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Liz F. Kay | October 4, 2011
It's one thing to go foraging. It's yet another to know where to look! With the help of neighborhoodfruit.com , you can locate both fruit trees on public land, such as in parks, as well as trees on private property where the owners have offered the fruit to those willing to pick it. On the flip side, if you know of a publicly accessible tree, or have a fruit-bearing tree on your property that you can't or don't want to pick, this might...
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
As Nathan Reid wandered around his Canton neighborhood, he saw threats everywhere. Empty tree wells, weedy window boxes and flowers that bloomed and died before the end of summer - unkind conditions for the fuzzy, buzzing set. "I want homeowners to become more conscientious gardeners," he told a room full of his neighbors Sunday afternoon. "Honeybees depend on it. " The honeybee enthusiast - or honeybee steward, as he prefers to be called - gathered about 30 people in the basement of a church to emphasize the need to save the insects, which not only produce honey, but also pollinate plants and help in the growing of close to a third of the world's crops.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Our cherry tree was oozing sap all over and had dark dead patches on the trunk and branches. The tree service said it had a fungal root rot and we had to cut it down. Can we plant another fruit tree or a vegetable garden when that fungus is in the soil? Will it sicken us? Your tree's disease symptoms match leucostoma canker, also known as cytospora, which is not a soil fungus and doesn't affect humans. Replant with confidence. In the future, take precautions to prevent a stone fruit (cherry, peach, apricot)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
The long, cold winter was good to farmers and gardeners as frigid temperatures and blankets of snow helped kill pests and moisten soil. So when spring arrived, early bloomers surged to life. Then came plunging temperatures, frost and even snow Tuesday and Wednesday nights. The winter already almost certainly means Marylanders will have to wait a few weeks longer than normal for a peach cake or strawberry shortcake topped with local produce. Now farmers are nervously waiting to learn whether two late-season frosts could damage or kill significant portions of blooming plum and peach trees, which are flowering now and particularly vulnerable to cold.
NEWS
By Marty Ross and By Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | October 3, 2004
There's nothing quite like taking a bite out of a crisp, juicy apple, especially when it comes from right outside your own door. Even if you have only a tiny city garden, you probably have enough room to grow your own fruit. Harvesting fruit in your own back yard is very satisfying, and it's not difficult, the experts say. It's important to choose the right size tree for your garden, and to select varieties that are appropriate for your climate, but if you make good choices early on, fruit trees are quite a thrill to grow.
FEATURES
By Baltimore Sun reporter | November 19, 2009
Question: These end-of- season plant sales look great, but I'm worried about timing. How late can I plant? Question: As long as the ground isn't frozen, you can put in containerized or ball-and-burlapped plants. Fruit trees would be an exception.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2010
Question: A peach tree is coming up in our compost pile. Can we make apple and cherry trees this way, too? We want to start an orchard. Answer: Some gardeners have luck growing a good peach tree from a peach pit. But in general, Johnny Appleseed notwithstanding, starting fruit trees from seed presents a big problem — you usually end up with an inferior plant after waiting years for it to bear fruit. Fruit trees started from seed are not clones of the "mother tree."
FEATURES
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
A new nonprofit organization aims to turn the fruits of its labors into fresh food for the hungry. The Baltimore Orchard Project will glean gather otherwise unwanted fruit from trees on public and private land and donate the harvest to food banks, congregations and soup kitchens, says founder and director Nina Beth Cardin, a rabbi and community activist. The group's founding team has 25 members from such agencies as the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future, Tree Baltimore and Baltimore Green Space.
FEATURES
January 26, 1997
I got lazy last fall and failed to fertilize my lawn, which is mostly tall fescue. If the temperature gets up into the 40s or 50s, would it be OK to fertilize this winter?It's never a good idea to fertilize turf during the winter. Runoff of fertilizer salts into waterways is more likely when the ground is frozen or covered with snow. And the roots of grass plants cannot take up and use the fertilizer nutrients at this time. If you've been fertilizing your lawn each year, you can wait until next fall to fertilize.
NEWS
October 29, 2000
Don't expect fruit without full sun Q. My aunt and I planted a couple of semi-dwarf apple trees in the backyard five years ago, and they still have not bloomed or made fruit. We fertilize them twice a year when we do the lawn. They are growing in a shady spot but get the morning sun. Any hope for an apple pie next year? A. Probably not. There are several reasons why no fruit has been produced. Most importantly, fruit trees must be grown in full sunlight. It is unlikely that your tree will ever produce more than a few small apples.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
I'm feeling a little guilty about starting a compost pile for my kitchen scraps. Don't landfills need organic "trash" sources to counterbalance the inorganic trash? Compost guilt-free. Organic matter in landfills decomposes in an anaerobic (oxygen-poor) situation, which causes it to release methane — a greenhouse gas. Your own compost pile will not. It will enrich your soil and plants and feed a natural web of life without any of the cost — monetary and environmental — of buying a manufactured soil amendment.
EXPLORE
May 22, 2012
I have lived in Rodgers Forge for 45 years, and I have some concerns about the wish of Larry Fogelson, head of the community tree committee, to plant many more trees ("Tree committee gets growing in Rodgers Forge," April 26). When the Forge houses on the hill were first constructed in the early 1950s, many of the trees planted by Keelty were silver maples. These maple trees grow quickly. At maturity, they often take down power, phone and cable lines, their roots seek out and invade homeowners' sewer lines and cause uneven pavements - which are a hazard - and they also lead to gutters that need to be cleaned of pods and leaves.
FEATURES
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
A new nonprofit organization aims to turn the fruits of its labors into fresh food for the hungry. The Baltimore Orchard Project will glean gather otherwise unwanted fruit from trees on public and private land and donate the harvest to food banks, congregations and soup kitchens, says founder and director Nina Beth Cardin, a rabbi and community activist. The group's founding team has 25 members from such agencies as the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future, Tree Baltimore and Baltimore Green Space.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for sunny skies and a high temperature near 61 degrees. It is expected to be clear tonight, with a low temperature around 37 degrees. FROM THE WEEKEND... City election change moves forward in House : A measure to move Baltimore's election to the presidential cycle was among scores of bills that cleared the House of Delegates during a rare Saturday session, setting the stage for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the current City Council to be in office for an additional year.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
Just as they do every April, the fruit orchards at Larriland Farm have donned their spring finery. The plum trees at the pick-your-own place in western Howard County sport brilliant white blossoms, while the peach trees are decked out in bright pink. Thing is, it's still March. Spring came early to Maryland, thanks to a run of unusually warm weather that awakened flowers, trees, birds and bees weeks ahead of schedule across much of the eastern United States. Larriland's fruit trees are flowering about a month earlier than usual, according to Lynn Moore, president of the family-run fruit and produce farm in Woodbine.
NEWS
By Nina Beth Cardin | March 13, 2012
Someone, years ago, planted an oak tree on a narrow, forlorn divider toward the edge of a barren parking lot by a large building near my home. Largely ignored, this lone tree staunchly persevered and sank its roots deep into its diminutive field. It was noticeable, not because of the tree itself, which was just a modest, slight thing, but because of its acorns. They were everywhere - a bumper crop heaped upon the ground, where one had to tread carefully to keep one's feet firmly planted.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | September 1, 2007
A gang of caterpillars is taking out the leaves on one branch of my oak tree. It's too late for gypsy moths, and there's no tent or web, so what are they? Orangestriped oakworms are extremely gregarious. These caterpillars of a native moth start out as pale-yellow larvae and eventually become black and yellow-orange striped. They have two short black spines, like antennae, behind their heads. Typically, they feed on one branch at a time and don't do enough damage to merit chemical control.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to The Sun | April 14, 2007
When do I prune and spray peach trees? We're reluctant to use sprays but want to salvage some peaches this year. Peach trees are not pruned when dormant like other fruit trees. Prune between bud-opening and full bloom. They fruit mainly on two-year-old wood, so remove old, unproductive branches. Prune to open the tree canopy center. This reduces disease and increases sunlight, which is necessary for good fruit. Brown rot fungus is ubiquitous on Maryland peaches. To prevent its fuzzy decay, spray a labeled fungicide when 10 percent of blooms open, when 90 percent of blooms open, 10 days later, and at 14-day intervals all summer until two weeks before harvest when fruit changes color but is still too firm to eat. You may be able to get away with only the most critical sprays -- the first two and the last.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
Our cherry tree was oozing sap all over and had dark dead patches on the trunk and branches. The tree service said it had a fungal root rot and we had to cut it down. Can we plant another fruit tree or a vegetable garden when that fungus is in the soil? Will it sicken us? Your tree's disease symptoms match leucostoma canker, also known as cytospora, which is not a soil fungus and doesn't affect humans. Replant with confidence. In the future, take precautions to prevent a stone fruit (cherry, peach, apricot)
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | October 4, 2011
It's one thing to go foraging. It's yet another to know where to look! With the help of neighborhoodfruit.com , you can locate both fruit trees on public land, such as in parks, as well as trees on private property where the owners have offered the fruit to those willing to pick it. On the flip side, if you know of a publicly accessible tree, or have a fruit-bearing tree on your property that you can't or don't want to pick, this might...
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