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NEWS
February 28, 2000
Eliot A. Caplin, 86, a writer who devised the plots for a number of well-known comic strips, died Feb. 20 in Stockbridge, Mass. He cooperated with artists who produced strips such as "Heart of Juliet Jones," "Big Ben Bolt" and "Dr. Bobbs." He was the brother of "L'il Abner" cartoonist Al Capp. Although the brothers never collaborated on a strip, Mr. Capp conceived two strips that he passed along to Mr. Caplin. One, "Abbie an' Slats," drawn by Raeburn van Buren, lasted 23 years. The other was "Long Sam," drawn by Bob Lubbers.
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NEWS
May 30, 2013
Tom Horton's op-ed in praise of Norman Meadows and nuclear power presented inaccuracies ("Time for greens to embrace nukes," May 22). Climate change is a crisis that necessitates phasing out fossil fuels, but relying on nuclear power to replace them is neither possible nor safe. Nuclear, like wind, does need backup. Last week 20 of the 104 plants in the U.S. were at zero production including: Calvert Cliffs reactor offline twice this month with malfunctioning steam valves initially; Harris in Raleigh, weakness in vessel head, out since May 15; Palisades, leaking storage tanks, out since May 5th ; San Onofre's two reactors, premature tube wear, out for over a year; Fort Calhoun, safety violation since flooding, out since April, 2011.
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FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 18, 2003
A thumbnail history of Western art since the Renaissance might be described as an obsession with space - how it is imagined, depicted, experienced and remembered. The show at Maryland Art Place through Saturday touches intriguingly on the latter: The mental trace that is imprinted, however imperfectly, on our brains as the memory of a place. The nine artists in the show - Barry Bartlett, William Christenberry, Mary Douglas, Ken Fukushima, Brian Kain, Karen Anne Lemmert, Marie Ringwald, S. Denise Tassin and Sarah E. Wood - all take as a starting point the idea that our impression of space is a continuous and delicate negotiation between present perception and remembered sensations.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
Norman Meadow's commentary promoting nuclear power over wind energy as a solution to climate change leaves out serious unsolved problems that wind does not present ("Nuclear blows away wind," Feb. 1). Huge piles of highly radioactive waste are sitting all over the world in vulnerable spent fuel pools lacking containment structures or backup generators. The Japanese government was considering an evacuation of Tokyo in the event of an explosion at one. As we expand our reliance on nuclear power, we also expand this Achilles heel of the nuclear industry.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
Tom Horton's op-ed in praise of Norman Meadows and nuclear power presented inaccuracies ("Time for greens to embrace nukes," May 22). Climate change is a crisis that necessitates phasing out fossil fuels, but relying on nuclear power to replace them is neither possible nor safe. Nuclear, like wind, does need backup. Last week 20 of the 104 plants in the U.S. were at zero production including: Calvert Cliffs reactor offline twice this month with malfunctioning steam valves initially; Harris in Raleigh, weakness in vessel head, out since May 15; Palisades, leaking storage tanks, out since May 5th ; San Onofre's two reactors, premature tube wear, out for over a year; Fort Calhoun, safety violation since flooding, out since April, 2011.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
Norman Meadow's commentary promoting nuclear power over wind energy as a solution to climate change leaves out serious unsolved problems that wind does not present ("Nuclear blows away wind," Feb. 1). Huge piles of highly radioactive waste are sitting all over the world in vulnerable spent fuel pools lacking containment structures or backup generators. The Japanese government was considering an evacuation of Tokyo in the event of an explosion at one. As we expand our reliance on nuclear power, we also expand this Achilles heel of the nuclear industry.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | September 6, 2011
Don't worry, the folks who operate nuclear power plants near Baltimore told us after a Japanese earthquake caused meltdowns and large radioactivity releases there. We don't have severe earthquakes on the East Coast. That proposition got tested Aug. 23, when the 5.8-magnitude quake centered in Virginia rattled buildings as far north as Toronto. The closest nuclear plant to Baltimore is Exelon Corp.'s Peach Bottom facility on the Susquehanna River, 45 miles away. Peach Bottom is built to withstand ground movement equal to an earthquake registering 6.1 on the Richter scale, Exelon said in April, after the Japan catastrophe.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 20, 2011
Here where we live, far from Fukushima, we go about our business. The amygdala, the part of the human brain that worries about things, is not conditioned to worry about earthquakes and tsunamis in the Mid-Atlantic. We might worry about a snowstorm when the meteorologists issue a warning and the TV news operations go into panic mode. We worry about the effect of a tropical storm or an occasional hurricane; heavy rains create anxiety about the soundness of our roofs and basement walls.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 27, 2011
I received general absolution at the Church of the Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Middletown, Pa., on the Sunday after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident. It was April Fool's Day, but everyone was as serious as sin when the priest stood on the altar and, with the authority granted by William H. Keeler — then the bishop of Harrisburg, later the cardinal of Baltimore — absolved all contrite Catholics within his gaze. At that moment, three days after the accident, no one could guarantee that the nuclear reactor down the road would not blow up. So, with our souls at risk, the priest absolved us of sin — just in case he wasn't around to hear our confessions before we all succumbed.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
After reading Dan Rodricks ' "Despite tragedy, nuclear still way to go" (March 27), I am gratified that there are still thoughtful editorials and letters to the editor in support of nuclear power, despite the situation in Japan. Having had almost everything possible thrown at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, there are still no deaths connected to the damaged reactors, proving again that nuclear power generation is the safest form of energy known to date. Yet thanks to a not always benevolent Mother Nature, thousands of people are dead or injured, and the majority of media coverage has diverted national attention away from the Japanese people's needs and suffering to focus on the "nuclear disaster.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | September 6, 2011
Don't worry, the folks who operate nuclear power plants near Baltimore told us after a Japanese earthquake caused meltdowns and large radioactivity releases there. We don't have severe earthquakes on the East Coast. That proposition got tested Aug. 23, when the 5.8-magnitude quake centered in Virginia rattled buildings as far north as Toronto. The closest nuclear plant to Baltimore is Exelon Corp.'s Peach Bottom facility on the Susquehanna River, 45 miles away. Peach Bottom is built to withstand ground movement equal to an earthquake registering 6.1 on the Richter scale, Exelon said in April, after the Japan catastrophe.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 27, 2011
I received general absolution at the Church of the Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Middletown, Pa., on the Sunday after the Three Mile Island nuclear accident. It was April Fool's Day, but everyone was as serious as sin when the priest stood on the altar and, with the authority granted by William H. Keeler — then the bishop of Harrisburg, later the cardinal of Baltimore — absolved all contrite Catholics within his gaze. At that moment, three days after the accident, no one could guarantee that the nuclear reactor down the road would not blow up. So, with our souls at risk, the priest absolved us of sin — just in case he wasn't around to hear our confessions before we all succumbed.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 20, 2011
Here where we live, far from Fukushima, we go about our business. The amygdala, the part of the human brain that worries about things, is not conditioned to worry about earthquakes and tsunamis in the Mid-Atlantic. We might worry about a snowstorm when the meteorologists issue a warning and the TV news operations go into panic mode. We worry about the effect of a tropical storm or an occasional hurricane; heavy rains create anxiety about the soundness of our roofs and basement walls.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 18, 2003
A thumbnail history of Western art since the Renaissance might be described as an obsession with space - how it is imagined, depicted, experienced and remembered. The show at Maryland Art Place through Saturday touches intriguingly on the latter: The mental trace that is imprinted, however imperfectly, on our brains as the memory of a place. The nine artists in the show - Barry Bartlett, William Christenberry, Mary Douglas, Ken Fukushima, Brian Kain, Karen Anne Lemmert, Marie Ringwald, S. Denise Tassin and Sarah E. Wood - all take as a starting point the idea that our impression of space is a continuous and delicate negotiation between present perception and remembered sensations.
NEWS
February 28, 2000
Eliot A. Caplin, 86, a writer who devised the plots for a number of well-known comic strips, died Feb. 20 in Stockbridge, Mass. He cooperated with artists who produced strips such as "Heart of Juliet Jones," "Big Ben Bolt" and "Dr. Bobbs." He was the brother of "L'il Abner" cartoonist Al Capp. Although the brothers never collaborated on a strip, Mr. Capp conceived two strips that he passed along to Mr. Caplin. One, "Abbie an' Slats," drawn by Raeburn van Buren, lasted 23 years. The other was "Long Sam," drawn by Bob Lubbers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2003
TOKYO - Judging by the warnings of the electricity company here in the world's largest city, this will be a summer unlike all others, with severe power shortages and blackouts predicted. Industry officials hedge these alarming forecasts with one big "if." The Tokyo Electric Power Co., or Tepco, says it will be able to keep its customers' tempers from boiling over only if it is allowed to press 16 nuclear power plants back into operation. The plants were temporarily taken out of service last year after a scandal over falsified inspections and poor maintenance.
NEWS
March 22, 2011
Thank you for the article on nuclear plant safety in this country ("Should we worry about nuclear plants here?" March 20). As you point out, the Peach Bottom Reactor shares the same boiling water reactor design as the Daiichi plants. Calvert Cliffs is not a boiling water reactor. (It is a pressurized water reactor, as was Three Mile Island.) It is also only 3-4 miles from the largest liquid natural gas terminal in the United States. A huge fire at the terminal might have very serious consequences down the road.
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