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By Kathy Lally | January 4, 2004
Campaigners for human rights in Russia call it "spy mania": In the past eight years, perhaps a dozen people, including environmentalists, scientists and journalists, have been charged with spying. The arrests began in 1996, when Alexander Nikitin, a retired Russian navy captain, was charged with espionage and treason for helping to write a report for Bellona, a Norwegian environmental organization. Nikitin, who had served with Russia's northern fleet, helped document the danger of deteriorating nuclear reactors on Russian submarines.
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NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Sebastian Rotella and Kim Murphy and Sebastian Rotella,Los Angeles Times | February 11, 2007
LONDON -- Yuri Felshtinsky well remembers when he spent the better part of five hours pleading for the life of his friend, Alexander Litvinenko. It was May 22, 2000. Litvinenko, a colonel in the Russian Federal Security Service, or FSB, had just spent four months in prison, having gone public with allegations that senior secret police officers were involved in murder and kidnap operations for financial gain. Now he was free, but for how long? Felshtinsky called up Litvinenko's old boss, Maj. Gen. Yevgeny Khokholkov, and agreed to meet him for dinner at a small restaurant near Moscow's old Ukraina Hotel.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 1, 2001
MOSCOW - John Edward Tobin, the 24-year-old Fulbright scholar arrested in Voronezh on drug charges and then declared by the Russian security service to be an American spy-in-training, was probably a marked man soon after he set foot in Russia. Tobin is a military intelligence specialist in the U.S. Army Reserves, and though the army says he was studying in Russia as a private citizen, the Federal Security Service, known as the FSB, would not have seen him that way. "It's evident that Tobin was constantly watched by the secret service," says Konstantin Preobrazhensky, a retired lieutenant colonel in the FSB's predecessor, the KGB. "All his friends and acquaintances there would have been agents.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | January 4, 2004
Campaigners for human rights in Russia call it "spy mania": In the past eight years, perhaps a dozen people, including environmentalists, scientists and journalists, have been charged with spying. The arrests began in 1996, when Alexander Nikitin, a retired Russian navy captain, was charged with espionage and treason for helping to write a report for Bellona, a Norwegian environmental organization. Nikitin, who had served with Russia's northern fleet, helped document the danger of deteriorating nuclear reactors on Russian submarines.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 2002
MOSCOW - Russia's intelligence agency said yesterday that it had broken a U.S. spy ring that was trying to steal Russian defense secrets, including information about the country's military ties with former Soviet republics. The allegation adds to a list of ruffled relations between the two countries weeks before President Bush is scheduled to arrive in Russia for his first visit. President Vladimir V. Putin's decision to support the American-led war against terror had strengthened U.S.-Russia ties, but disagreements over nuclear disarmament and trade are expected to top the agenda at next month's summit.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1992
A number of the thrifts that had low ratings in the third quarter of 1991, according to IDC Financial Publishing Inc., have made changes since the data in the chart were collected.* Citizens Savings FSB. This thrift reported a profit of $1.5 million for the fourth quarter of last year, in contrast to a loss of $978,000 for the prior quarter.In the first quarter of this year, the Silver Spring-based institution earned $377,000, compared with $27,000 a year earlier. Citizens also said it signed a plan with federal regulators in December that outlined how it intends to meet all capital requirements by the end of this year.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 2000
MOSCOW - Nearly 33,000 feet in the air, the terrified passengers of the hijacked Russian jet little knew that the real threat to their lives wouldn't come from the unbalanced hijacker in the cockpit. Instead, in the middle of their Saturday night ordeal, it suddenly came from rival groups of Russian security officers who suspected each other aiding the hijacker. While the lone hijacker, Akhmed Amirkhanov, threatened the pilots in the cockpit, two officers from the FSB, the main successor agency to the KGB, pulled out their guns to subdue some suspicious-looking characters in the cabin.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 18, 1998
MOSCOW -- The founder of the Soviet secret police was called "the man with the crystal soul," because of his purity in the wielding of terror against the enemies of bolshevism.Today, in post-Soviet Russia, the agency that grew out of Felix E. Dzerzhinsky's leather-jacketed Cheka is less pure in its ideology but it hasn't lost the terror part -- except that now, according to a group of maverick officers, what's being offered is terror for hire.A trail of extortion, kidnappings and murder, all in the pursuit of criminal gain, leads directly to the inner offices of the Lubyanka, headquarters of Russia's fearsome security police, said Lt. Col. Alexander Litvinenko and four of his associates at a news conference yesterday.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 21, 2000
MOSCOW -- In the old Soviet days, the secret police had all the time and money they needed to read mail, tap telephones and keep track of typewriters and their owners. The Internet, bearing its huge flow of information, caught them at a moment of weakness, when government budgets were turning into a trickle too small to support expensive new eavesdropping technology. Resourceful as ever, the successors to the old KGB rose to the challenge. They decided that Internet users themselves should pay for the cost of being bugged.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 23, 2001
MOSCOW - Russian President Vladimir V. Putin put his domestic security agency, known as the FSB, in charge of the stagnant war effort in Chechnya yesterday, telling the army it was time for most of its troops to pack up and start heading home. Putin portrayed the change in command as a logical development, with the emphasis in the rebel republic shifting to special operations and fighting crime. But the Kremlin has made no secret of its dissatisfaction with a military effort that has bogged down, 16 months after the fighting began, into a murky, cynical, but still deadly struggle.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 2002
MOSCOW - Russia's intelligence agency said yesterday that it had broken a U.S. spy ring that was trying to steal Russian defense secrets, including information about the country's military ties with former Soviet republics. The allegation adds to a list of ruffled relations between the two countries weeks before President Bush is scheduled to arrive in Russia for his first visit. President Vladimir V. Putin's decision to support the American-led war against terror had strengthened U.S.-Russia ties, but disagreements over nuclear disarmament and trade are expected to top the agenda at next month's summit.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 1, 2001
MOSCOW - John Edward Tobin, the 24-year-old Fulbright scholar arrested in Voronezh on drug charges and then declared by the Russian security service to be an American spy-in-training, was probably a marked man soon after he set foot in Russia. Tobin is a military intelligence specialist in the U.S. Army Reserves, and though the army says he was studying in Russia as a private citizen, the Federal Security Service, known as the FSB, would not have seen him that way. "It's evident that Tobin was constantly watched by the secret service," says Konstantin Preobrazhensky, a retired lieutenant colonel in the FSB's predecessor, the KGB. "All his friends and acquaintances there would have been agents.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 23, 2001
MOSCOW - Russian President Vladimir V. Putin put his domestic security agency, known as the FSB, in charge of the stagnant war effort in Chechnya yesterday, telling the army it was time for most of its troops to pack up and start heading home. Putin portrayed the change in command as a logical development, with the emphasis in the rebel republic shifting to special operations and fighting crime. But the Kremlin has made no secret of its dissatisfaction with a military effort that has bogged down, 16 months after the fighting began, into a murky, cynical, but still deadly struggle.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 7, 2000
MOSCOW - A Moscow judge found Edmond Pope guilty of espionage yesterday and sentenced the retired U.S. naval intelligence officer to 20 years in prison - the first such action against an American in four decades. Pope was accused of trying to obtain plans for a high-speed torpedo and was convicted even though the primary witness against him recanted on the stand. His trial, which was held behind closed doors and saw nearly every defense motion denied, became a milestone on the road of deteriorating relations between the United States and Russia.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 15, 2000
MOSCOW - Nearly 33,000 feet in the air, the terrified passengers of the hijacked Russian jet little knew that the real threat to their lives wouldn't come from the unbalanced hijacker in the cockpit. Instead, in the middle of their Saturday night ordeal, it suddenly came from rival groups of Russian security officers who suspected each other aiding the hijacker. While the lone hijacker, Akhmed Amirkhanov, threatened the pilots in the cockpit, two officers from the FSB, the main successor agency to the KGB, pulled out their guns to subdue some suspicious-looking characters in the cabin.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 12, 2000
MOSCOW - For the activists who try to keep an eye on the Russian security services, the espionage trial here of an ailing retired U.S. Navy intelligence officer confirms their worst suspicions about the methods and intentions of the former KGB. Edmond Pope - the first American on trial for spying here in 40 years - was arrested April 3 by the Federal Security Service, a successor to the KGB. The FSB charged him with trying to buy secret blueprints for...
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 12, 2000
MOSCOW - For the activists who try to keep an eye on the Russian security services, the espionage trial here of an ailing retired U.S. Navy intelligence officer confirms their worst suspicions about the methods and intentions of the former KGB. Edmond Pope - the first American on trial for spying here in 40 years - was arrested April 3 by the Federal Security Service, a successor to the KGB. The FSB charged him with trying to buy secret blueprints for...
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 12, 2000
MOSCOW - Armed government agents in black ski masks yesterday raided the headquarters of the only major Russian newspaper and broadcast company that has been consistently critical of the Kremlin. The event managed to be both stark and murky at the same time. Law enforcement agencies gave conflicting accounts as to what was going on and why. The media company said the raid was pure politics and an attempt by the new government of President Vladimir V. Putin to shut down an independent voice.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 12, 2000
MOSCOW - Armed government agents in black ski masks yesterday raided the headquarters of the only major Russian newspaper and broadcast company that has been consistently critical of the Kremlin. The event managed to be both stark and murky at the same time. Law enforcement agencies gave conflicting accounts as to what was going on and why. The media company said the raid was pure politics and an attempt by the new government of President Vladimir V. Putin to shut down an independent voice.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 21, 2000
MOSCOW -- In the old Soviet days, the secret police had all the time and money they needed to read mail, tap telephones and keep track of typewriters and their owners. The Internet, bearing its huge flow of information, caught them at a moment of weakness, when government budgets were turning into a trickle too small to support expensive new eavesdropping technology. Resourceful as ever, the successors to the old KGB rose to the challenge. They decided that Internet users themselves should pay for the cost of being bugged.
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