fiscal cliffs, the assumption is that the U.S. economy is basically fine. The "jobs slump" is just that - a slump - so with proper government intervention (or lack thereof), the happy days of full employment will return. After all, the "recession" is just temporary, isn't it? There is a more devastating prospect: that the lost jobs are gone forever, leaving tens of millions of Americans, concentrated at opposite ends of the age scale, who may never work "permanently" again.
NEWS
By Staff report | September 16, 1990
Howard County's unemployment rose this July by .7 percent over July 1989 and is the first increase this year, according to estimates by the state Department of Employment and Economic Development.But at 2.9 percent, the county is still competing with Montgomery County's 2.7 percent for the state's lowest unemployment rate. Howard had the lowest rate in July 1989 with 2.2 percent.Statewide, the July unemployment percentage was 4.5, up from 3.6 for July 1989. The national percentage for July also rose, to 5.5 this year from 5.3 last year.
NEWS
February 20, 1995
HISTORY LESSONS from Prof./Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y. (On "Face the Nation):Question: Senator, the president laid out . . . [a] proposal for $60 billion in tax cuts. It's a question still whether it's good politics, but do you think it's good economics?Answer: Could I give a moment's history here? Because I think we're giving them the idea that the deficit is something that's written into the Constitution, it's the character of a democracy and so forth.Uh-uh. I came to Washington in the [John F.]
NEWS
December 6, 1996
UNEMPLOYMENT rates have dipped below 5 percent in the United States. But that good news is an exception. According to a new International Labor Organization report on world employment, some 34 million people are unemployed in the world's wealthiest nations. In the European Union, unemployment last year averaged 11.3 percent of the work force. And in many parts of the world, underemployment and poverty are a growing problem.It doesn't have to be this way, ILO economists argue. Contrary to those who predicted an "end of work" as technology takes over (( many tasks formerly done by people, their study finds that economic changes are bringing no significant drop in the growth of jobs, or in the number of solid, well-paying jobs.
NEWS
December 24, 2013
A reader recently expressed concern over the federal deficit and faults the Democrats for failing to come to grips with entitlements ("Republicans aren't to blame for Washington gridlock," Dec. 20). He describes the state of our federal budget as a free fall into bankruptcy. In my opinion, these views are sheer nonsense. If our economy were threatened, interests rates would be sky high and investors and foreign governments would be dumping our treasury notes. Instead, interest rates are at record low levels and investors worldwide are clambering to buy U.S. government securities.
NEWS
February 1, 2008
America's troubled economy now appears increasingly likely to slip into recession, a development with grim implications for the country and even relatively prosperous Maryland. The Federal Reserve, which this week lowered interest rates for the second time in two weeks, has done much of what it can do to ease the pain. But with continued bad news from America's largest investment firms and unrest in financial markets, even healthy businesses are girding for trouble. The negative evidence is everywhere.
NEWS
By Bill Barry | February 7, 2013
In all of the clamor about deficit reduction and fiscal cliffs, the assumption is that the U.S. economy is basically fine. The "jobs slump" is just that - a slump - so with proper government intervention (or lack thereof), the happy days of full employment will return. After all, the "recession" is just temporary, isn't it? There is a more devastating prospect: that the lost jobs are gone forever, leaving tens of millions of Americans, concentrated at opposite ends of the age scale, who may never work "permanently" again.
NEWS
February 1, 2008
America's troubled economy now appears increasingly likely to slip into recession, a development with grim implications for the country and even relatively prosperous Maryland. The Federal Reserve, which this week lowered interest rates for the second time in two weeks, has done much of what it can do to ease the pain. But with continued bad news from America's largest investment firms and unrest in financial markets, even healthy businesses are girding for trouble. The negative evidence is everywhere.
NEWS
April 26, 2006
Janet Yellen, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. "We are now operating in the vicinity of full employment. The market for skilled workers does appear to have tightened noticeably, with some upward wage pressure emerging in some sectors."
NEWS
December 6, 1996
UNEMPLOYMENT rates have dipped below 5 percent in the United States. But that good news is an exception. According to a new International Labor Organization report on world employment, some 34 million people are unemployed in the world's wealthiest nations. In the European Union, unemployment last year averaged 11.3 percent of the work force. And in many parts of the world, underemployment and poverty are a growing problem.It doesn't have to be this way, ILO economists argue. Contrary to those who predicted an "end of work" as technology takes over (( many tasks formerly done by people, their study finds that economic changes are bringing no significant drop in the growth of jobs, or in the number of solid, well-paying jobs.
NEWS
February 20, 1995
HISTORY LESSONS from Prof./Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, D-N.Y. (On "Face the Nation):Question: Senator, the president laid out . . . [a] proposal for $60 billion in tax cuts. It's a question still whether it's good politics, but do you think it's good economics?Answer: Could I give a moment's history here? Because I think we're giving them the idea that the deficit is something that's written into the Constitution, it's the character of a democracy and so forth.Uh-uh. I came to Washington in the [John F.]
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
Friday's report that the state and national unemployment rates had dropped to their lowest levels in more than four years might have escalated the inflation alarm among mainstream economists, but it didn't do much to convince people like Ed Meeks.Mr. Meeks, who is in charge of hiring for Baltimore-based Senior Campus Living Inc., had been waiting since September -- when unemployment fell below its so-called "natural" level of about 6 percent -- for the tightening job market to create worker shortages and force wage boosts at the retirement centers he helps to manage.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | March 11, 1994
MONDAY, President Clinton will host an international summit on jobs in Detroit, to be attended by ministers from seven leading industrial nations. There are now over 30 million people unemployed in Western Europe and North America.Supposedly, the United States is doing relatively well, with "only" 6 percent to 7 percent joblessness, depending on how you count, compared with over 10 percent in Europe.Where the United States is not doing so well, however, is in the growth of wages and hence living standards.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
Friday's report that the state and national unemployment rates had dropped to their lowest levels in more than four years might have escalated the inflation alarm among mainstream economists, but it didn't do much to convince people like Ed Meeks.Mr. Meeks, who is in charge of hiring for Baltimore-based Senior Campus Living Inc., had been waiting since September -- when unemployment fell below its so-called "natural" level of about 6 percent -- for the tightening job market to create worker shortages and force wage boosts at the retirement centers he helps to manage.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 4, 1999
O'Malley suddenly realized he is really going to become mayor and had better prepare, which is all to the good.Surprise! The best weapon against poverty is a full-employment economy.It is comforting to believe that soldiers commit atrocities only in unjust wars, not that there was ever evidence to support such faith.No one appreciated Warren Beatty's comic acting before.Pub Date: 10/04/99
NEWS
By Staff report | September 16, 1990
Howard County's unemployment rose this July by .7 percent over July 1989 and is the first increase this year, according to estimates by the state Department of Employment and Economic Development.But at 2.9 percent, the county is still competing with Montgomery County's 2.7 percent for the state's lowest unemployment rate. Howard had the lowest rate in July 1989 with 2.2 percent.Statewide, the July unemployment percentage was 4.5, up from 3.6 for July 1989. The national percentage for July also rose, to 5.5 this year from 5.3 last year.
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