Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFuel Cells
IN THE NEWS

Fuel Cells

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
The most abundant element in the universe - hydrogen - may one day fuel your car. But some scientists are not so sure that's a good idea. Hydrogen has been used for the past decade to power fuel cells, which are something like batteries and use a chemical reaction to produce electricity. The fuel cells are promoted as a way to reduce pollution and dependence on foreign oil. They won the endorsement of President Bush in January when he pledged $1.2 billion for hydrogen research, and U.S. automakers are testing fleets of experimental vehicles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 15, 2013
Imagine having a safe, reliable and affordable backup generator the next time a big storm knocks your power out. A University of Maryland researcher says he and his colleagues are close to making that dream a reality, with breakthrough fuel-cell technology that could put a dishwasher-sized, quiet power plant on the roof or in the basement of any business or home to keep the lights on, come what may. "It's a complete system - natural gas...
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Ken Bensinger and Ken Bensinger,Los Angeles Times | December 15, 2007
Advocates of alternative-fuel vehicles would seem a unified bunch of tree-huggers, bound by their determination to wean the world's automobiles off fossil fuels. But there's a red-hot fight brewing in the green-car world. Proponents of the two most-hyped technologies - hydrogen fuel cells and plug-in electric hybrids - are squared off in an increasingly bitter fight. They are vying for publicity, manufacturer acceptance, favorable regulation and, especially, financing for research and investment in infrastructure and marketing.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
Maryland's Fire Marshall has banned sky lanterns, the increasingly popular paper balloons that are sent aloft by the heat of a candle or fuel cell suspended from the bottom. "They're made with oiled rice paper and bamboo - it's almost kindling," said Deputy State Fire Marshal Bruce D. Bouch. "They have to land somewhere, and sometimes they're still partly on fire when they hit the ground. They've been known to ignite dry vegetation. " Bouch said the fire marshal's office frequently gets calls from people interested in using sky lanterns in weddings or other celebrations who want to know if they are legal in Maryland.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1997
Rising levels of carbon dioxide in the air threaten global warming, but such worries are good news for the future of another substance -- hydrogen.Pure hydrogen is a nearly ideal fuel -- potentially a clean, abundant replacement for the carbon-based fossil fuels whose combustion has loosed all the carbon dioxide in the first place.Hydrogen is the most plentiful element in the universe. When burned, it produces water vapor and heat. (And despite memories of the Hindenburg, advocates insist that it is no more dangerous to handle than gasoline.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
Engineers know they can build cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells. The question is, where do you get a hydrogen fill-up? That's one of the issues President Bush plans to address in a $1.2 billion plan to encourage the development of automobiles that run on hydrogen fuel. Studied and tinkered with since the 1970s, fuel cell technology is used as a power source by NASA today and even powers a few cars on the road. Proponents say widespread adoption could drastically reduce pollution and our dependence on foreign oil. But scientists, engineers and automakers say it has a long way to go. They hope the president's decision to highlight the program in his State of the Union message will help advance the technology.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
Commentator Bob Bruninga would have us believe that electric cars could substantially increase the energy efficiency and decrease the environmental impact of autos while providing an economical and practical alternative to our current gasoline-fueled fleet ("Keep on open mind on electric cars," Oct. 4). Nothing could be farther from the truth. Let's look at energy efficiency. The gasoline-fueled internal combustion engine has an efficiency rate of about 25 percent, while diesels have an efficiency rate of 30 percent.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 7, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A problem with the system that provides power to the shuttle caused NASA yesterday to once again delay the launch of the space shuttle Atlantis. Space agency managers were scheduled to meet today in hopes of clearing the way for a launch tomorrow. The launch was only hours away yesterday morning when engineers reported a short in one of three fuel cells that supply electricity for all the onboard systems, including the crew compartment. Although the systems are redundant, the launch was scrubbed out of fear that a problem in one generating system could appear in others.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
The automobile is poised for its most profound change since Karl Benz built the first horseless carriage in 1885. General Motors Corp. offered a peek into the industry's future last week at the Detroit Auto Show when it took the wraps off its prototype hydrogen-fed fuel cell vehicle featuring "drive-by-wire" technology. Analysts said it amounts to the reinvention of the automobile. "Awesome," said David E. Cole, director of the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich. "This is a giant leap forward in automotive conceptual thinking."
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 15, 2013
Imagine having a safe, reliable and affordable backup generator the next time a big storm knocks your power out. A University of Maryland researcher says he and his colleagues are close to making that dream a reality, with breakthrough fuel-cell technology that could put a dishwasher-sized, quiet power plant on the roof or in the basement of any business or home to keep the lights on, come what may. "It's a complete system - natural gas...
NEWS
October 9, 2012
Commentator Bob Bruninga would have us believe that electric cars could substantially increase the energy efficiency and decrease the environmental impact of autos while providing an economical and practical alternative to our current gasoline-fueled fleet ("Keep on open mind on electric cars," Oct. 4). Nothing could be farther from the truth. Let's look at energy efficiency. The gasoline-fueled internal combustion engine has an efficiency rate of about 25 percent, while diesels have an efficiency rate of 30 percent.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 16, 2008
Journalists frothed over General Motors' fuel-cell car. Hydrogen fuel! NASA technology! The future seemed very close when GM showed off Electrovan - in 1966, only to permanently garage it because nobody could afford it. Is it any closer now? I gunned GM's fuel-cell version of the Chevrolet Equinox onto the Jones Falls Expressway. The retrofitted sport utility vehicle is as powerful as you could wish and, lacking pistons, a transmission or even a combustion chamber, quiet as a baby buggy.
BUSINESS
By Ken Bensinger and Ken Bensinger,Los Angeles Times | December 15, 2007
Advocates of alternative-fuel vehicles would seem a unified bunch of tree-huggers, bound by their determination to wean the world's automobiles off fossil fuels. But there's a red-hot fight brewing in the green-car world. Proponents of the two most-hyped technologies - hydrogen fuel cells and plug-in electric hybrids - are squared off in an increasingly bitter fight. They are vying for publicity, manufacturer acceptance, favorable regulation and, especially, financing for research and investment in infrastructure and marketing.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 7, 2006
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A problem with the system that provides power to the shuttle caused NASA yesterday to once again delay the launch of the space shuttle Atlantis. Space agency managers were scheduled to meet today in hopes of clearing the way for a launch tomorrow. The launch was only hours away yesterday morning when engineers reported a short in one of three fuel cells that supply electricity for all the onboard systems, including the crew compartment. Although the systems are redundant, the launch was scrubbed out of fear that a problem in one generating system could appear in others.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 21, 2004
DETROIT - Ford Motor Co.'s profit in the second quarter almost tripled to $1.17 billion, bolstered by record earnings from vehicle loans. The No. 2 U.S. automaker forecast profit for the current quarter to be below analyst estimates. Net income was 57 cents a share, up from $417 million, or 22 cents, a year earlier, Ford said. Revenue rose 5.5 percent to $42.8 billion. Chief executive William Clay Ford Jr., 47, is being helped by cost reductions and loans made by its Ford Motor Credit unit, which produced three-fourths of earnings in the quarter.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
The most abundant element in the universe - hydrogen - may one day fuel your car. But some scientists are not so sure that's a good idea. Hydrogen has been used for the past decade to power fuel cells, which are something like batteries and use a chemical reaction to produce electricity. The fuel cells are promoted as a way to reduce pollution and dependence on foreign oil. They won the endorsement of President Bush in January when he pledged $1.2 billion for hydrogen research, and U.S. automakers are testing fleets of experimental vehicles.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2000
As the electricity industry deregulates, utility companies will have to decide whether a new technology expected to hit the energy market as early as next year is a threat or an opportunity. Fuel cells -- which function much like a huge battery, generating power through a pollution-free chemical reaction -- are poised to present serious competition to utilities. Though fuel cells are still in the development stage, manufacturers and industry experts said they will save consumers money and help clean up the environment.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | January 16, 2008
Journalists frothed over General Motors' fuel-cell car. Hydrogen fuel! NASA technology! The future seemed very close when GM showed off Electrovan - in 1966, only to permanently garage it because nobody could afford it. Is it any closer now? I gunned GM's fuel-cell version of the Chevrolet Equinox onto the Jones Falls Expressway. The retrofitted sport utility vehicle is as powerful as you could wish and, lacking pistons, a transmission or even a combustion chamber, quiet as a baby buggy.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
Engineers know they can build cars that run on hydrogen fuel cells. The question is, where do you get a hydrogen fill-up? That's one of the issues President Bush plans to address in a $1.2 billion plan to encourage the development of automobiles that run on hydrogen fuel. Studied and tinkered with since the 1970s, fuel cell technology is used as a power source by NASA today and even powers a few cars on the road. Proponents say widespread adoption could drastically reduce pollution and our dependence on foreign oil. But scientists, engineers and automakers say it has a long way to go. They hope the president's decision to highlight the program in his State of the Union message will help advance the technology.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
The automobile is poised for its most profound change since Karl Benz built the first horseless carriage in 1885. General Motors Corp. offered a peek into the industry's future last week at the Detroit Auto Show when it took the wraps off its prototype hydrogen-fed fuel cell vehicle featuring "drive-by-wire" technology. Analysts said it amounts to the reinvention of the automobile. "Awesome," said David E. Cole, director of the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor, Mich. "This is a giant leap forward in automotive conceptual thinking."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.