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By Richard Huff and Richard Huff,New York Daily News | February 11, 1994
Daisy Fuentes promises her new talk show for CNBC won't wade into the tabloid waters so favored by traditional talk fare."You will not see transsexuals who have gotten a sex change to become women and are now lesbians," Ms. Fuentes said the other day.Not only doesn't she want to make her viewers uncomfortable, she doesn't intend to make her guests feel that way, either. She just wants to find out "what makes them tick." And controversy isn't likely to be part of the mix."I don't enjoy controversy," she said.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | August 24, 2009
They came for conditioning, competition, camaraderie. They shared bloodlines, lots of sweat and more than a few tears, joyful for most who made it to the finish Sunday at Howard County's Centennial Park, painful for those who didn't. More than 2,400 women started the fourth Iron Girl Columbia Triathlon, the largest gathering of its kind, which is an event that starts with a 0.62-mile swim, continues with a 17.5-mile bike ride and concludes with a hilly, 3.4-mile run. Thousands of relatives and friends came to offer moral support.
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FEATURES
By Allen Josephs and Allen Josephs,Newsday | April 13, 1994
Mexican novelist Carlos Fuentes' magical new book, "The Orange Tree," snakes together five novellas into an intricately coiled mass in which heads and tails, beginnings and endings, fiction and history become deliberately indistinguishable. These are tales told by the dead, full of sound and fury, signifying all of Mr. Fuentes' obsessions: among other things the transmigration souls, the music of the spheres, the nature of God, man's inhumanity, duality and, as the original Spanish version made clear in its subtitle (omitted in English)
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2003
TIJUANA, Mexico - Tucked into a quiet street in the hilly working-class Libertad neighborhood overlooking the crossing to the United States sits a cafe that embodies the changes in this border city. An Internet cafe occupies part of the building. The other half is a dimly lit slice of Vienna or Milan, furnished with a grand piano, a lyre and a Viking helmet. Tijuana, the quintessential border town of liquor stores, auto shops and taco stands, has developed a flourishing opera scene, the product of years of toil by many people for love of the art. This cafe is a visible part.
NEWS
June 26, 1996
Bicyclist hit by car, found lying in roadwayA bicyclist was struck by a car early yesterday after he rode into its path in Columbia's Wilde Lake village, Howard County rescue officials said.Jose Fuentes, 25, of Columbia was treated at Howard County General Hospital yesterday and released, a hospital spokesman said.Fuentes rode his bicycle into the intersection of Governor Warfield Parkway and Twin Rivers Road about 12: 30 a.m. Rescuers found him several minutes later.Pub Date: 6/26/96
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
MARYDEL -- Eufemia Fuentes scooped up a handful of cornmeal mix, deftly rolled it into a ball, gently pressed it with three knuckles of her right hand, slipped it between wax paper in a steel press and flattened it. Another tortilla was ready for the griddle.The Walker trailer park off Route 311, where Fuentes and scores of other Guatemalan immigrants live in this Caroline County town near the Delaware border, has acquired a distinctive flavor. Tejano music blares from car stereos, children peer from the windows of rundown trailers, and immigrants trudge home from jobs in poultry-processing plants.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2003
GLORIA FUENTES of Ellicott City has lived in Maryland for 20 years, but she grew up and went to medical school in El Salvador. So when Church of the Resurrection in Ellicott City began organizing trips to El Salvador to provide medical care there, Fuentes, a pediatrician in Glen Burnie, was happy to help. "I know the needs," she said. "I thought this was my time to help a little bit." This year, Fuentes was one of 13 doctors, nurses and others who gave up their vacation and paid some expenses out of pocket to help members of a sister parish in the town of San Bartolo, on the outskirts of San Salvador.
NEWS
June 22, 2003
THEIR TROUBLES didn't end with their release from jail. Eight Arab men from Evansville, Ind., who were rounded up in the hysteria following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, had been cleared of any wrongdoing. The tip that led to their detention as "material witnesses" was bogus. Dead wrong. But suspicion continued to dog them. Four ended up on a federal crime registry that raised alarms when they tried to fly, rent an apartment and apply for permanent residency in the United States. Thomas V. Fuentes helped put an end to their ordeal.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | August 6, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- The Cubans in the section by the first-base line kept banging the drums. They danced, smoked cigars and drenched each other with beer. Several Cuban players showered each other with champagne on the pitcher's mound while others carried the Cuban flag around the stadium.It was party time Cuban style at L'Hospitalet Stadium last night.Cuba had won 71 of its previous 72 games, but none of the victories was like the 11-1 win over Taiwan last night.It gave the Cubans the first gold medal ever awarded for baseball and was a source of a lot of pride.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 10, 1998
It makes perfect sense that John Sayles would write and direct a film in Spanish. In the course of his prodigious career, he has become one of the cinema's most observant and empathetic regionalists, capturing the vernacular, atmosphere and collective consciousness of communities as diverse as a West Virginia coal mining town and a Louisiana bayou, from the jungle of a New Jersey city to the Texas-Mexico border."
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2003
GLORIA FUENTES of Ellicott City has lived in Maryland for 20 years, but she grew up and went to medical school in El Salvador. So when Church of the Resurrection in Ellicott City began organizing trips to El Salvador to provide medical care there, Fuentes, a pediatrician in Glen Burnie, was happy to help. "I know the needs," she said. "I thought this was my time to help a little bit." This year, Fuentes was one of 13 doctors, nurses and others who gave up their vacation and paid some expenses out of pocket to help members of a sister parish in the town of San Bartolo, on the outskirts of San Salvador.
NEWS
June 22, 2003
THEIR TROUBLES didn't end with their release from jail. Eight Arab men from Evansville, Ind., who were rounded up in the hysteria following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, had been cleared of any wrongdoing. The tip that led to their detention as "material witnesses" was bogus. Dead wrong. But suspicion continued to dog them. Four ended up on a federal crime registry that raised alarms when they tried to fly, rent an apartment and apply for permanent residency in the United States. Thomas V. Fuentes helped put an end to their ordeal.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | February 18, 2001
''There was a time when the beauty products we have now were nowhere to be had," Susan Taylor, editor of Essence magazine, writes in the introduction to the new book "The Essence Total Makeover: Body, Beauty, Spirit" (Three Rivers Press, $18) by Patricia Mignon Hinds. "The only lab creating cosmetics for women of color was the one we set up in our own kitchens. ... Today we have choices." From its inception 30 years ago, Essence has been all about expanding the choices African-American women have in both their well-being and way of life.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 2001
If this were a storybook, the first character we'd meet would be Angela Shelf Medearis. Can you find her in the crowd at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington? Don't bother searching up on stage where incoming first lady Laura Bush is introducing a handful of men and women to the TV cameras and microphones. Medearis is down in the audience - the 40-something grandmother who lives in sweat pants, bakes mouth-watering peach cobbler, and has a voice that sounds like it's stretched over a chuckle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and By Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | October 8, 2000
"The Years with Laura Diaz," by Carlos Fuentes. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 518 pages. $26. Mexico's leading novelist, Carlos Fuentes, the author of "The Old Gringo" and "The Death of Artemio Cruz," wastes the possibility of producing a great national epic through self-indulgent writing and a persistent unwillingness to edit his own material. Based largely on stories of his family and Fuentes' vast knowledge of 20th century Mexican history, "The Years with Laura Diaz" traces the life of its fictitious heroine through selected moments in her life which also connect with the ongoing history of the country.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- As the president of the world's most powerful nation visits the world's most populous nation, note that the future is being defined by disintegrative forces worldwide.In Europe in 1500 there were approximately 500 political entities. By the beginning of the 19th century there were a few dozen. The unifications of Italy and Germany further reduced the number. By 1920 Europe had 23 states with 18,000 kilometers of borders. But by 1994 it had 50 states and 40,000 kilometers of borders.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | August 24, 2009
They came for conditioning, competition, camaraderie. They shared bloodlines, lots of sweat and more than a few tears, joyful for most who made it to the finish Sunday at Howard County's Centennial Park, painful for those who didn't. More than 2,400 women started the fourth Iron Girl Columbia Triathlon, the largest gathering of its kind, which is an event that starts with a 0.62-mile swim, continues with a 17.5-mile bike ride and concludes with a hilly, 3.4-mile run. Thousands of relatives and friends came to offer moral support.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1994
MEXICO CITY -- Arturo Fuentes has his own method for choosing the best man to serve as Mexico's next president. He reads the candidates' faces.He doesn't like the doleful countenance of Cuauhtemoc Cardenas, the candidate of the leftist Democratic Revolutionary Party, the PRD."He has corruption in his face," opines Mr. Fuentes.Ernesto Zedillo, the candidate of the center-right governing Institutional Revolutionary Party, the PRI, Mr. Fuentes sees as "an honest, correct man."But Diego Fernandez de Cevallos, the challenger from the rightist National Action Party, PAN, has Mr. Fuentes stumped:"I can't tell about him. He's got a beard."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 10, 1998
It makes perfect sense that John Sayles would write and direct a film in Spanish. In the course of his prodigious career, he has become one of the cinema's most observant and empathetic regionalists, capturing the vernacular, atmosphere and collective consciousness of communities as diverse as a West Virginia coal mining town and a Louisiana bayou, from the jungle of a New Jersey city to the Texas-Mexico border."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
MARYDEL -- Eufemia Fuentes scooped up a handful of cornmeal mix, deftly rolled it into a ball, gently pressed it with three knuckles of her right hand, slipped it between wax paper in a steel press and flattened it. Another tortilla was ready for the griddle.The Walker trailer park off Route 311, where Fuentes and scores of other Guatemalan immigrants live in this Caroline County town near the Delaware border, has acquired a distinctive flavor. Tejano music blares from car stereos, children peer from the windows of rundown trailers, and immigrants trudge home from jobs in poultry-processing plants.
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