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NEWS
April 15, 1995
The most unlikely national leader in the hemisphere is vindicated. Decisively re-elected to a second term in the nearly-complete election count, and with nearly a majority in the congress against a fragmented opposition, President Alberto K. Fujimori of Peru will rise in the councils of the Americas. Perhaps U.S. agencies should listen more and advise less when the subject is guerrilla eradication, runaway inflation, alienated peasantry or Andean cocaine production.The second-generation Japanese-Peruvian technocrat is like no previous statesman of the Americas.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
A Japanese firm that has a long history with Baltimore-based Hedwin Corp. was named the winning bidder for the manufacturer in a bankruptcy auction Friday, a development that Hedwin officials said would save the company's 300 jobs. Fujimori Kogyo Co. offered $22.2 million after just over two hours of bidding, up from its initial bid of $16.5 million. A team from rival bidder Inteplast Group, a New Jersey maker of plastic products, huddled in another room for five minutes and returned to bow out. "Inteplast has decided not to bid further in this auction," said Arthur E. Rosenberg, an attorney for the company.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 4, 2006
SANTIAGO, Chile -- The government of Peru formally requested yesterday that Chile extradite former President Alberto Fujimori, who ruled Peru during the 1990s and has been held in custody here ever since he unexpectedly arrived two months ago from exile in Japan. Fujimori, 67, is wanted in Peru on more than a dozen counts of corruption and violating human rights. The accusations range from bearing the responsibility for death squad killings and unauthorized wiretaps to paying bribes and siphoning money from government ministries.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 22, 2007
SANTIAGO, Chile -- Chile's Supreme Court approved yesterday the extradition of Peru's former president, Alberto K. Fujimori, on charges of human rights abuses and corruption related to his time in power during the 1990s. The ruling, which cannot be appealed, could set an important international precedent for extradition cases of former heads of state wanted for atrocities, according to human rights advocates. After the ruling, Fujimori, 69, could be transported to Peru as early as next week, Chilean government officials said.
NEWS
By Larry Birns and Julie Dasenbrock | September 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Despite his recent proclamation to the contrary, the reign of Peru's unscrupulous President Alberto Fujimori could be far from over. Hopefully, the strongman's reputation for being disingenuous will cast a healthy skepticism on his recent call for new elections (in which he professes he will not run) and keep the international community wary of his intentions. Such acts of selfless patriotism have been a rarity in his public life. With a record of dissolving Congress, violating international human rights standards with impunity and trampling his personally inspired constitution, he has given Latin America's brand of democracy a bad name.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | April 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States halted aid to Peru last night to pressure President Alberto K. Fujimori into reversing his sudden assumption of dictatorial powers.Mr. Fujimori and the Peruvian military closed radio stations and magazines, detained opposition figures and placed legislative leaders under house arrest yesterday after suspending the constitution late Sunday. The prime minister resigned and was replaced. Justice and labor ministers also resigned.The seizure of total control by Mr. Fujimori and the military marked the third serious threat to democracy in the hemisphere since autumn, when Haiti's military ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who remains in exile.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 2000
LIMA, Peru - The Peruvian Congress received President Alberto Fujimori's formal resignation yesterday, setting off a flurry of maneuvering by congressional leaders to decide who will succeed him and oversee the transition to new elections. A day of back-door negotiations led to the resignation of Second Vice President Ricardo Marquez, Fujimori's hand-picked successor, making it likely that the opposition will take over the government by the end of the week. But it was still possible that another former Fujimori aide could rise to administer the transition toward new presidential elections in April.
NEWS
July 19, 1997
PRESIDENT Alberto Fujimori had a 67 percent approval rating in a Peruvian opinion poll after his firmness and soldiers' professionalism ended the terrorist occupation of Japan's embassy in April. People admire a strong man who restores law and order. That approval rating sank to 23 percent in recent days after a scandal of government spying drove cabinet ministers to resign. People fear and oppose a strong man who undermines law and order.President Fujimori's authoritarian streak has had successes since his surprise election in 1990, defeating the terrorist movements that had been destroying Peruvian society, restoring personal safety, ending rampant inflation and attracting foreign investment.
NEWS
By HOUSTON CHRONICLE | September 20, 2000
LIMA, Peru - President Alberto K. Fujimori rejected calls for his resignation last night and defiantly declared that he would remain in power until next year despite a bribery scandal that has rocked his government. "I continue to govern. I'm the president of the republic. I have not resigned," Fujimori said at a news conference at the National Palace. Critics have insisted that Peru's political crisis, which was sparked last week by a bribery scandal involving the president's top aide, Vladimiro Montesinos, is so dire that Fujimori should step down immediately and make way for a transition government that would rule until a new vote can be held.
NEWS
April 24, 1997
PRESIDENT ALBERTO FUJIMORI has earned the gratitude of law-abiding people everywhere -- not just in his own country -- for daring to use force to end a hostage-taking siege, the likes of which should not be tolerated by any government worthy of the name. His patience, his guile, his refusal to give in to the demands of terrorists culminated in a lightning strike that secured the freedom and saved the lives of 71 of 72 hostages held captive for four months at the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 4, 2006
SANTIAGO, Chile -- The government of Peru formally requested yesterday that Chile extradite former President Alberto Fujimori, who ruled Peru during the 1990s and has been held in custody here ever since he unexpectedly arrived two months ago from exile in Japan. Fujimori, 67, is wanted in Peru on more than a dozen counts of corruption and violating human rights. The accusations range from bearing the responsibility for death squad killings and unauthorized wiretaps to paying bribes and siphoning money from government ministries.
TOPIC
February 23, 2003
The World Opening a new front in the war against terrorism, the United States said it will send about 2,000 troops to the Philippines to fight Muslim extremists in the southern part of the country. Turkey demanded a $32 billion aid package from the United States for its participation in a war against Iraq, about $6 billion more than the United States has offered. Fire raced through two packed subway trains in South Korea after a man ignited a carton filled with flammable material, killing about 120 people and injuring 135, officials said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 9, 2001
TOKYO - Japan, after pledging more than $1 billion to the United Nations to support the care and feeding of Afghan refugees, is closing its doors to nine Afghan citizens seeking asylum from brutal Taliban rule. The nine, who separately stole away to Japan by ship or plane after family members had been murdered by Taliban soldiers, were rounded up by immigration authorities Oct. 3 and questioned under the pretense that they might be terrorists. Now immigration officials insist that the nine, most of them ethnic Hazara who have been persecuted by the Taliban, should be denied asylum and sent back to Afghanistan.
NEWS
June 29, 2001
IF VLADIMIRO Montesinos had not sent a retired Venezuelan intelligence officer to Miami to pluck $38 million in laundered money from a more or less nonexistent offshore bank, he might still be holed up in Caracas. Instead, Peru's former security chief is in a secure prison he had built within a naval base to hold the nation's six most-feared terrorists and felons. He is being questioned by six judges about 52 court cases and 140 investigations implicating 553 people in alleged drug money laundering, embezzlement, corruption, arms smuggling, drug trafficking, extortion and murder.
NEWS
June 5, 2001
THE CLEANEST election in years gives crisis-ravaged Peru the democratic new start it desperately needs. Alejandro Toledo looks like a 15th century Inca ruler. As a boy he shined shoes to help his large family. Then he earned a doctorate at Stanford and became a World Bank economist. Then he ran for president against the elected dictator, Alberto Fujimori, and quit the runoff crying fraud, which was probably true. A year later, and seven months after Mr. Fujimori fled to Japan, leaving his corrupt enforcer, Vladimiro Montesinos, a fugitive, Mr. Toledo tried again.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 22, 2000
Fujimori is an extinct volcano in the Andes. Don't shoot the vote counters. They are doing their best. Remember when "the long count" meant the second Dempsey-Tunney fight of 1927? The University of Maryland, College Park did what any great research university does under severe stress. It fired the football coach. Lucille Clifton for president!
NEWS
December 24, 1996
TUPAC AMARU, the last Inca, rebelled against his Spanish captors and was beheaded in 1572. Two centuries later, an Indian who ignited rebellion in the Andes took the name Tupac Amaru II, before his own execution. Two centuries later, in 1984, middle-class Peruvian Marxists inspired by Fidel Castro in Cuba formed the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement (MRTA). The name connoted undying rebellion and lost causes.No one noticed. A larger, more murderous, mad Maoist movement called Shining Path was destroying the country.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 22, 2007
SANTIAGO, Chile -- Chile's Supreme Court approved yesterday the extradition of Peru's former president, Alberto K. Fujimori, on charges of human rights abuses and corruption related to his time in power during the 1990s. The ruling, which cannot be appealed, could set an important international precedent for extradition cases of former heads of state wanted for atrocities, according to human rights advocates. After the ruling, Fujimori, 69, could be transported to Peru as early as next week, Chilean government officials said.
NEWS
November 21, 2000
ALBERTO Fujimori could have retired after two terms, 10 years, as president of Peru, a great historical figure in his country. He insisted on staying too long, until his defects came to define him. Now that he has sent a resignation notice from Japan, Peruvians can reflect on what it means. Getting the autocrat out and depriving his shadowy enforcer of power are half the struggle. More important is what comes next. If Peru holds free and fair elections in April, and if a transitional regime is established with broad acceptance until then, this abrupt end to Fujimori rule was worth it. A little-known but respected academic when he won election in a country drowning in anarchy and poverty, Mr. Fujimori vanquished two tyrannical insurgencies, a hostage crisis, a coup, runaway inflation and a moribund economy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 2000
LIMA, Peru - The Peruvian Congress received President Alberto Fujimori's formal resignation yesterday, setting off a flurry of maneuvering by congressional leaders to decide who will succeed him and oversee the transition to new elections. A day of back-door negotiations led to the resignation of Second Vice President Ricardo Marquez, Fujimori's hand-picked successor, making it likely that the opposition will take over the government by the end of the week. But it was still possible that another former Fujimori aide could rise to administer the transition toward new presidential elections in April.
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