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By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer Staff writer Ian Johnson contributed to this article | January 7, 1994
A year ago, after Baltimore native Reginald Lewis died and his half-brother, Jean S. Fugett Jr., was tapped to lead TLC Beatrice International Holdings Inc., a local politician praised Mr. Fugett's qualifications, but added a note of caution:"If after six months or a year the company is not making progress as it should, then the shareholders I'm sure will have something to say about it," predicted state Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr.It took...
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NEWS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
The bond between Barney Ehrmann and Reggie Fugett began as 5-year-old Gilman first-graders - not long after they heard their names read aloud within seconds of each other during the roll call. "We were always in the same, all-day homeroom, and in a lot of the same classes over the next few years until we were in like fourth grade," said Fugett, 17, adding that he and Ehrmann often paired off during social events and down time around the kindergarten-through-12th grade, all-boys private school campus.
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NEWS
By Newsday | January 6, 1994
NEW YORK -- Jean S. Fugett Jr., hand-picked by his late half-brother, Reginald Lewis, to succeed him as chairman and chief executive officer of TLC Beatrice International Food, resigned from both posts yesterday.Loida Nicholas Lewis, Mr. Lewis' widow, will take over as chairwoman of the nation's largest black-owned business Feb. 1 after being elected to the post by the company's board of directors. TLC Beatrice will begin a search for a new chief executive. Mr. Fugett will remain in that position until a successor is named.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | September 18, 2005
NOT THE LEAST of the buzz at the gala June opening of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture came from the reappearance of Jean S. Fugett Jr., former NFL tight end, former CEO of TLC Beatrice, half-brother of Reg Lewis and once one of Baltimore's most prominent sons. "Where have you been?" everybody asked, as Fugett cruised through the atrium in a tux. "Yeah, Jean, I thought you were in Paris. I didn't know you were back in Baltimore. ... What HAVE you been doing?"
SPORTS
By John Steadman | July 7, 1993
The NAACP's earlier endorsement of Charlotte, N.C., over Baltimore as the preferred site for NFL expansion resulted in an understated reaction from the governor. He called it a "slap in the face." It was more of a painful kick to another part of the anatomy.Regardless of the apologies or explanations that follow, the damage is done. The NAACP action got the attention of the entire country, along with the offices of the NFL. A correction will not eradicate the inadvertent harm dealt to Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | February 16, 1993
Jean Fugett, who entered the State of Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame yesterday, is a man who seemingly can do just about anything.When he was a 16-year-old senior at Cardinal Gibbons High School here,he told coach Bob Patzwall he wanted to come out for football."
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
Baltimore businessman Harvey "Bud" Meyerhoff yesterday joined a group trying to buy the Orioles, while Jean S. Fugett Jr., head of another group, was deciding whether to bid for the club.Meyerhoff has joined a group led by Cincinnati businessman William O. DeWitt Jr. that is attempting to buy the team from owner Eli S. Jacobs.Meyerhoff, chairman of a Baltimore-based investment company, Magna Holdings Inc., and former chairman of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial, has been in talks with the DeWitt group for several months, and decided to join it recently, DeWitt said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
Jean S. Fugett hasn't bought the Orioles or even submitted a bid for the baseball team.But Fugett, whose credentials include heading the world's largest black-owned company and playing in the NFL, is emerging as a key figure in the sale of the Baltimore baseball team.Recently, two competing groups of investors have met with Fugett, seeking to persuade the Baltimore-born businessman and lawyer to abandon his bid for the Orioles and to join as a partner in their efforts.Last month, William O. DeWitt Jr. flew to France to meet with him while Fugett attended a meeting of his international food company, TLC Beatrice International Holdings Inc.Fugett also met in New York recently with Baltimore lawyer Peter G. Angelos, who leads a group of Maryland investors trying to buy the team.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Ian Johnson and Kim Clark and Ian Johnson,Staff Writers | January 31, 1993
Jean S. Fugett Jr. was a big, nice kid. Too nice, the football coach at Cardinal Gibbons High School thought.So when the 6-foot-3-inch, 230-pound senior asked for a tryout, Coach Robert Patzwall told him not to bother. "I told him he wasn't tough enough to play football, and I wasn't kidding," Mr. Patzwall said.Mr. Patzwall was wrong. Mr. Fugett never turned into one of those "nasty kids" who enjoy knocking players down on the field, but he was plenty tough, Mr. Patzwall recalled.The speedy tight end led the high school team to a 7-1-1 record.
SPORTS
By Marc Bouchard and Marc Bouchard,Contributing Writer | February 14, 1993
The official state sport of jousting will gain its first inductee into the State of Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame when Mary Lou Bartram is enshrined with three others at a luncheon tomorrow at Martin's West.Joining Bartram as new Hall of Fame members will be former professional football players Arthur "Otts" Brandau and Jean Fugett, and tennis star Pam Shriver. The new inductees will raise the total number of members in the Hall to 152.Bartram, a native of Sparrows Point, is the only woman to win the national jousting championship (1971 and 1982)
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 16, 2005
For three of the women who loved him most, Reginald F. Lewis' presence is everywhere in Baltimore's newest museum - and not just because his name is emblazoned high on its polished black granite facade. The $34 million Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture is brand new - it officially opens to visitors June 25. But a tour yesterday is a trip down memory lane for Lewis' widow, mother and aunt. Finishing touches are still being put in place - cables and scaffolding are everywhere, and during the tour, artist Oletha DeVane is setting up a video installation and soft sculpture on lynching.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2005
Gilman senior Travis Hale represents the unselfish attitude that has put the Greyhounds in position to successfully defend their Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association B Conference title on Sunday at Villa Julie College. Hale scored seven points and had a game-high 11 rebounds as host Gilman overcame a game-high 25 points by Severn's Deon Peters to defeat the Admirals, 62-59, in the conference semifinals last night. The Greyhounds (23-7) will play Boys' Latin, a 65-53 winner over Pallotti, for the championship at 5:15 p.m Sunday.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2004
Gilman had been scratching to get over the .500 mark after a slow start. The Greyhounds finally reached their destination, and made history in the process. On its home court last night, Gilman defeated Severn, 61-46, for the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association B Conference tournament title, its first league championship in 24 seasons. Sophomore center Reggie Fugett scored a game-high 24 points for Gilman (15-14), which finished with 13 wins in its last 17 games. Ben Goetsch added 11 for the Greyhounds.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2003
Carolyn Fugett welcomes you into her home as a new friend, almost family. She's warm and friendly and buoyantly energetic at an age she describes as "over 75." She immediately gives you the impression of strength. And she's the matriarch of a family that just seems to keep on growing. "I am the mother of six children, one deceased," she says. "I have 13 grandchildren, and two greats." Her deceased child, her first son, was Reginald F. Lewis, an extraordinary entrepreneur who rose from humble beginnings on North Dallas Street in East Baltimore to become the head of the billion-dollar TLC Beatrice International and one of America's richest men. He died with a brain tumor at the height of his success in 1993 when he was 50. Lewis will be celebrated tonight at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall with a gala that hopes to raise $1 million for the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2003
A group of African-American investors that includes basketball great Julius "Dr. J" Erving, Pittsburgh Steelers Hall of Famer Franco Harris and former Colts and Redskins running back Joe Washington hopes to become a player in the racetrack casino business in Maryland. The group, led locally by Baltimore businessman Anthony Fugett, has met in Annapolis with key black legislative leaders, according to sources familiar with the effort. The investors also have had talks with Joseph A. De Francis and other owners of the Pimlico and Laurel Park racetracks.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | October 14, 2001
JAMES, THE annoying buzzard, had offended me. I don't know what he did exactly, but it warranted a punch right in the chest. James responded with a much harder, and no doubt more painful, shot to my chest. Or maybe it was the other way around: It was I who had offended James, and he had punched me in the chest. When you're 10 years old and male, you're always getting offended and chest-punching the offender. Pretty soon we were standing, squared off from each other and about to go at it right in Mr. Fugett's fifth-grade classroom at Public School 141 in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | June 4, 1993
Jean S. Fugett Jr., the former pro football player and Baltimore lawyer, is pursuing a bid for the Orioles.Mr. Fugett, chairman of the billion-dollar TLC Beatrice International Holdings Inc., a company he took over from Reginald F. Lewis, his late half-brother, "is in the game" to buy the team and is pursuing a deal, a Beatrice spokesman said. He is one of five investors or groups expressing interest in buying the team from Orioles owner Eli S. Jacobs, who is in personal bankruptcy.Mr. Fugett declined to be interviewed for this article.
NEWS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
The bond between Barney Ehrmann and Reggie Fugett began as 5-year-old Gilman first-graders - not long after they heard their names read aloud within seconds of each other during the roll call. "We were always in the same, all-day homeroom, and in a lot of the same classes over the next few years until we were in like fourth grade," said Fugett, 17, adding that he and Ehrmann often paired off during social events and down time around the kindergarten-through-12th grade, all-boys private school campus.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
Anthony S. Fugett has a huge rebuilding task ahead of him -- and he knows he needs help.As the new head of Baltimore County's National Association for the Advancement of Colored People branch, the 46-year-old businessman has taken the helm of a chapter adrift in recent years amid infighting and charges of shoddy recordkeeping.But Fugett -- a member of the NAACP's national board who plans to bring his private sector expertise to his new post -- chooses not to dwell on the past.In a county where African-Americans are about 16 percent of the population, Fugett is determined to make the NAACP chapter an influential force.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 31, 1996
Remember Jean Fugett? Played football for Cardinal Gibbons High School, went to Amherst College for his brains, then played pro ball with the Dallas Cowboys?You don't hear so much about him any more, because his glamorous playing days are over and he's just a quiet attorney and businessman who's made millions of dollars around the various nations of the world while jetting off to Paris every month for fun and profit.Among other things in his life, Fugett holds onto his memories. The other night, he went to the 33rd annual Scholar Athlete Awards Dinner, which routinely performs the miracle of reminding us why we still treasure sports in this era of monstrous pro salaries, vanishing loyalty to communities and egos the size of the Hindenberg.
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