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By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2010
Saundra Byrd from Brooklyn, Md., was looking for a recipe for peanut-butter fudge. She said the fudge was served in Baltimore County school cafeterias in the 1960s and '70s. Barbara Whitman of Glyndon sent in a recipe for peanut-butter fudge that she obtained when she was a teacher at Franklin Junior High School in the early 1970s. I'm fairly confident that fudge as luscious and rich as this, even with peanut butter as a main ingredient, would not be found in a school cafeteria these days.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
There's nothing different about your Berger cookie. It's just the nutritional label that's changed. A sharp-eyed shopper wrote in to tell us that he had tried the Berger cookie that has 0 grams of trans fat, and that it tasted just as good as the 1-gram fudge-topped classic that's been produced and enjoyed in Baltimore for generations. We went out and bought a pack of trans-fat-free Berger and we also couldn't see or taste anything different about the new Berger cookie.  That's because there is no difference.
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NEWS
July 13, 1993
Tollie Fudge, an operating engineer for 30 years for Bethlehem Steel Corp., died Thursday of lung cancer at the Dallas Medical Center in Dallas. He was 72.Mr. Fudge retired in 1986 from Austin Industries in Texas as a heavy equipment manager.Born and reared in Hamlin, Texas, Mr. Fudge moved to Baltimore in the mid-1940s. He married the former Frances Rybak in 1945. They lived in Lutherville for 35 years before moving to Dallas eight years ago.During World War II, he served in the Navy Seabees, the construction arm of the Navy, and later was an aviation cadet while attending Dartmouth and Yale universities.
TRAVEL
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Oh, fudge. Holy moly. Dagnabbit. Whether you've been bitten by a crab, or spent six hours snarled in Bay Bridge traffic, Ocean City hopes you'll mind your language. Town officials will soon be posting signs along the boardwalk asking visitors to refrain from cursing. "We just want to remind everyone that even when they're on vacation, they need to be courteous to others," said Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan. The signs, which read "No profanity please," will be posted on every block of the boardwalk before the summer season begins, city officials say. The Town Council approved the measure this week in an effort to preserve Ocean City 's reputation as a destination for families with children.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2006
Lynette Lesire of Silverton, Ore., was looking for a recipe for fudge made from chocolate pudding. She thought the recipe once appeared on the back of a Royal pudding box. Mary Owens from Berryville, Va., sent in a recipe for Chocolate-Pudding Fudge she clipped from an advertisement in a magazine for Jell-O pudding. While her recipe uses a different brand of pudding than Lesire was seeking, the easy three-step recipe makes a surprisingly good chocolate fudge. It can be made in under 15 minutes (plus refrigeration time)
FEATURES
By Steven Raichlen and Steven Raichlen,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 8, 1995
My grandmother is not the best cook in our family (that distinction goes to my Aunt Annette, as my grandmother freely admits). But Grammie Ethel does have two or three dishes that have won her an honored place in the family culinary pantheon. The first is a chicken noodle soup you fairly ache for when you have a cold. The second is a cookie so buttery and crisp, family members have almost come to fisticuffs over who gets the last one. But the most formidable weapon in her culinary arsenal is Grammie Ethel's Chocolate Fudge.
FEATURES
November 14, 1990
If you want to give your friends something sweet this year for Christmas don't look any farther than this delicious fudge recipe.The fudge may be stored in airtight containers at room temperature for up to two weeks. It may be frozen for up to six months.Easy, Fabulous FudgeThis recipe makes five pounds of fudge or more than 100 1-inch pieces. This is sufficient for about six to eight gifts.12 ounces Baker's German sweet chocolate broken into pieces12 ounces semi-sweet chocolate morsels1 (7-ounce)
FEATURES
September 11, 1991
If it weren't for a Vassar College student who botched a recipe for making caramels or toffee, we may never have come to know the joys of fudge.Karen Milbourn, spokeswoman for Fanny Farmer Candy Shops, reports that even though the details are sketchy, the enterprising student was undaunted when she "fudged" the recipe and eventually wound up selling the confection in a local grocery store for 40 cents a pound. That was in 1886.Apparently word about the "failure" spread -- at least among the Seven Sisters colleges -- because 12 years later a Wellesley College student wrote about fudge-making in her yearbook.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2001
Debbie Keelan of Eldersburg requested a recipe for a treat she had at a Preakness party. It "was something like a Heath Bar. I know that it was made with saltine crackers covered on one side with chocolate." Her response came from Nancy Lewis of Columbia, who sent in a recipe for Heath Fudge Bars. "I hope this helps," she wrote. Heath Fudge Bars Makes approximately 30 pieces 1 sleeve (about 40) saltine crackers 1 cup (2 sticks) butter 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 12 ounces chocolate chips 1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts or pecans Line a large cooking sheet (one with a lip)
TRAVEL
By Rosemary McClure and Rosemary McClure,Los Angeles Times | August 17, 2008
MACKINAC ISLAND, Mich. - Temptation drifts on the wind in this enchanted island in northern Michigan. Seventeen fudge shops crowd the downtown area, and delectable scents escape every time a door opens. Chocolate, peanut butter, more chocolate. Each store offers free samples. "Try them all," said a tour guide when I visited early in July. "It adds up to about a pound of the best fudge you've ever tasted." I would never do that, I thought to myself when he said it. But I tried one. And then another and another.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Paula Pumphrey from Glen Burnie was hoping someone would have the recipe for the fudge that was made and sold for a fundraiser for Public School 84 and the Salem Lutheran Church around the corner when she was growing up in South Baltimore. She said her mother, who is 90, also attended P.S. 84 and remembers the fudge fondly. She said the fudge was about a half-inch thick and snapped when you bit into it. It immediately melted in your mouth. Marilyn Vogel from Baltimore had the recipe Pumphrey was searching for. She said she was the secretary at P.S. 84, also known as the Thomas Johnson School, for 30 years and was a member of the school's "Mother's Club," which made the fudge.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
In its obituary of William Rees-Mogg, sometime editor of The Times , Britain's Independent included this passage : Fraser Nelson, the editor of The Spectator, yesterday recalled the advice Lord Rees-Mogg gave him in 2001: "He said he took inspiration from Ben Johnson's essays: the originals, he said, were still the best. " It seems unlikely, highly unlikely, that Lord Rees-Mogg looked for inspiration to Timber , the collection of miscellaneous notes and observations by Ben Jonson, published posthumously.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 11, 2012
The Obama administration is touting the latest unemployment numbers released last week by the U.S. Department of Labor as proof its policies are working. But a closer look at the actual number of able-bodied people who are willing to work, but are not, reveals a different picture. As economist John R. Lott has written, not only is the drop in the unemployment rate from 8.5 percent to 8.3 percent still half a percentage point higher than when President Barack Obama took office three years ago, the number of unemployed is higher.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
Dawn Jemellaro from Baltimore was looking for a recipe for a fudge that was made using pudding mix. She said her mother made it many times, but she had lost the recipe. Maureen Rochelle from Ellicott City sent in a recipe for fudge that she found in a Jell-O cookbook from the 1970s. The recipe makes what I might call faux fudge, as it does not have the same texture or depth of flavor of more traditional fudge. However, it is so quick and easy that even a child could make it successfully.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
At a time when employers receive hundreds of applications for a single job opening, a glowing reference could be the difference between standing out and sitting at home. Enter CareerExcuse.com, a website that promises to "act as your past employer" and provide you with a positive reference. "You provide us with your name, employment dates, ending salary and job titles, we do the rest!!" the site pledges. Of course it's never OK to lie, and doing so can backfire. But some workers are desperate in what is the worst job market in more than a generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2010
Saundra Byrd from Brooklyn, Md., was looking for a recipe for peanut-butter fudge. She said the fudge was served in Baltimore County school cafeterias in the 1960s and '70s. Barbara Whitman of Glyndon sent in a recipe for peanut-butter fudge that she obtained when she was a teacher at Franklin Junior High School in the early 1970s. I'm fairly confident that fudge as luscious and rich as this, even with peanut butter as a main ingredient, would not be found in a school cafeteria these days.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2001
Ah, fudge. Of all the holiday candies, fudge may be the most popular and best-loved. For novice candy makers, it can also be the most feared. There are plenty of shortcut recipes, but the real stuff takes a fair amount of boiling, along with a good candy thermometer or, better yet, enough experience to judge cooking stages by other means, such as dropping a spoonful into ice water and assessing the results. For all its rewards, fudge-making can as easily produce a potful of frustration as a batch of pure delight.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
"I want a recipe for a cookie made with a cake mix, something quick and tasty for lunch boxes and snacks," wrote Mrs. H. Hefner of Baltimore.Responses poured in, and tester Laura Reiley chose the Duncan Hines peanut butter cookies sent in by Shelley Silver of Baltimore.Josephine C. Elsen of Wheaton, Ill., requested a recipe for Genessee chocolate -- "a rich fudge that has some molasses in it." The chosen response came from Gail Jones of Bend, Ore., who found the recipe "in the 'American Heritage Cookbook.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | December 25, 2008
Sweet expectations are mixing with a bitter reality for longtime fans of Rheb's Candy in Lexington Market: After 70 years, the family-owned sweet shop is shutting down its stall Saturday. "They're closing? Why? I'm shocked, I'm shocked," said a frowning Barbara Dean as she prepared to spend $85 on butter creams, almond paste and boxes of dark chocolate as Christmas gifts. "I'm sad," she said. "It's just a tradition to come to Lexington Market. It's the end of an era." Rheb's President Wynn Harger said he had decided to close the stall and focus on his flagship Wilkens Avenue shop and growing Internet sales primarily because of his company's issues with the management of the market.
TRAVEL
By Rosemary McClure and Rosemary McClure,Los Angeles Times | August 17, 2008
MACKINAC ISLAND, Mich. - Temptation drifts on the wind in this enchanted island in northern Michigan. Seventeen fudge shops crowd the downtown area, and delectable scents escape every time a door opens. Chocolate, peanut butter, more chocolate. Each store offers free samples. "Try them all," said a tour guide when I visited early in July. "It adds up to about a pound of the best fudge you've ever tasted." I would never do that, I thought to myself when he said it. But I tried one. And then another and another.
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