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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
The state government's lengthy search for a vendor to supply a new generation of telephone switching equipment is expected to end today when the Board of Public Works votes on a recommendation to award an $11.7 million contract to a subsidiary of GTE Corp.The apparent victory by GTE represents a reversal for Bell Atlantic Meridian Systems, which won the five-year contract in bidding last year only to be disqualified by the Maryland State Board of Contract Appeals. After an appeal by Fujitsu Business Communications Systems, the appeals board ruled in September that the original bidding process was marred by numerous flaws and ordered the state to choose a winner from among the remaining bidders.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
Richard C. "Dick" D'Agostino, former Baltimore Sun design director who later worked for Fujitsu Consulting in New York City, died Monday of heart failure at his Roland Park home. He was 64. Richard Compton D'Agostino, whose father had been manager of the old Alcazar Hotel and whose mother was a registered nurse, was born and raised in Pikesville. Mr. D'Agostino, who had planned to become a priest, was a 1966 graduate of St. Albert's Junior Seminary in Middletown, N.Y. In 1970, he earned a degree in philosophy from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
The state Department of General Services won its case before the Maryland State Board of Contract Appeals, and attorney John Thornton was outraged."It's a ridiculous decision," he fumed yesterday. "It's wrong on the law and wrong on the facts."Sore loser? No, Mr. Thornton was the winner.In a ruling that puzzled both sides, the semi-judicial appeals board on Wednesday upheld the General Services Department's decision to go back to square one in the bidding for a controversial state telephone contract worth an estimated $20 million.
NEWS
By Nora Koch and Nora Koch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2001
When the world's third-largest information technology company looked to expand its U.S. research operations to the East Coast, the usual high-profile and prestigious universities were in the running. But the Japanese-owned Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. settled on a new university player in the high-tech research world. University of Maryland, College Park beat out three more celebrated contenders - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Princeton University and Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University - as site of the Fujitsu facility, which opened April 1. Just a few years ago, College Park likely would have been passed up as site of a major technology firm such as Fujitsu.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1993
Fujitsu aims for piece of video game marketTOKYO -- Japan's Fujitsu announced last week a keyboard-less personal computer that plugs into a television set, in an attempt to woo computer-shy users to multimedia gadgets and grab a piece of the booming video game market.Half game machine and half computer, the "FM Towns MARTY" will run software recorded on compact discs.The operator puts his hands on a molded rest, which has a button under each finger, instead of the traditional alphanumeric keyboard.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1993
Donna Karan delays shares' saleDonna Karan Co., the high-flying designer apparel business, said yesterday that it was postponing its plans to sell 11 million common shares to the public, confirming speculation that the much-ballyhooed offering would not take place this year."
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | March 30, 1998
THE MOST personal thing remaining in the world of personal computing is the portable computer. With "desktop" machines so bland that we typically hide them under the desk, choosing a favorite screen saver or cartoon assistant is about as personal as things get. That makes the notebook machine the last bastion of individuality. Screens, keyboards, pointing devices and the size, shape and color of the machines themselves march to the beat of a different tinny speaker.Major manufacturers offer full-fledged Windows models with the features most people need for $1,500 to $1,700.
NEWS
By Nora Koch and Nora Koch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2001
When the world's third-largest information technology company looked to expand its U.S. research operations to the East Coast, the usual high-profile and prestigious universities were in the running. But the Japanese-owned Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. settled on a new university player in the high-tech research world. University of Maryland, College Park beat out three more celebrated contenders - Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Princeton University and Pittsburgh's Carnegie Mellon University - as site of the Fujitsu facility, which opened April 1. Just a few years ago, College Park likely would have been passed up as site of a major technology firm such as Fujitsu.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
Richard C. "Dick" D'Agostino, former Baltimore Sun design director who later worked for Fujitsu Consulting in New York City, died Monday of heart failure at his Roland Park home. He was 64. Richard Compton D'Agostino, whose father had been manager of the old Alcazar Hotel and whose mother was a registered nurse, was born and raised in Pikesville. Mr. D'Agostino, who had planned to become a priest, was a 1966 graduate of St. Albert's Junior Seminary in Middletown, N.Y. In 1970, he earned a degree in philosophy from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
Bookham Technology PLC, a British fiber-optics company that is opening its North American headquarters in Howard County, said yesterday that it made a multimillion-dollar deal with Fujitsu Telecommunications Europe Ltd. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Bookham announced that it would supply up to 10,000 pieces of equipment to Fujitsu each month this year. Bookham makes telecommunications components that help information flow along fiber-optic networks. With headquarters in Oxfordshire, England, Book- ham announced plans last month to open a North American headquarters and manufacturing plant in Columbia that is expected to eventually employ 1,000.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | March 30, 1998
THE MOST personal thing remaining in the world of personal computing is the portable computer. With "desktop" machines so bland that we typically hide them under the desk, choosing a favorite screen saver or cartoon assistant is about as personal as things get. That makes the notebook machine the last bastion of individuality. Screens, keyboards, pointing devices and the size, shape and color of the machines themselves march to the beat of a different tinny speaker.Major manufacturers offer full-fledged Windows models with the features most people need for $1,500 to $1,700.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
The state government's lengthy search for a vendor to supply a new generation of telephone switching equipment is expected to end today when the Board of Public Works votes on a recommendation to award an $11.7 million contract to a subsidiary of GTE Corp.The apparent victory by GTE represents a reversal for Bell Atlantic Meridian Systems, which won the five-year contract in bidding last year only to be disqualified by the Maryland State Board of Contract Appeals. After an appeal by Fujitsu Business Communications Systems, the appeals board ruled in September that the original bidding process was marred by numerous flaws and ordered the state to choose a winner from among the remaining bidders.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
The state Department of General Services won its case before the Maryland State Board of Contract Appeals, and attorney John Thornton was outraged."It's a ridiculous decision," he fumed yesterday. "It's wrong on the law and wrong on the facts."Sore loser? No, Mr. Thornton was the winner.In a ruling that puzzled both sides, the semi-judicial appeals board on Wednesday upheld the General Services Department's decision to go back to square one in the bidding for a controversial state telephone contract worth an estimated $20 million.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1993
Donna Karan delays shares' saleDonna Karan Co., the high-flying designer apparel business, said yesterday that it was postponing its plans to sell 11 million common shares to the public, confirming speculation that the much-ballyhooed offering would not take place this year."
BUSINESS
February 22, 1993
Fujitsu aims for piece of video game marketTOKYO -- Japan's Fujitsu announced last week a keyboard-less personal computer that plugs into a television set, in an attempt to woo computer-shy users to multimedia gadgets and grab a piece of the booming video game market.Half game machine and half computer, the "FM Towns MARTY" will run software recorded on compact discs.The operator puts his hands on a molded rest, which has a button under each finger, instead of the traditional alphanumeric keyboard.
NEWS
August 19, 2001
U.S. Navy holds major exercise in South China Sea HONG KONG - The U.S. Navy held an unusually large exercise in the South China Sea, three days before sending a battle group into Hong Kong for a port call. There was no immediate response from the Chinese government to the drill Friday by two U.S. aircraft carrier battle groups - described by the U.S. Navy as a "rare meeting at sea" - but one defense analyst said yesterday that it was a show of force to China. VW workers in Mexico strike for pay increase MEXICO CITY - Workers at Volkswagen AG's Mexico plant walked off the job yesterday, bringing a halt to the German automaker's production of the new Beetle, which it exports to 80 countries.
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