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Fuel Efficiency

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NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,Los Angeles Times | June 22, 2007
Washington -- The Senate passed an energy bill last night that includes an increase in automobile fuel economy, new laws against energy price-gouging and a requirement for huge increases in the production of ethanol. In an eleventh-hour compromise fashioned after two days of closed-door meetings, an agreement was reached to increase average fuel economy by 40 percent to 35 miles per gallon for cars, SUVs and pickup trucks by 2020. But the fuel economy issue threatened to topple the legislation up to the last minute.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
UPPER MARLBORO — President Barack Obama announced Tuesday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will tighten fuel efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty trucks as part of an effort to address greenhouse gas pollution administratively rather than waiting on Congress. Speaking at a sprawling Safeway distribution center here, Obama said the more aggressive fuel standards — which he said would be in place for 2018 models — would both cut carbon emissions and reduce the nation's reliance on foreign oil. "Every mile that we gain in fuel efficiency is worth thousands of dollars of savings every year," Obama said.
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NEWS
August 29, 2012
With gas prices hovering around $4 a gallon this summer, everyone who drives can appreciate the beauty of vehicles designed to go twice as far on a tank of fuel than today's models - including the people who build cars. Some ideas simply make too much sense to stir much controversy. That's why even the U.S. auto industry has embraced the new fuel efficiency standards issued by the Environmental Protection Agency this week. The rules will require all new cars and trucks to average 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025, nearly double the fuel efficiency of the U.S. fleet in 2008.
NEWS
June 25, 2013
With this week's heat wave, air quality warnings and severe weather forecasts as a backdrop, President Barack Obama could scarcely have picked a more auspicious moment to reveal his multi-pronged plan to address climate change. His surprise decision to oppose the Keystone XL pipeline from Canada if the project is judged to cause a net increase in greenhouse gases underscores the seriousness of the issue - while the swift criticism of that choice (and Mr. Obama's plan, generally) demonstrates the Congressional denial and partisanship that is endangering the nation's health and safety.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | May 16, 2011
When the stock market went gangbusters during the late 1990s,  people boasted about how much their 401(k)s went up. During the housing boom, bragging rights belonged to those whose home values rose the most. Now that gas prices are soaring, those who get the most miles per gallon are likely to wow the crowd. But Edmunds.com, the online provider of car information, says that gauges in cars overstate fuel efficiency. Edmunds conducted 14 tests on seven vehicles and found that on average the MPG gauges were off by 5.5 percent.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
UPPER MARLBORO — President Barack Obama announced Tuesday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will tighten fuel efficiency standards for medium- and heavy-duty trucks as part of an effort to address greenhouse gas pollution administratively rather than waiting on Congress. Speaking at a sprawling Safeway distribution center here, Obama said the more aggressive fuel standards — which he said would be in place for 2018 models — would both cut carbon emissions and reduce the nation's reliance on foreign oil. "Every mile that we gain in fuel efficiency is worth thousands of dollars of savings every year," Obama said.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | February 23, 2012
Has Gov.Martin O'Malley's broad array of tax increase proposals got you bummed out? Cheer up, there's a bright spot. If Mr. O'Malley succeeds in his plan to impose Maryland's 6 percent sales tax on the purchase of gasoline, he will not only boost revenues for long-overdue highway, bridge and mass transit projects but possibly help clean the Chesapeake Bay at the same time - a formula that could work not just in Maryland but in all of the bay...
NEWS
June 25, 2013
With this week's heat wave, air quality warnings and severe weather forecasts as a backdrop, President Barack Obama could scarcely have picked a more auspicious moment to reveal his multi-pronged plan to address climate change. His surprise decision to oppose the Keystone XL pipeline from Canada if the project is judged to cause a net increase in greenhouse gases underscores the seriousness of the issue - while the swift criticism of that choice (and Mr. Obama's plan, generally) demonstrates the Congressional denial and partisanship that is endangering the nation's health and safety.
NEWS
By Dave Juday | August 26, 2012
This year's drought, along with recent news reports of the lowest corn yield in 17 years, has rekindled the food vs. fuel debate - and, for good reasons. When Congress passed the Energy Independence and Security Act in 2007, an ambitious schedule for incorporating ethanol into the nation's fuel supply known as the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) was established. Though ethanol was sold as a way to make our energy supply more secure, little consideration was given to what every farmer knows: Mother Nature can be fickle, as this year's drought proves.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
Sparrows Point said this morning it has loaded some of its locomotives with equipment that will reduce idling time and emissions as part of a clean diesel program initiated by the port of Baltimore. The Baltimore County steel mill said seven switch locomotives would be outfitted with the equipment that will automatically shut down the engine when it has been idling for a certain amount of time. The engine will automatically restart to keep the engine coolant warm in cold weather and when power is needed from the locomotive.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
Your editorial on the Environmental Protection Agency's new fuel efficiency standards was right on point ("EPA gets it right," Aug. 29). It lets us know where a Romney administration's priorities really would be on fuel standards. Hopefully, anyone who hasn't made up their minds about who to vote for in November will now know how to cast their ballot. James Maddox Jr., Baltimore
NEWS
August 29, 2012
With gas prices hovering around $4 a gallon this summer, everyone who drives can appreciate the beauty of vehicles designed to go twice as far on a tank of fuel than today's models - including the people who build cars. Some ideas simply make too much sense to stir much controversy. That's why even the U.S. auto industry has embraced the new fuel efficiency standards issued by the Environmental Protection Agency this week. The rules will require all new cars and trucks to average 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025, nearly double the fuel efficiency of the U.S. fleet in 2008.
NEWS
By Dave Juday | August 26, 2012
This year's drought, along with recent news reports of the lowest corn yield in 17 years, has rekindled the food vs. fuel debate - and, for good reasons. When Congress passed the Energy Independence and Security Act in 2007, an ambitious schedule for incorporating ethanol into the nation's fuel supply known as the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) was established. Though ethanol was sold as a way to make our energy supply more secure, little consideration was given to what every farmer knows: Mother Nature can be fickle, as this year's drought proves.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | February 23, 2012
Has Gov.Martin O'Malley's broad array of tax increase proposals got you bummed out? Cheer up, there's a bright spot. If Mr. O'Malley succeeds in his plan to impose Maryland's 6 percent sales tax on the purchase of gasoline, he will not only boost revenues for long-overdue highway, bridge and mass transit projects but possibly help clean the Chesapeake Bay at the same time - a formula that could work not just in Maryland but in all of the bay...
NEWS
August 1, 2011
Lost in all the recent furor over the federal debt-ceiling and gridlocked Washington was a major breakthrough for the Obama administration and good news for the economy, national security and environment. Thanks to an accord reached with automakers, regulators, unions and the state of California, President Barack Obama proposed vehicle fuel efficiency standards last Friday that could dramatically reduce the nation's dependence on foreign oil. The new rules call for a 54.5-miles-per-gallon fleet-wide standard for cars and light trucks by 2025 - based on a 5 percent improvement each year beginning in 2017.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | May 16, 2011
When the stock market went gangbusters during the late 1990s,  people boasted about how much their 401(k)s went up. During the housing boom, bragging rights belonged to those whose home values rose the most. Now that gas prices are soaring, those who get the most miles per gallon are likely to wow the crowd. But Edmunds.com, the online provider of car information, says that gauges in cars overstate fuel efficiency. Edmunds conducted 14 tests on seven vehicles and found that on average the MPG gauges were off by 5.5 percent.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 20, 1991
DETROIT -- About 18 years ago, Honda Motor Co. got a lot of attention when it displayed its Civic, which had an unusual, fuel-efficient engine that satisfied pollution concerns.In two weeks, Honda will introduce a new Civic model whose engine could have a big impact in the current debate: Whether fuel-efficient cars need come only in small packages.The 1992 Civic VX, which can comfortably seat up to five people, is equipped with a four-cylinder engine that Honda expects to get a government fuel-efficiency rating of 55 miles a gallon on the highway and 48 miles a gallon in the city.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A Nevada senator wants to see the average new car get 40 miles per gallon by the turn of the century. Detroit automakers and their allies on Capitol Hill want him to take a hike.The controversial issue of boosting the fuel efficiency of cars was dropped from the energy bill now before the Senate. Democratic leaders feared the provision would derail the entire measure.But Sen. Richard H. Bryan, D-Nev., the Senate's chief advocate of fuel efficiency, said he may push ahead with a separate bill this year that would require all automakers to make cars that get better gas mileage by 2001.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
Sparrows Point said this morning it has loaded some of its locomotives with equipment that will reduce idling time and emissions as part of a clean diesel program initiated by the port of Baltimore. The Baltimore County steel mill said seven switch locomotives would be outfitted with the equipment that will automatically shut down the engine when it has been idling for a certain amount of time. The engine will automatically restart to keep the engine coolant warm in cold weather and when power is needed from the locomotive.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
It took just more than a week for American consumers to scoop up the $1 billion the federal government devoted to its "cash for clunkers" program as the incentive created a frenzy at the nation's car dealerships the like they haven't seen for years. The House of Representatives voted quickly last week to extend the program by transferring another $2 billion from another part of the federal stimulus program, and the Senate should follow suit. This program is exactly the kind of thing the stimulus should be made of because it accomplishes multiple goals with one investment.
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