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By KATHRYN HIGHAM and KATHRYN HIGHAM,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1999
There's nothing quite like impeccable sushi, and we found it at Fuji in Ellicott City. Long cuts of deep-red tuna belly and coral-pink salmon were draped over nuggets of seasoned sushi rice like dancers in a deep bow. The fish was so fresh it tasted like satin on the tongue. Sushi is just part of the authentic Japanese experience at Fuji, opened in 1992 by Asatoshi Takamine, sushi chef and owner. Step inside this tiny suburban storefront through a curtain of decorative banners and you'll find a traditional raised seating area, where you can eat cross-legged on the floor.
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NEWS
January 20, 2012
The bankruptcy filing of Eastman Kodak Company this week marked the end of a chapter in American manufacturing history. The venerable corporation that gave the world the Brownie camera and the slogan "You push the button, we do the rest" once dominated the photographic world with its inexpensive cameras and amazing variety of amateur and professional films. But by the end of last year it was rapidly running out of cash, its market share had plunged, and its stock was selling for just 54 cents a share.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Fuji Photo Film, citing "glaring flaws" in an annual U.S. review of foreign trade barriers, yesterday renewed its call for a neutral fact-finding mechanism to resolve allegations that Japan's market for photographic film isn't open to foreign competition.A National Trade Estimate report released this week "provides a one-sided picture of market conditions in Japan," Fuji Film lawyer Bill Barringer said in a letter delivered to U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor.The NTE report is based entirely on the "uncritical acceptance of Kodak's allegations rather than any objective investigation of hotly disputed facts," Mr. Barringer said in his letter to Mr. Kantor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to the Sun | July 17, 2008
Fuji San is an agreeable, little, 10-table Thai restaurant. It doesn't give much in the way of ambience and, in return, it doesn't ask much of its customers. It's a good option for a hot summer night when you feel like getting out of the house but don't want to invest too much energy into dressing up or feel like performing the role of Mr. and Mrs. Restaurant Patron. It completes the sentence, "You know what, babe, let's just go to _____." Open now for about 2 1/2 years, Fuji San is the fourth and newest restaurant in the Sesum family's modest empire, which includes Thai One On/San Sushi Too in Towson and a similarly named and themed hybrid restaurant in Canton.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | October 28, 1996
ISN'T IT TIME you went down to Ritz Camera with that film of the kids at Hershey Park last summer? You get double prints -- great for Grandma! -- for about $11.80 if you're in Ritz's Frequent Photo Club.Plus, you get to be a bit player in some of the best theater that international trade has to offer.Your double prints will come back on paper made by Fuji Photo Film Co. Ritz, based in Beltsville with 560 stores, fired Eastman Kodak Co. as its paper supplier three weeks ago and signed an exclusive pact with Fuji.
NEWS
January 20, 2012
The bankruptcy filing of Eastman Kodak Company this week marked the end of a chapter in American manufacturing history. The venerable corporation that gave the world the Brownie camera and the slogan "You push the button, we do the rest" once dominated the photographic world with its inexpensive cameras and amazing variety of amateur and professional films. But by the end of last year it was rapidly running out of cash, its market share had plunged, and its stock was selling for just 54 cents a share.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could open a new trade rift with Japan, the Clinton administration announced yesterday that would investigate charges by Eastman Kodak Co. that rival Fuji Photo Film had conspired to deny it fair access to the Japanese market over the last 20 years.The American action, coming less than a week after the countries pulled back from the brink of sanctions and settled a bitter automotive trade dispute, was based on a 275-page complaint filed by Kodak in mid-May, contending that the Japanese government had helped Fuji create an anti-competitive market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
Snapping digital images and immediately showing them to their delighted subjects has led many a photo enthusiast to switch from a film camera to a digital. But printing photographs at home was never an easy proposition with film cameras and it hasn't been a particularly enjoyable task for digital camera owners either - despite the low cost of some photo inkjet printers and the availability of image-editing programs. According to a study by camera maker Fuji, while digital camera ownership continues to climb, users want easier ways to turn their electronic images into prints.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Eastman Kodak Co. asked the Commerce Department late yesterday to impose steep tariffs on imported paper and chemicals for color-film processing, a step that could result in higher film-processing prices in the United States.The case is the first major one in which a U.S. company argues that a Japanese competitor should raise its prices here to reflect the steady rise of the Japanese yen against the dollar. Trade experts say that other U.S. companies, including automakers, are now deciding whether to file similar cases against their Japanese competitors.
BUSINESS
By Samantha Kappalman | November 16, 1997
Eastman Kodak Co. announced last week that it cut 10,000 jobs and chopped $150 million off its research budget -- the latest in a string of restructurings that have yet to boost profit or market share.The cost-cutting -- $1 billion over two years -- is a response to stiff competition from Japan's Fuji, which has undercut Kodak's film and processing-paper business, and continuing steep losses its digital photography products.The measures are the most drastic yet by George M. C. Fisher, the former Motorola chief executive who was brought in four years ago to rejuvenate the 113-year-old company.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES | December 4, 2005
I need an English-speaking guide who will just take me up Mount Fuji in Japan. Every company I have found has the climb as part of a larger package. Mount Fuji, the 12,388-foot volcanic mountain about two hours' drive southwest of Tokyo, is open to climbers during July and August. An estimated 200,000 people make the ascent then. JTB Sunrise Tours (800-235-3523; jtbusa.com), offers an overnight climb accompanied by a tour coordinator, mountain guide and English-speaking assistant. The tour departs from Hotel Keio Plaza Tokyo and travels by bus to about 7,545 feet up the mountain.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 13, 2003
Towson is the closest thing the Baltimore area has to a Little Japan, what with all the sushi places and Japanese restaurants that have opened up there in the last few years. Add one more to the list: the new Fuji, which is a low-key, family-run neighborhood version of the popular hibachi grill restaurants. I, for one, found it restful. Most of these slice-and-dice-while-you-watch Japanese steakhouses are high energy -- and pricey. At Fuji, you get the same show on a smaller scale and much the same food; but it's quieter, cozier and less expensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
Snapping digital images and immediately showing them to their delighted subjects has led many a photo enthusiast to switch from a film camera to a digital. But printing photographs at home was never an easy proposition with film cameras and it hasn't been a particularly enjoyable task for digital camera owners either - despite the low cost of some photo inkjet printers and the availability of image-editing programs. According to a study by camera maker Fuji, while digital camera ownership continues to climb, users want easier ways to turn their electronic images into prints.
FEATURES
By PETER JENSEN and PETER JENSEN,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
Ask Steve Weber of Weber's Cider Mill Farm for his favorite apple, and it's like a kid in a candy shop -- he can't say no. "I don't think there's a whole lot around that beats a Jonathan," says Weber, a third-geneeration apple seller from Parkville. But then he adds: "I like Cortlands as they come in. I like Jonagold. I like Golden Delicious, Stayman, Winesap and Fuji -- oh, the Fuji has incredible sugar." After that, he's all over the place. "Northern Spy for pies. Now, there's an apple that does incredibly well in the oven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KATHRYN HIGHAM and KATHRYN HIGHAM,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1999
There's nothing quite like impeccable sushi, and we found it at Fuji in Ellicott City. Long cuts of deep-red tuna belly and coral-pink salmon were draped over nuggets of seasoned sushi rice like dancers in a deep bow. The fish was so fresh it tasted like satin on the tongue. Sushi is just part of the authentic Japanese experience at Fuji, opened in 1992 by Asatoshi Takamine, sushi chef and owner. Step inside this tiny suburban storefront through a curtain of decorative banners and you'll find a traditional raised seating area, where you can eat cross-legged on the floor.
BUSINESS
By Samantha Kappalman | November 16, 1997
Eastman Kodak Co. announced last week that it cut 10,000 jobs and chopped $150 million off its research budget -- the latest in a string of restructurings that have yet to boost profit or market share.The cost-cutting -- $1 billion over two years -- is a response to stiff competition from Japan's Fuji, which has undercut Kodak's film and processing-paper business, and continuing steep losses its digital photography products.The measures are the most drastic yet by George M. C. Fisher, the former Motorola chief executive who was brought in four years ago to rejuvenate the 113-year-old company.
BUSINESS
By OPINIONS ON STOCKS OFFERED BY INVESTMENT EXPERTS.COMPILED BY STEVE HALPERN FOR KNIGHT RIDDER | July 3, 1991
Fuji Photo Film"One Japanese firm stands out as first rate -- Fuji Photo Film (OTC, FUJIY, around $50)," says Richard Band's Profitable Investing."The stock trades at about 16 times this year's estimated earnings, which is way below the average Tokyo stock and lower than many U.S. blue chips with similar growth prospects. Fuji has quadrupled its sales and profits over the past decade. In America, the company has doubled its market share over the past seven years . . . Our goal for the stock is a double in price by 1994."
FEATURES
By PETER JENSEN and PETER JENSEN,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
Ask Steve Weber of Weber's Cider Mill Farm for his favorite apple, and it's like a kid in a candy shop -- he can't say no. "I don't think there's a whole lot around that beats a Jonathan," says Weber, a third-geneeration apple seller from Parkville. But then he adds: "I like Cortlands as they come in. I like Jonagold. I like Golden Delicious, Stayman, Winesap and Fuji -- oh, the Fuji has incredible sugar." After that, he's all over the place. "Northern Spy for pies. Now, there's an apple that does incredibly well in the oven.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 16, 1997
ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- Eastman Kodak Co. yesterday said it will report lower earnings for the third quarter and year as archrival Fuji Photo Film Co. steals more of the U.S. photographic film market, forcing it to eliminate money-losing units.Kodak said its third-quarter profit will be significantly less than a year ago if business in September doesn't improve from a weak July and August. For the year, operating profit could be as much as 25 percent below last year's results.The third straight drop in quarterly profit will give Chairman and Chief Executive George Fisher the political muscle to make the cuts at the tradition-bound company he should have made years ago, analysts said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | October 28, 1996
ISN'T IT TIME you went down to Ritz Camera with that film of the kids at Hershey Park last summer? You get double prints -- great for Grandma! -- for about $11.80 if you're in Ritz's Frequent Photo Club.Plus, you get to be a bit player in some of the best theater that international trade has to offer.Your double prints will come back on paper made by Fuji Photo Film Co. Ritz, based in Beltsville with 560 stores, fired Eastman Kodak Co. as its paper supplier three weeks ago and signed an exclusive pact with Fuji.
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