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Fuel Tank

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NEWS
July 15, 1996
A tiny plane resembling a motorized glider that crashed in Carroll County on Saturday night, killing the pilot, had been fitted with a second fuel tank that likely contributed to the crash, state police said yesterday.Investigators yesterday discovered the second fuel tank -- added after the purchase of the plane -- and speculated that the weight of the tank and up to 5 gallons of fuel it holds might have led to the crash in a remote, wooded area that killed pilot John F. Harrison, 33, of Union Bridge about 7: 45 p.m. Saturday near Roop Road and Kimberly Drive just north of Mount Airy.
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EXPLORE
March 14, 2012
Talk about rebuilding or replacing Havre de Grace High School got me to thinking. Talk about rebuilding or replacing Havre de Grace High School got me thinking. For more than a year, some noticeable changes have been taking place at the school. It started with the removal of what for generations had been the school's tennis courts tucked behind the gym at the corner of Adams and Bourbon streets. It's been a long time since they've been used for tennis. In recent years as they fell further and further into disrepair, they had been used primarily for baseball, lacrosse and softball teams seeking a dry spot during the cold, wet months of spring.
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NEWS
May 31, 2007
Two people suffered minor injuries when a fuel tank exploded at a construction site in Hunt Valley yesterday morning, Baltimore County fire officials said. About 8:45 a.m., workers hit an underground tank near Cockeysville Road and Beaver Court in an industrial area. The tank, which contained a small amount of fuel, exploded, rupturing a concrete cap above it, said Fire Department spokeswoman Elise Armacost. One worker was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center with injuries that were not considered life-threatening.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
Crews from the Baltimore City Fire Department and the Maryland Department of the Environment worked most of Wednesday morning responding to a 2,000-gallon fuel spill from a train in South Baltimore. Fire officials said the train's fuel tank ruptured about 9:30 a.m. on the tracks along Fort Armistead Road. The spill is confined to the track area and no injuries have occurred, though it has disrupted rail traffic in the area. Officials have yet to determine what caused the rupture.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 1, 2006
NASA said yesterday that changes to the space shuttle's external fuel tank should prevent large chunks of insulating foam from falling off and hitting the craft, keeping the next mission on schedule for a possible July 1 launch. "Based on what we know today, there is no reason not to launch on July 1," said program manager N. Wayne Hale Jr., who stressed that the final decision won't be made until engineers certify that the fuel tank is safe and the shuttle passes a flight readiness test.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz | January 10, 2008
The Maryland State Fire Marshal's office in Bel Air is investigating an incident in which fireworks were placed in the fuel tank of a vehicle in Abingdon, authorities said. The owner discovered the fireworks shortly before 8 a.m. yesterday and called authorities. A spokeswoman for the fire marshal's Harford County office said the fireworks did not explode and caused no damage to the 2003 Ford Taurus in the 2900 block of Trellis Lane. No one was injured. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call the fire marshal at 410-836- 4844.
NEWS
May 30, 2002
Carroll County's Board of Zoning Appeals granted Lehigh Portland Cement Co. permission yesterday to build a 3,000-gallon, above-ground fuel tank closer to a residential area than would normally be allowed. The county's zoning laws say such a tank should not be closer than 1,000 feet to a residential area. Lehigh, located in Union Bridge, plans to install its tank about 825 feet from the nearest property. After hearing testimony from several Lehigh representatives, board members said they were sufficiently convinced that the tank's double-walling and sophisticated alarm system would prevent accidents that might endanger residents.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - An aviation safety breakthrough by government scientists has led to affordable technology that could virtually eliminate catastrophic fuel tank explosions like the one that destroyed TWA Flight 800, Federal Aviation Administration officials said yesterday. FAA Administrator Marion C. Blakey said the agency planned to require the airline industry to install new equipment on about 3,800 Boeing and Airbus passenger jets, which constitute the bulk of the commercial fleet. The process of issuing a regulation and phasing in the fixes could take nearly 10 years to complete at a cost of $140,000 to $220,000 per plane.
NEWS
January 16, 1999
A man cleaning the inside of a fuel tank at a Baltimore County trailer company was critically injured yesterday when he was overcome by fumes. The state is investigating possible safety violations.Marion Scollar, 28, who worked for Brody Transportation Trailer Division just outside the city in Baltimore Highlands, was in critical condition yesterday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.Baltimore County Battalion Chief Mark Hubbard said firefighters who were called to the company in the 3500 block of Marmenco Court about 11 a.m. found Scollar lying unconscious inside a large tank used to transport fuel on the back of a truck.
NEWS
By Jamie Manfuso and Jamie Manfuso,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2001
Despite lobbying against construction of a diesel fuel tank at Sweetheart Cup's distribution center last fall, Hampstead officials said last night they have no plans to publicly oppose a new proposal for a tank there. "While it's not perfect, it's better than what it was before," Hampstead Mayor Christopher M. Nevin said at last night's Town Council meeting. The last proposal placed the above-ground fuel tank within 225 feet of homes on Houcksville Road - well within the 600-foot distance required by county zoning regulations.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2011
On the evening of Feb. 2, 1942, an unarmed tanker with 66,000 barrels of crude oil on board was steaming in the Atlantic, about 90 miles off Ocean City . Without warning, it was struck by German torpedoes. The attack set the W.L. Steed ablaze, and sank it; only a handful of the crew of 38 survived. As World War II unfolded, the Germans had moved part of their sub pack west to attack shipping along the coast. By the time the Nazis withdrew the subs in July to focus on convoys crossing the North Atlantic, they had sunk 397 ships in U.S. coastal waters.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | July 25, 2008
Baltimore County has agreed to pay a fine to settle allegations that officials didn't report a potential leak from an underground diesel fuel tank and didn't properly check and upgrade underground fuel storage tanks at 13 county facilities, authorities said yesterday. The settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires the county to pay a $28,968 penalty and install a $90,000 computerized system to monitor the fuel tanks, according to the federal agency. The most serious violation was the failure to report a discrepancy in inventory records for an underground diesel fuel tank at a maintenance shop in Woodlawn in late 2006 and early 2007, according to the EPA. A discrepancy in inventory records can indicate leaks, said Donna Heron, an EPA spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | February 22, 2008
As the Pentagon continued to scan debris from an errant spy satellite struck by a Navy missile, officials said yesterday that results so far look good. Preliminary reports showed that the SM-3 missile launched by the USS Lake Erie likely destroyed the satellite's hydrazine fuel tank 153 miles above Earth, leaving no pieces larger than a football. "If that's true, there should be no danger to anyone," said Ray Sedwick, an assistant professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz | January 10, 2008
The Maryland State Fire Marshal's office in Bel Air is investigating an incident in which fireworks were placed in the fuel tank of a vehicle in Abingdon, authorities said. The owner discovered the fireworks shortly before 8 a.m. yesterday and called authorities. A spokeswoman for the fire marshal's Harford County office said the fireworks did not explode and caused no damage to the 2003 Ford Taurus in the 2900 block of Trellis Lane. No one was injured. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call the fire marshal at 410-836- 4844.
NEWS
By John Johnson Jr. and John Johnson Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 24, 2007
The shuttle Discovery rocketed into space yesterday, carrying a crew of seven on a challenging two-week mission to continue construction of the International Space Station. The flight includes five spacewalks, the largest number of any shuttle mission. Discovery blasted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida at 11:38 a.m. on an eight-minute jump to space that carried the shuttle from a standing start to a speed of more than 17,000 mph. Discovery's engines guzzled fuel equivalent to emptying a backyard swimming pool every 23 seconds.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Erika Hayasaki and Greg Miller and Erika Hayasaki,Los Angeles Times | June 3, 2007
NEW YORK -- Federal investigators said yesterday they had disrupted a plot by Islamic extremists to blow up buildings, fuel tanks and pipelines at John F. Kennedy International Airport, another plan to take aim at America's air travel system and a landmark in its largest city. The arrests of a U.S. citizen from Guyana and alleged accomplices in Trinidad underscored what counterterrorism officials have described as the global spread of the terrorist threat beyond the Muslim countries in the Middle East and Asia associated with al-Qaida and other groups.
NEWS
By MICHAEL CABBAGE AND ROBYN SHELTON and MICHAEL CABBAGE AND ROBYN SHELTON,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 5, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Shuttle Discovery's astronauts will inspect much of their ship's heat shielding for signs of damage today after a Fourth of July liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center, the first shuttle flight in almost a year. Mission managers expressed confidence that the inspections will confirm indications from launch photography that the shuttle's fuel tank did not shed dangerous pieces of foam insulation as happened on three of the past four flights. Footage from a video camera mounted on the tank showed several small objects breaking off at five different times during Discovery's 8 1/2 -minute climb to orbit, en route to the International Space Station.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | February 22, 2008
As the Pentagon continued to scan debris from an errant spy satellite struck by a Navy missile, officials said yesterday that results so far look good. Preliminary reports showed that the SM-3 missile launched by the USS Lake Erie likely destroyed the satellite's hydrazine fuel tank 153 miles above Earth, leaving no pieces larger than a football. "If that's true, there should be no danger to anyone," said Ray Sedwick, an assistant professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland.
NEWS
May 31, 2007
Two people suffered minor injuries when a fuel tank exploded at a construction site in Hunt Valley yesterday morning, Baltimore County fire officials said. About 8:45 a.m., workers hit an underground tank near Cockeysville Road and Beaver Court in an industrial area. The tank, which contained a small amount of fuel, exploded, rupturing a concrete cap above it, said Fire Department spokeswoman Elise Armacost. One worker was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center with injuries that were not considered life-threatening.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | December 7, 2006
State transportation officials said yesterday they expect to spend $24 million over the next five years to replace underground fuel storage tanks that fail to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. The tanks are at a dozen Maryland Transit Administration facilities and store the diesel fuel and gasoline used by buses, MARC trains and other state vehicles, officials said. James F. Ports Jr., deputy secretary of the Department of Transportation, told the Board of Public Works yesterday that the tank replacements are part of a negotiated settlement with EPA that also requires the state to pay a penalty of $172,207.
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